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Thank you for the opportunity to blog about celiac! I have been on a stringent diet for intolerance to all grains, milk & dairy, egg whites, yeast, casein, whey, maltodextrin, modified food starch and MSG since 2000. Dealing with the social ramifications of not participating as others do in the "normal" dietary regimens of "normal" America has been a daunting challenge, but one that continues daily to help me learn greater strength, renewed courage, and increased persistence, all traits which transfer to a multitude of other areas in one's life. Even now I experiment daily with how far I can push the "limits" of eating meat and other proteins, since at age 68 I've also developed rheumatoid arthritis and gout, though the asthma I've had since age 8 is pretty well under control, using daily medication and a breathing machine, along with that stringent diet I mentioned earlier on. I hope that this blogging site will provide new and educational connections, and that I will be able to others as well. Being a mother of three grown children and seven grandchildren, and a mother-in-law twice over, I can daily see how the challenges I've faced can be passed on to the next two or three generations. Meanwhile, it's dinner time, so, Bon Appetit!

Free Shipping @ The Gluten-Free MallMany people with celiac disease of gluten sensitivity will be happy to know that The Gluten-Free Mall now offers free non-frozen food shipping within the 48 contiguous states on orders over $75! Hopefully this will make gluten-free food more affordable for those who need it most. Use coupon code "free123" and be sure to read the rules.

CYE: Celiac Youth of Europe is an umbrella organization for all celiac youth groups in Europe and consists currently out of 17 participating countries. They meet once a year and initiate a project to raise awareness about CD or help improve the life of coeliacs. One of these annual projects was the Bulletin Beat the Wheat.

Beat the Wheat: The Bulletin is a tool for informing coeliacs about various topics. A normal bulletin therefore encompasses articles about travelling, recipes, diagnosis stories, portraits of famous persons with CD, medical curiosities etc. By the way, all the work done considering this project is voluntary.  As the Bulletin is constantly developing, they are always looking for participants from all over the world in order to broaden their coverage. So if you would like to submit an article telling readers about life with CD in your region, or you have an interesting story to tell you are more than welcome to do so.

Their site is: http://issuu.com/beatthewheat/docs/btw_bulletin4

King’s Delight, a Gainesville, Ga. establishment, is recalling approximately 1,572 pounds of frozen chicken nuggets labeled as gluten-free because they contain wheat, a known allergen that is not declared on the label, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The product subject to recall include: [Labels]
8-oz. cartons of “APPLEGATE® Naturals Gluten-Free Chicken Nuggets.”

The establishment number “P-2617” can be found printed on the side of each carton. The products were packaged on Sept. 19, 2012. The lot number “210864” and the best before date “08/28/13” are printed on each carton’s side panel. The UPC code “25317-00556” is printed on the back of each carton. The products were distributed to retail stores in Indiana, Maryland, Oregon and Washington. Consumers who purchased these products should return them to the store for a full refund.

The firm notified FSIS of the problem after a consumer familiar with the product noted a color difference. Upon investigation, it was determined that chicken nuggets containing wheat were mislabeled on Sept. 19, 2012. FSIS and the company have received no reports of illness or adverse reactions due to consumption of this product. Anyone concerned about an illness or adverse reaction should contact a physician.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to ensure that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/FSIS_Recalls/
Open_Federal_Cases/index.asp.

Consumers with questions regarding the recall should contact Gerry Clarkson, Applegate Consumer Affairs Specialist, at (800) 587-5858. Media with questions regarding the recall should contact Joe Forsthoffer at (410) 251-0363.

Source:

Thanksgiving Thoughts

As thanksgiving approaches my stress level increases. It is now not only my own diet that I have to worry about but also the diet of my 13 year old daughter. Thanksgiving being such a family oriented and traditional holiday, especially in the realm of food, makes it very difficult to maneuver. Being a guest at my brother's house, I dare not try to break the family tradition of stuffing the bird with my mother's oyster stuffing. It wouldn't be Thanksgiving for everyone else. So as a result I separately make a turkey, cornbread stuffing and a pumpkin pie to take to immerse my daughter and I in the tradition. This year is especially difficult being that I have been invited to the home of a couple of new friends. I do not want to decline, I do not want to cart my own food and I certainly do not want them to adapt their dinner for me. This has been my dilemma many times when I have been invited to eat at someone's home. It is much easier to eat out these days, but eating in even with the best of intentions from your friends, is very difficult. 

