Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Celiac Disease Screening in Risk Groups: A 14 Year Follow-up Study Focusing on Compliance and Quality of Life
http://www.celiac.com/articles/940/1/Celiac-Disease-Screening-in-Risk-Groups-A-14-Year-Follow-up-Study-Focusing-on-Compliance-and-Quality-of-Life/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 09/14/2005
 
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2005;22(4):317-324. Celiac.com 09/14/2005 - In an effort to determine wheth

Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2005;22(4):317-324.

Celiac.com 09/14/2005 - In an effort to determine whether general screening for celiac disease should be conducted in high-risk groups, Finnish researchers conducted a 14 year follow-up study which focused on dietary compliance, quality of life, and bone mineral density in 53 consecutive screen-detected celiac disease patients who were diagnosed and treated around 14 years ago. The researchers assessed dietary compliance via an interview, a 4-day food record, and a blood antibody screening. Quality of life was measured via the Psychological General Well-Being and SF-36 questionnaires, while gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated using the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale, and bone mineral density was measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The researchers compared the results of these evaluations with those of 44 symptom-detected and treated celiac disease patients, 110 non-celiac disease subjects, and the general population.

The researchers found that 96% of screen-detected and 93% of symptom-detected celiac disease patients adhered to a strict or fairly strict gluten-free diet. In the screen-detected group quality of life and gastrointestinal symptoms were similar to that of the symptom-detected patients and non-celiac disease controls, and their bone mineral densities were similar to that of the general population.

The researchers conclude that dietary compliance in long-term screen-detected patients was good, and quality of life and bone mineral densities were comparable to that of the non-celiac disease subjects and the general population. Based on these results active screening for celiac disease in risk groups is beneficial and in no way harmful.