Dig Dis Sci. 2005 Apr;50(4):785-90.

Celiac.com 05/09/2005 – To determine the effect a long-term gluten-free diet has on intestinal permeability in those with celiac disease, Canadian researchers divided celiac disease patients into three groups based on the length of time on a gluten-free diet: Group A less than 1 month; Group B, 1 month-1 year; Group C more than 1 year. Groups B and C were tested three times over the course of 12 weeks for lactulose/mannitol intestinal permeability, endomysial antibody, and 3-day food record. These results were compared to that of Group A and control subjects. The researchers found that intestinal permeability was elevated in those newly diagnosed with celiac disease and in those who were on a gluten-free diet for less than one year. They also found that it increased in those on a gluten-free diet for more than one year in those whose diets were contaminated with gluten. The researchers conclude that intestinal permeability normalizes in most people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet, and gluten ingestion as determined by a 3 day food record correlates with intestinal permeability measurements. Further studies need to be done on the role of intestinal permeability testing in the follow-up care of those with celiac disease.

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