You Are Not A Celiac

Celiac disease has a very unique trait that I have come to notice in the years I have been involved with it: people connect to it in a way that people with almost all other diseases do not...

People with celiac disease will often say "I'm a celiac".

...but you do not hear anyone ever say "I'm a cancer" or "I'm a heart disease" or "I'm an MS".

The exceptions seem to be food related: "I'm a celiac" and "I'm a diabetic". Why do we become the disease? Is it because it affects what we are eating every day? Whatever the reason, I don't know that it's healthy.

A huge portion of regaining balance and having a healthy attitude is to heal and see ourselves as healthy again. Perhaps walking around and saying "I am x-disease" whether we're talking celiac or diabetes is not the way to go.

Not being able to eat gluten simply means something from our diet has been removed or replaced. The conversation can end there. I, for one, am going to consciously make the effort to stop saying "I am a celiac" because it doesn't define me. I am me: healthy, happy, and complete. I am not a disease.

Just food for thought and I'm so interested to know how others feel about this...

Rudi's Organic Bakery, Inc. has initiated a voluntary product withdrawal due to the possible presence of metallic foreign objects in select products or product packaging. Products withdrawn from the market include only Rudi's Organic Bakery Multigrain Oat Bread, Rudi's Organic Bakery Colorado Cracked Wheat Bread, and Rudi's Organic Bakery Cinnamon Raisin Bread.

No other Rudi's Organic Bakery or Rudi's Gluten-Free Bakery products are included in this voluntary market withdrawal.

The affected products include the lot codes below. Lot codes are printed on the quick lock closure, which is the plastic piece that seals the bread bag, and the UPC code is listed on the barcode on the bread package.

  • UPC: 0-31493-82888-8 Rudi's Organic Bakery Multigrain Oat Bread (22oz) Lot Code 1-173-R
  • UPC: 0-31493-54373-6 Rudi's Organic Bakery Colorado Cracked Wheat Bread (22oz) Lot Code 2-193-R
  • UPC: 0-31493-92183-1 Rudi's Organic Bakery Cinnamon Raisin Bread (24oz) Lot Code 1-273-R

Consumers with the lot codes and UPC codes listed and/or who have questions, should contact Rudi's Organic via e-mail at info@rudisbakery.com or call 877-293-0876 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. (MST), Monday - Friday.

Source:

In a recent article on the Science 2.0 blog titled “Celiac: The Trendy Disease for Rich White People”, a blogger named Hank Campbell rants and raves about the current gluten-free, or as he sees it, celiac disease fad. He begins, “Are you white and a little resentful that black people get their own cool disease, sickle cell anemia? There is good news for you. Celiac disease is all the latest rage and you can be any color at all and claim it”. He keeps this tone up throughout the entirety of the piece: he is bitter, but it would seem that he is bitter about the general behavior of “liberals”, rather than fad dieters specifically.

While Mr. Campbell is likely just a grumpy old man who we shouldn't pay any heed to, his views seem to echo certain opinions within the celiac disease community. Many celiac sufferers do (often justifiably) feel that the “fad” status of the gluten-free diet has robbed them of their credibility: they feel that even though they HAVE to adhere to a gluten-free diet to stay healthy, they now run the risk of being perceived as fad dieters (by people like Hank Campbell). Hank mentions “real Celiac victims”, but it's almost as if he doesn't believe they exist, because he seems to think that a meaningful number of people are not just adopting the gluten-free diet, but pretending they have celiac disease. The brunt of his critique falls on the 'fad celiac disease sufferer', if such a thing even exists. I am sure he would have you believe is the majority of people on the gluten-free diet right now.

The problem with Mr. Campbell's writing (and really, his opinion) is that he is raging against a stereotype that I am not sure exists. Who is pretending they have celiac disease? He spends a lot of words trying to prop up a straw man, and to what purpose, I'm not really sure (some commentators have posited that he has a political or pro-vaccine agenda). But he is minimizing the fact that celiac disease is a real disease and many people HAVE to abide by a gluten-free diet in order to preserve their health. It is not a “trendy disease for rich white people”. 

