Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Intestinal Permeability in Patients with Celiac Disease on a Gluten-free Diet
http://www.celiac.com/articles/906/1/Intestinal-Permeability-in-Patients-with-Celiac-Disease-on-a-Gluten-free-Diet/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 05/9/2005
 
Dig Dis Sci. 2005 Apr;50(4):785-90. Celiac.com 05/09/2005 – To determine the effect a long

Dig Dis Sci. 2005 Apr;50(4):785-90.

Celiac.com 05/09/2005 – To determine the effect a long-term gluten-free diet has on intestinal permeability in those with celiac disease, Canadian researchers divided celiac disease patients into three groups based on the length of time on a gluten-free diet: Group A less than 1 month; Group B, 1 month-1 year; Group C more than 1 year. Groups B and C were tested three times over the course of 12 weeks for lactulose/mannitol intestinal permeability, endomysial antibody, and 3-day food record. These results were compared to that of Group A and control subjects. The researchers found that intestinal permeability was elevated in those newly diagnosed with celiac disease and in those who were on a gluten-free diet for less than one year. They also found that it increased in those on a gluten-free diet for more than one year in those whose diets were contaminated with gluten. The researchers conclude that intestinal permeability normalizes in most people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet, and gluten ingestion as determined by a 3 day food record correlates with intestinal permeability measurements. Further studies need to be done on the role of intestinal permeability testing in the follow-up care of those with celiac disease.