Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Collagenous Sprue - Second Edition of Textbook of Gastroenterology, J.B. Lippincott Company, Philadelphia 1995
http://www.celiac.com/articles/88/1/Collagenous-Sprue---Second-Edition-of-Textbook-of-Gastroenterology-JB-Lippincott-Company-Philadelphia-1995/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 07/26/1996
 
Celiac that do not remain on a gluten-free diet can develop Refractory Sprue. Refractory Spr

Celiac that do not remain on a gluten-free diet can develop Refractory Sprue. Refractory Sprue and Collagenous Sprue patients who initially respond to a gluten-free diet many subsequently relapse despite maintaining their diet. Such patients are then refractory to further dietary therapy. In contrast, others are refractory to dietary therapy from its inception and, assuming they are truly on a gluten-free diet, may not have celiac disease; these patients are said to have unclassified Sprue. Some refractory patients with celiac disease, typical or atypical, respond to treatment with corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive drugs. In others, there is no response and malabsorption may be progressive. Collagenous Sprue is characterized by the development of a thick band of collagen-like material directly under the intestinal epithelial cells and has been regarded by some as a separate entity from celiac disease. However, subepithelial collagen deposition has been noted in up to 36% of patients with classic Celiac Disease and in Tropical Sprue. Although individuals with large amounts of subepithelial collagen may be refractory to therapy, the presence of collagen does not , a riori, preclude a successful response to a gluten-free diet. Collagenous colitis accompanying celiac disease also has been observed and would be considered in the diagnosis of diarrhea occurring in celiac disease patients on a gluten-free diet.