The real message we should be taking away from Mr. Campbell is that celiac disease is ultimately a disease, not a club. The gluten-free diet may be experiencing an explosion right now, but when you think about how hard of a diet it is to stick with, the reality is that many of these fad dieters will quickly lose interest and drop it anyway. Ultimately, the “gluten-free fad” is only helping the celiac community, as more people than ever are getting diagnosed. It is hard not to be embittered by people who adopt a gluten-free lifestyle halfheartedly, and only to stroke their own egos, but that will pass, and if it helps more people get diagnosed, that is very positive thing.

Source:

The Gluten Free Fad

I have noticed within the last year or two that the gluten free diet is becoming more and more popular among non-Celiacs. It’s been on the news, celebrities are talking about it, and major restaurant chains are advertising new gluten free options. However, I have really started to doubt the sincerity of some that are embarking on a gluten free diet.  

I am not trying to discourage anyone from trying a gluten free diet. In fact, the more people that go gluten free the easier and cheaper my food options become. However, I have come to the realization that going gluten free has become a fad. A fad like those awesome stripped toe socks I wore in high school with my flip flops and tennis skirt! Gluten free being a fad is not only extremely irritating but can potentially make all the progress we have made in more widely available food options obsolete. Call me paranoid but I have nightmares that the "ease" (I use that term quite loosely) of attaining gluten free foods will cease to exist and we'll be thrust back into a world of eating cardboard and plywood!

As the saying goes "just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean someone isn't out to get you!" There are a number of examples of fad diets and even allergies that have lost their "popularity" and faded from our minds. A few years ago you couldn’t find a peanut on an airplane and the "South Beach Diet" stamp was on foods up and down the grocery aisle. It's just in the last year or so that people have started giving up on their "no high fructose corn syrup" diets. Everything from vegan-ism to the Atkin's diet eventually fades from the mainstream leaving behind the few faithful followers. If gluten free diets are in fact becoming a fad, it will leave patients with Celiac Disease as the final faithful followers. It will be like going back to technology that was popular in the early 90's.

The only idea I have to counteract this potential assault on how "easy" (again, using the term very loosely) my diet has become is to educate as many people as I can about the diet. So much so that I am starting to sound like a broken record standing on a soap box. I think all gluten free dieters, at least the serious ones, need to band together to make sure we aren't taking one step forward before we take three steps back. You can do this by doing things, like calling Lays and informing them that your (or my) favorite barbeque potato chips are now off limits because they changed their recipe to add barley malt, or supporting company's that change a simple ingredient so a product is gluten free, like Chex cereals. We are the consumers and if we raise enough of a commotion companies will listen. After all, they are in the business of making money! Another important step is discussing with stores about stocking more gluten free options. If you're willing to buy it, most places will try to sell it to you.

Going beyond contacting retailers and manufacturers, educating the public who fall for fad diets is also really important. I don't know how many times people have said to me "hey, I was thinking about trying a gluten free diet." I can't help but think that 99% of the time they are not serious, simply jumping on the rice cracker and tapioca starched bandwagon. There appears to be this vast misconception that cutting gluten from your diet it like cutting fat, calories, sugar, high fructose corn syrup, caffeine, fast food, carbohydrates, and dog food. Okay, maybe not so much the dog food! Still, I cannot stress it enough GLUTEN FREE IS NOT A DIET IT'S A LIFESTYLE!!!

Two of my favorite books regarding Celiac and gluten free diets are Living Gluten Free for Dummies by Danna Korn and Wheat Belly by Dr. William Davis. They both address various medical conditions that can, and have been treated by going on a full gluten free diet. Everything from autism, diabetes, heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis. In some cases, patients not only lost tens to hundreds of pounds, but showed an incredible amount of improvement in their overall health by being able to stop taking certain medications. In rare cases, a few people have even been essentially cured of their ailment. The key to the success, as pointed out by both authors, is a complete dedication to going gluten free. That doesn't mean cutting back on how much Wonder Bread and Twinkies you eat, it's a full commitment. All or nothing.

