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It’s hard to imagine. In six years my celiac daughter, Emma, will go to college — living a gluten free life away from her sheltered little gluten free cocoon we’ve put together for her.  Yes, someday I will need to stop being the go-to gluten-free food encyclopedia and trust that she can keep herself healthy.

Six years may seem like forever away, but before I know it, it will be here.  And what will we have taught her?

Top 10 Tips to Empower a Gluten Free Child

These are in no particular order– some may be big picture, some may be very specific, but I hope by the time “we’re done with her” she’ll be ready to face the world as a strong gluten-free woman.

1. Speak up when something’s not right. This goes for many things in life actually, but when it comes to celiac disease, not speaking up could make you sick.  So far, this has been a challenge, Emma isn’t even correcting her teachers who are mispronouncing her last name (it’s Lezh-AY, not LEG-ger, LEE-ger, or LEDG-er).  But we continue to work on it.

2. Know your ingredients. This goes for gluten free and gluteny ingredients.  She needs to be able to look at a label and based on that, decide of she can have it.  She did this for the first time with a “Fudgesicley” ice cream treat on Tuesday– with success.  She’s 12, so I am happy to see signs of her taking control.

3. Don’t let another adult try and tell you differently. I find even adults my age, younger and older try to explain gluten free to me  and they sell it like they have experience, when in actuality, they only know a small amount or nothing at all. These could be sales people, friends’ parents, or even a restaurant server. Don’t let these people steer you away from what you know.  If in doubt, don’t eat it.

4. Learn how to tactfully turn people down when they offer food. You can go with the truth, “I can’t eat it if it’s not gluten free” (this can be turned into an educational opportunity).  Or perhaps a white lie, “I already ate, thanks for offering”.

5. Learn how to manage that dreaded pizza party. How many times in high school or college did YOU order pizza after a basketball game or on a Friday night with a group of friends?  Exactly. It’s a whole new challenge for gluten-free kids– one we haven’t had to deal with yet.

Sure, Emma’s gone to birthday parties where there is pizza, but when you’re younger, I (still) call the mom, find out what they’re eating, I bring something for Emma that she likes better than pizza and we’re all good.  But when she’s 17 or 21 and everyone’s going out for pizza, she will have to make the decision to speak up (see #1) or just let it go and not eat or even worse, eat the gluteny pizza and get sick?   If she speaks up, what does she say?  “I can’t eat there, let’s go to another place with gluten free pizza”?  Or does she say, “Let’s just go to my house and find something there”?  Since that is one we still have to conquer…feel free to leave comments/tips below with your suggestions on what you or your child has done.

6. Be grateful to people who try to accommodate your gluten-free needs. There are times where people will go out and buy gluten-free food for you or even try making something.  How do you respond?  We’ve been working on this for a few years with Emma.  If you deem it safe, eat it.  I don’t care if it’s something you wouldn’t normally eat– try it and be very verbal in your thank yous.   It takes a lot for people to accommodate gluten-free diets.  If you deem it unsafe, then that’s tricky.  Be grateful that they tried and tell them thank you.  But find a way not to eat it.  If you can explain to the host why you can’t eat it (without insulting them of course), that is the best way to go.

7. Plan and work through a weekend (or weeklong) trip with a friend’s family. Kids get invited to go to cabins, vacation homes, weekend trips with their friend’s families all of the time.  So how will the gluten free child handle organizing it with the friend’s family?  Well that can be tough.  Emma already has some friends whose parents have learned how to feed her.  Some always have certain treats on hand that they know Emma can have.  Which is awesome!  Others may not know much about gluten-free diets, cross contamination and how sick she can get.

I think the best way here (if I or my husband isn’t getting involved), is to talk with your friend about your concerns and then two of you go and talk to the parents together about accommodating the gluten-free diet (see what they’re bringing, volunteer to bring supplements you can eat, find out if there will be any dining out).  If the parents you talk to aren’t getting it….that’s when I would hope the child (in our case, Emma) would choose not to go.

8. Learn how to shop with gluten-free smarts. I am only in the early stages of this Emma.  It is cheaper and healthier to choose fruits, vegetables, and fresh meats at the grocery store..they’re naturally gluten-free!  But what about those breads and fun gluten-free treats like cookies and cake?  Well it’s least expensive to buy the ingredients and make it.  Plus you have control over the ingredients — you can make it healthier and better tasting with some great whole grain gluten free flours that are available.  If that’s not possible, buying several items at one time (ie through Amazon or other online retailers) is a good way to save money  on gluten-free foods.

9. Get COOKING! My daughter doesn’t have an interest here, plus I am a control freak.  So this is a challenge for me.  But she MUST learn how to cook for herself.  Buying those processed foods are so bad for all of us.  This needs to be a priority.

10. Have Fun; Enjoy Being Healthy! We know it is tough managing a diet at the age of 12 or 17 or even 23!  Especially when you see all your friends eating whatever they want.  My suggestions to my daughter would be: always have a stash of your favorite gluten free foods (hers would be popcorn and cereal),  learn ways to make your cooking taste like the best thing ever, and …uh…don’t kiss a boy who just ate gluten… :)   Just had to add that in there…..

Good luck in preparing your celiac child for life.  If you have some real-life examples we can learn from please comment below.

The manufacturer of Publix Caesar Salad Dressing, Ken's Foods, Inc. is recalling a limited number of 16oz Publix Caesar Salad Dressing bottles because it may contain undeclared fish, gluten and soy allergens. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to fish, soy and gluten run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.

