Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Celiac Disease Common in Patients with Lactose Intolerance
http://www.celiac.com/articles/891/1/Celiac-Disease-Common-in-Patients-with-Lactose-Intolerance/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 03/30/2005
 
Digestion. 2005 Mar 16;71(2):106-110 Celiac.com 03/30/2005 – According to Italian researcher

Digestion. 2005 Mar 16;71(2):106-110

Celiac.com 03/30/2005 – According to Italian researchers, those with lactose intolerance have a much higher incidence of celiac disease. In an effort to determine how many cases could be caused by undiagnosed celiac disease, the researchers screened 54 lactose intolerant patients (15 males and 39 females - positive H2-lactose breath test and a negative H2-glucose breath test) for celiac disease. All patients were screened using serum IgA antibodies to endomysium, anti-transglutaminase and total IgA, and anyone with positive results for any one of these markers was give an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The researchers found that a full 24% of those with lactose intolerance had biopsy-confirmed celiac disease. These results were compared to a control group of 50 blood donors from the same region, out of which only 2% were positive--but a follow up biopsy eliminated celiac disease.

The researchers conclude that a full 24% of patients with a positive H(2)-lactose breath test have celiac disease which is the likely cause of their lactose intolerance, and that anyone with a positive H(2)-lactose breath test should first be screened for celiac disease before excluding milk from their diets.