For some reason, that is the key that seems to be missed by most people without a direct medical problem requiring a gluten free diet. They seem to think they can cut out half of the gluten in their diet, or not eat gluten on Thursdays and Sundays between 12:00 am and 3:57 pm. I like to look at it this way: if something is poisoning your body, if it is preventing your body from functioning properly and causing you pain, weight gain, and a host of other problems, then don't you want to give it completely up? You wouldn't realize you're stomach problems and hair loss are from the arsenic in your morning coffee and keep putting it in the coffee. And if something is poisoning your body, how will you truly know without removing it from the diet? Unfortunately, today's medical technology does not allow testing for a gluten sensitivity or intolerance, it is done largely by trial and error. You cannot do trial and error if you don't do a proper trial!

I realize that there is a lot of hesitation in embarking on a gluten free lifestyle. When I began mine, I had little cartoon pizzas and doughnuts circling the top of my head. It's a momentous undertaking and gluten items will pop out at you at every corner disguised as over the counter medications and chicken gravy. But embarking on such a lifestyle cannot only change your life, but prolong it! You can feel better, have more energy and be more active all by cutting out that pesky little protein. If you are faithful and diligent on a gluten free diet and still feel tired, or have high blood sugar, or are struggling with weight loss and you want your fried chicken and artificial bacon bits back I won't stand in your way. But like the cliché says if something is worth doing, it's worth doing right.

Perhaps I shouldn't take the gluten free fad as an insult, but I do. I see it as making a mockery of my lifestyle. I would still encourage anyone who wants to see if it will help them to give it a try. But if you're going to do it, do it right!

Last month, Portland, Oregon mayor Sam Adams declared May 16th to be Portland's “Gluten-Free Beer Day”, falling within what has come to be considered Celiac Awareness Month by many celiac organizations. The declaration seems to be borne of equal parts enthusiasm for Portland brewing culture, and concern for celiac disease awareness. A number of gluten-free brewers attended the official ceremony at Portland City Hall, including Omission Beer, Deschutes Brewery and Harvester Brewing.

Sam Adams (of no relation to Samuel Adam's Beer, ironically) gave a statement that was not unlike a public service announcement. He cited common celiac disease statistics and facts: 1 in 133 Americans have celiac disease, more than 95% of celiacs are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed, gluten-free diet is the only treatment for the disease, etc. He went on to reason that since Portland is home to over 50 craft breweries, many of which already produce gluten-free beer, Portland should have an official day to spread celiac disease awareness among breweries and beer-drinkers.

Source:

In a much-needed move toward reliable labeling of gluten-free products, Frito-Lay has commenced an effort to test, verify, and eventually label its already gluten-free products. As one of the largest food manufacturers in the world, Frito-Lay (and PepsiCo, its parent corporation) is well-positioned to make a significant difference in the lives of Americans with gluten sensitivities (the initiative is exclusive to products in the U.S.).

Photo: CC--janetmckCeliac disease sufferers should be wary of putting too much trust in this labeling effort though. As evidenced by the recent controversy surrounding Domino's “gluten-free” pizza crust, gluten-free is not standardized terminology (though the NASSCD is trying to remedy this) and gluten-free is becoming a popular, i.e. profitable market.

Unlike Domino's offering though, it would seem that Frito-Lay is doing a thorough job of substantiating their gluten-free claim. They are working with the Food Allergy Research and Resource Program to test both ingredients and finished products for the presence of gluten. Any products containing less than 20ppm of gluten off the manufacturing line (in accordance with the FDA's Proposed Rule for Gluten Free Labeling) will soon be labeled as gluten-free.

It still remains to be seen how their labeling scheme will be rolled out, but looking at their website's guide to gluten-free products, they currently separate their products into two varieties of products for gluten-conscious customers. They are describing their verified and tested (less than 20ppm) products as gluten-free, and their untested, 'kind of' gluten-free (potentially manufactured on gluten-contaminated lines) products as “Products Not Containing Gluten Ingredients”. The website makes it pretty clear what the two designations mean if you read the accompanying text, but there is room for concern if they attempt a labeling scheme that obscures the reality of the products. One would hope they will only label the tested and verified products, and leave the untested ones as they are, to be found by gluten-conscious (but not deathly allergic) customers who have done their research.

