Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
The Role of Zonulin and Intestinal Permeability in Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/959/1/The-Role-of-Zonulin-and-Intestinal-Permeability-in-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 11/8/2005
 
Celiac.com 11/08/2005 - Today a team of scientists at Alba Therapeutics Corporation (Alba) and the

Celiac.com 11/08/2005 - Today a team of scientists at Alba Therapeutics Corporation (Alba) and the University of Maryland School of Medicine reported a direct link between gluten-induced intestinal permeability and zonulin in tissues from patients with celiac disease. The investigators were able to successfully prevent gluten-induced intestinal tissue leak with the administration of the zonulin antagonist FZI/0 (AT-1001). AT-1001 is an orally administered peptide currently under development for the treatment of celiac disease.

Published in the November issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, these results describe the role that leaky gut plays in celiac disease and the role that zonulin plays in establishing the leak. These results are another milestone towards understanding the role of zonulin in celiac disease, says Alessio Fasano, M.D., lead author of the paper, professor of pediatrics, medicine and physiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of its Center for Celiac Research.

These results reinforce our conviction that AT-1001 has great therapeutic potential and we look forward to confirming these observations in celiac patients soon, stated Alba CEO Dr. Blake M. Paterson.

About Zonulin
Zonulin is a signaling protein that transiently and reversibly opens the tight junctions (tj) between the cells of epithelial and endothelial tissues such as the intestinal mucosa, blood brain barrier and pulmonary epithelia. Zonulin appears to be involved in many diseases in which leakage occurs via paracellular transport across epithelial and endothelial tight junctions (tj),
and thus may play an important potential role in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

About Celiac Disease
Celiac disease is a T-cell mediated auto-immune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals and is characterized by small intestinal inflammation, injury and intolerance to gluten. According to the National Institutes of Health, celiac disease affects approximately 3 million Americans, although the diagnosis is rarely made. The only treatment for celiac disease is complete elimination of gluten from the diet, which results in remission for some patients.

About Alba
Alba Therapeutics Corporation is a privately held biopharmaceutical company based in Baltimore, Maryland. Alba is dedicated to commercializing disease-modifying therapeutics and drug delivery adjuvants based on the zonulin pathway. Albas lead molecule, AT-1001, is targeted towards the treatment of celiac disease and other auto-immune illnesses.

Contact: Dr. Blake Paterson
Alba Therapeutics Corporation
(410) 522-8708