Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Increased Risk of Additional Lymphoma Types in those with Untreated Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/866/1/Increased-Risk-of-Additional-Lymphoma-Types-in-those-with-Untreated-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 01/20/2005
 
Gut 2005;54:54-59. Celiac.com 01/20/2005 - A link between untreated celiac disease and a rare e

Gut 2005;54:54-59.

Celiac.com 01/20/2005 - A link between untreated celiac disease and a rare enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETTL) has been well established by several studies. According to Dr. Karin Ekstrom Smedby of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and colleagues, there is also an increase in the prevalence of other types of lymphomas in those with celiac disease, such as B cell and non-intestinal lymphomas. In their study the researchers reviewed and reclassified 56 cases of malignant lymphomas that occurred in 11,650 hospitalized celiac disease patients in Sweden. The observed numbers of lymphoma subtypes were compared with those expected in the Swedish population. The researchers discovered that a majority of the lymphomas were not intestinal T-cell lymphomas, but were B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In addition, 44% of the patients with B cell NHL had a history of other autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. As expected, the relative risks for T-cell NHL and primary gastrointestinal lymphomas were markedly increased. According to the researchers: "Most lymphomas complicating coeliac disease are indeed related to the disease and are not of the ETTL-type. There was a remarkable aggregation of autoimmune/inflammatory disorders, female sex, coeliac disease, and B cell lymphoma."