Frito-Lay seems benevolent enough, with at least some concern and regard for the celiac population, so hopefully the labeling scheme will reflect this. In addition to their labeling effort, they have partnered with the Celiac Disease Foundation and the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness to commence a celiac disease awareness initiative. It will utilize Frito-Lay's partnerships and social media channels to provide educational content in English and Spanish, hopefully reaching the undiagnosed and unaware portion of the estimated 21 million gluten-sensitive Americans.

Source: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/frito-lay-announces-initiative-to-validate-and-label-products-as-gluten-free-2012-05-18

The North American Society for the Study of Celiac Disease (NASSCD) today announced a call for all restaurants and food manufacturers to properly label gluten-free products to avoid confusion that has the potential to threaten the health of people with celiac disease. (View the statement NASSCD also issued this week at http://www.nasscd.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/NASSCD-Statement-on-Dominos-Pizza.pdf .)

The move comes after two restaurant chains, Chuck E. Cheese and Domino's Pizza, last week separately announced new gluten-free food product offerings that provide significantly different levels of safety for people with celiac disease.

Celiac disease is a genetically inherited autoimmune condition that can damage the small intestine, and can lead -- if untreated -- to further serious complications, including anemia, osteoporosis, infertility and even certain cancers. Celiac disease is triggered by the consumption of gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley.

"We want to eliminate the market confusion that has surfaced recently, provide clarifying facts and information about gluten-free labeling to food manufacturers, and ensure the public's safety," said Stefano Guandalini, M.D., president of the NASSCD, and founder and medical director of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center. "Additionally, there is too much variance from manufacturer to manufacturer."

The announcements of new gluten-free pizza offerings by Chuck E. Cheese and Domino's Pizza are a case in point.

In its May 11, 2012, press release, Chuck E. Cheese described a process intended to protect customers from inadvertent gluten exposure: "To avoid cross contamination or accidental exposure to gluten ingredients in Chuck E. Cheese's kitchens, the personal cheese pizza, manufactured by USDA/FDA-approved, gluten-free facility Conte's Pasta, will arrive to stores in frozen, pre-sealed packaging. The bake-in-bag pizza will remain sealed while cooked and delivered and until opened and served with a personal pizza cutter at families' tables by the adult in charge."

On the other hand, in a May 7, 2012, press release, Domino's Pizza announced a gluten-free pizza crust that it said was "appropriate for those with mild gluten sensitivity" but not for people with celiac disease because "Domino's cannot guarantee that each handcrafted pizza will be completely free from gluten."

"Our position at the NASSCD is that a product is either gluten free or it is not," Guandalini said. "There is no in between. In fact, gluten exposure -- including in minute amounts from cross-contamination -- can be detrimental to people with celiac disease. Repeated exposure can lead to potentially grave medical complications, not to mention a poor quality of life."

According to Guandalini, as little as 10 mg of gluten in a day can reactivate -- in very sensitive patients -- celiac disease.

"We strongly encourage Domino's and other restaurants and food manufacturers to properly label and market gluten-free offerings, as so many responsible companies have done" Guandalini said. "There should be no need for disclaimers. A product is gluten free, or it is not. Marketing a product to be "sort-of" gluten free or "low" gluten is completely useless for those who require the strict diet."

The NASSCD, along with other organizations, has been working with the U.S. Food & Drug Administration to put forth a "gluten-free" standard. That standard would require that, in order to claim a food product as "gluten free," the end product must contain less than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten (equivalent to less than 20 mg in about 2.2 lbs.). Anything short of this standard would be considered false advertising.

The NASSCD was founded last year to advance the fields of celiac disease and gluten-related disorders by fostering research, and by promoting excellence in clinical care, including diagnosis and treatment of patients with these conditions. Approximately 1 percent of the population is estimated to suffer from celiac disease, though the condition often is undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a less well-understood condition with a broad range of symptoms, including fatigue, migraine headaches and digestive disorders, and whose mechanism or cause is not yet identified, and that presently cannot be diagnosed by any medical test. Visit the NASSCD at www.nasscd.org .

Stefano Guandalini, M.D., is president of the NASSCD, and founder and medical director of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center. He is also a professor of pediatrics, and serves as chief of the Section of Gastroenterology at the University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital. Contact Dr. Guandalini at: sguandalini@peds.bsd.uchicago.edu.

SOURCE: The North American Society for the Study of Celiac Disease

Krispak, Inc. of Grand Rapids, MI is voluntarily recalling 16 cases of GFS® Hostess Candy Mix 8-48 oz packages due to a potential mis-pack, resulting in undeclared allergens. A small number of cases of GFS® Hostess Candy Mix were inadvertently put into GFS® Chocolate Sprinkles packages. GFS® Hostess Candy Mix contains wheat and milk and may contain egg, none of which are declared on the GFS® Chocolate Sprinkles package. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to milk, eggs, and wheat run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.

The GFS® Hostess Candy Mix in question was distributed from April 5th – 19th to Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee Gordon Food Service Marketplace Stores.

Product is in a red stand up GFS®, 48 oz pouch that says Chocolate Sprinkles. The code date is embossed on the top of the pouch as 088 12.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

Subsequent investigation indicates the problem was caused by a temporary breakdown in the company's production and packaging processes.

Consumers who have purchased GFS® Hostess Mix by the case, or GFS® Chocolate Sprinkles should investigate their purchase. Consumers whom received mis-packed product are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact Krispak, Inc. at 1-616-554-1377 during the hours of 06:00 – 14:00 ET.

Source:

MEDITERRA S.A. of Chios Greece is recalling PIE WITH CHIOS MASTIHA 80g, HONEY PIE WITH ALMONDS 80g, HALVA PIE WITH CHIOS MASTIHA AND PEANUTS 80g, FIGS STUFFED WITH ALMONDS 360g , GREEK GARLIC SPREAD WITH ALMONDS 180g, HANDMADE TRAHANA PASTA WITH MASTIHA 340g, SMOKED EGGPLANT SPREAD WITH CHIOS MASTIHA 180g, and SPICY GARLIC SPREAD WITH CHIOS MASTIHA 180g, because they may contain undeclared allergens.

Specifically mastiha pie, honey pie and halva pie contain egg albumin, wheat flour and nuts (almonds). The handmade Τraxana contains milk yogurt and wheat gluten. The figs contain nuts (almonds). The Greek garlic spread contains nuts (almonds) and wheat bread. The smoked eggplant contains nuts (pine nuts). The spicy garlic spread with mastiha contains wheat bread. People who have allergies to egg, milk, wheat, and/or nuts run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.

These products have been sold in the United States via internet sales through www.mastihashopny.com  and from one retail store located at 145 Orchard St., New York, New York.

The mastiha pie, halva pie and honey pie are packaged in a plastic bag and wrapped in paper as secondary packaging. Mastiha pie is marked with LOT09120202 and best before end 12/30/2012. Honey pie is marked with LOT27111107 and best before end 06/30/2012. Halva pie is marked with LOT85111104 and best before end 06/25/2012.

The figs with almonds and handmade trahana are packaged in a plastic vacuum bag and a paper box as secondary packaging. Figs are marked with LOT16111115 and best before end 04/30/2012. The handmade trahana pasta is marked with LOT03101125 and best before end 04/30/2012.

The Greek garlic spread, smoked eggplant spread, and spicy garlic spread are packaged in a glass jar with a black lid. Greek garlic spread is marked with LOT03110916 and best before end 09/30/2012. Smoked eggplant is marked with LOT3111020 and best before end 04/30/2013. Spicy garlic spread is marked with LOT01110916 and best before end 09/30/2012.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

The recall was initiated after it was discovered that the allergen-containing products were distributed in packaging that did not reveal the presence of the allergens. Specifically we did not declare that albumin is egg albumin, yogurt is milk yogurt, white bread is wheat bread, as well as almonds and pine nuts are nuts.

MEDITERRA S.A. has printed and sent corrected labels for these products on 04/05/2012 and all products now properly declare all ingredients, including any allergens.

Consumers who have purchased any of these products are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the U.S. retail store at 212-253-0895 between 12:00pm and 7:00pm Eastern Time, Tuesday through Sunday or the manufacturer directly at 0030-22710-51805.

Consumers may visit our website at www.mastihashop.com  for more information about Mediterra S.A.

Source:
Where do you want to eat? This is a very common question that we all are asked everyday but to those of us who suffer from "Celiac" its frustrating and complicated. I always end up having to explain my new life without gluten, and I will admit that it becomes tiresome but its another side effect of the disease. I have done research on where and what I can eat when we go out to dinner with family or friends. A lot of places do offer gluten free menu options, even some fast food chains but from my experience we have to be cautious of cross contamination. Regardless of how many questions I ask about the ingredients, sauces, how it's cooked or what else is cooked on that grill I still seem to get cross contamination a lot. I tend not to eat out or i will eat before I leave the house. So no breakfast on the way to work and no fast food lunches during work for me. I take the time and prepare my meals so I can ensure that all the ingredients are safe, but it's time consuming. My daily diet consists of whole foods, fresh meats and fish. I stay away from frozen foods and vegetables, due to the processing which gluten is often used. I also pay attention to the notes about what else is processed in that plant. "Where do you want to eat Rich?"....At home.
Jelly Belly Candy Co. of Fairfield, CA is recalling Peter Rabbit Deluxe Easter Mix “Gluten Free” candies, because the malted milk balls in the mix contain wheat.
 
The recall only affects 2.7 oz. bags with UPC 071567992794, which have lot codes 111111, 111215, and 120120. They are marked with “best before” dates of January 11, 2013, February 15, 2013, and March 20, 2013 respectively.
 
Gluten is a protein found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye, and triticale. A gluten-free diet is a treatment from celiac disease, a condition in which the digestion of gluten causes damage to the inner surface of the small intestine and an inability to absorb certain nutrients.
 
“Undeclared allergens were the leading cause of FDA food recalls in 2011, but food allergen testing can prevent costly market withdrawals,” states Joy Dell’Aringa, M.S., RM (NRM), CFSP, National Food Microbiology Supervisor at EMSL Analytical, one of the nation’s leading commercial testing laboratories. “EMSL offers extensive food allergen testing, including gluten, total milk, soy, peanut, egg, almond, crustacean, and many others.”

Source:
Han Yang Inc., a Milwaukee, Wisc., establishment, is recalling approximately 25,600 pounds of cooked pork hocks because of misbranding and an undeclared allergen, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The products contain wheat, a known allergen, which is not noted on the label.

The products subject to recall include: [View Label]:
Shrink wrapped packages of various weights of "JANG CHUNG DONG HAN YANG KING JOAK BAL COOKED PORK HOCKS."

The products bear the establishment number "EST. 21880" inside the USDA mark of inspection, and have a four month shelf life. The products subject to recall were produced between Oct. 7, 2011, and Feb. 7, 2012, and were distributed for wholesale and retail use in Los Angeles, Calif. and Chicago, Ill. areas.

The problem was discovered by an FSIS inspector during a label review. The inspector reviewed the ingredient statement of a seasoning component used in the product and the finished product label and discovered that wheat, an allergen, was listed as an ingredient in the component, but not declared on the finished product label. FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall should contact the company's President, Chang Choi, at (414) 389-1099.

My Blessing

I have a new appreciation for the fact that my diet has had to be modified. Without the need to analyze what I am eating, the revelation and reality of what I am eating would not have occurred. I was a person always conscious of healthy eating habits, so I thought. Delving into the world of food has been a very frightening and eye opening experience. Being forced to read labels has taught me to be more cautious and buy from the fresh and organic sections of the market. We are inundated with chemicals, genetically modified products and fillers. The more I learn about those ingredients the more I believe, my dietary limitations are a blessing, not a tragedy.
Price Chopper Supermarkets is issuing a voluntary recall on 'Gourmet Stuffed Clams' from its seafood departments with a scale code of 209181. This product is being recalled due to the fact that it contains milk, wheat and eggs, three known allergens, which are not listed on the store generated ingredient label.

The stuffed clams were sold chain wide in Price Chopper seafood departments between September 30 and December 30. The label was updated on December 30 to correctly reflect all of the ingredients contained in the product.

In addition to alerting the media, Price Chopper has initiated its Smart Reply notification program, which uses purchase data and consumer phone numbers on file in connection with the company's AdvantEdge (loyalty) card to alert those households that may have purchased the product in question.

Customers can return the product to their local Price Chopper for a full refund. For more information, visit the pricechopper.com  website or call Price Chopper at 1-800-666-7667, option 3 between the hours of 8:30am and 7:00pm.
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