The dressing is 16oz. Publix Caesar Salad Dressing with an expiration date of 31MAR12 A. Bottles labeled correctly will have a UPC#4141500730. The product may have the incorrect ingredient statement for “Buttermilk Ranch” dressing. This dressing was distributed to Publix stores in Florida, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama and South Carolina.

The recall was initiated after it was discovered a portion of the run contains an incorrect back panel label. This label does not list the presence of fish, gluten and soy.

As of this date, there have been no adverse reaction complaints reported relating to this recall.

As part of Publix commitment to food safety, they are asking customers to return the product to the place where it was purchased for a full refund or replacement. Consumers with questions may contact Publix at 1-800-242-1227, Monday through Friday 8:00am – 5:00pm EST.

Source:
http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm259674.htm
Kim Son Food Co., an Oakland, Calif., establishment is recalling approximately 84,000 pounds of cooked beef and pork meatball products because of misbranding and an undeclared allergen. The products contain a known allergen, wheat, which is not declared on the label.

The products subject to recall include:
  • 12-oz. and 5-lb packages of “KIM SO’N COOKED BEEF MEAT BALLS WITH CHICKEN & ANCHOVY FLAVORED FISH SAUCE ADDED”
  •  12-oz. and 5-lb packages of “KIM SO’N COOKED PORK MEAT BALLS ANCHOVY FLAVORED FISH SAUCE ADDED”
  • 12-oz. and 5-lb packages of “KIM SO’N COOKED BEEF & TENDON MEAT BALLS WITH CHICKEN & ANCHOVY FLAVORED FISH SAUCE ADDED.”
Each package bears the establishment number “EST. 18862” inside the USDA mark of inspection, and also bears a sticker with the package code 34311-16012.

The products were produced on December 9, 2010 through June 9, 2011, and shipped to retail establishments, including restaurants, in California’s San Francisco Bay as well as Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, and Washington.

The problem was discovered by FSIS inspection personnel during a routine label review and occurred because of a change in ingredients as a result of the establishment changing suppliers. FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks (including at restaurants) to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall should contact Joanna Hua, Kim Son Food Co. Manager, at (510) 535-6888.

Consumers with food safety questions can "Ask Karen," the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day.

Source:
http://origin-www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/Recall_041_2011_Release/index.asp
On May 4th, members of the national celiac and gluten intolerance community met in Washington, D.C., to urge the Food and Drug Administration to finalize gluten-free labeling rules, and to ask Congress to encourage and track FDA's progress. Our national community was remarkably successful in using its grass roots strength to organize together and participate in the democratic process as policy advocates.

The May 4th event was led by a broad-based coalition, including nonprofit organizations, celiac disease centers and gluten-free food manufacturers. Jules Shepard, a gluten-free cookbook author and baker, and John Forberger, a gluten-free athlete and blogger, met through Twitter, came up with the idea for the event and created the website www.1in133.org.

Andrea Levario, Executive Director of the American Celiac Disease Alliance (ACDA), simultaneously crafted a successful political strategy in conjunction with ACDA President Beth Hillson, who is also food editor of Living Without magazine. ACDA has been a key proponent of gluten-free food labeling since 2003. I was the national liaison to the summit for the Celiac Disease Foundation, a founding member of ACDA. Here's part of our group, on the way to one of a dozen Congressional meetings on May 4th. From left:  Susan Walters-Flood (NuWorld Amaranth), Andrea Levario (ACDA), Jeremy Reich, Beth Hillson (ACDA).
Here's part of our group, walking the halls of Congress

Members of Congress were very receptive. Representative Betty McCollum (D-MN) and Representative Nita Lowey (D-NY), are particularly committed to tracking FDA's progress and seeing this through. They both attended the evening reception at the Embassy Suites Washington D.C.

Just a few of the many others present that evening and supporting the event: Dr. Alessio Fasano of the University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research; the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center; King Arthur Flour Company; Nu-World Amaranth; Glutino/Gluten-Free Pantry; Celiac Disease Foundation; Gluten Intolerance Group; National Foundation for Celiac Awareness; Lee Tobin of Whole Foods Gluten-Free Bakehouse; and support groups from around the region.

Something that week also triggered a response by the FDA.  Was it the Washington Post article critical of the FDA's delay, 10,000 letters to the FDA by members of the public, or perhaps the world's tallest gluten-free cake (11 ft. 2 in.!) at the evening reception?  Mike Taylor, the FDA's deputy commissioner for foods, attended the reception and seemed impressed that the coalition is so broad-based and includes prominent members of the gluten-free food industry.

Pictured below at the reception, from the left: FDA Deputy Commissioner Mike Taylor, Living Without magazine editor Alicia Woodward, Representative Betty McCollum (D-MN), American Celiac Disease Alliance executive director Andrea Levario.
Here's a picture from the reception
Deputy Commissioner Taylor told ABC news "I want people to understand that the FDA gets it. We're on this. We'll get this moving," He also spoke before the assembled crowd in the hotel lobby and promised to get the job done. He said the long-awaited safety assessment to determine a safe level for gluten in food would be out within a few weeks, open for a public comment period, and the final rule would follow.

Let's see, that was three weeks ago...FDA, we are watching and waiting.

So who is Monty? The Celiac Disease Foundation support group I lead in Northern California, North Bay Celiacs, had a new mascot for our fundraiser this May during Celiac Disease Awareness Month. He is pictured below with our fundraising director, Molly Dillon. O.K., we must admit that he is not really a gluten-sniffing dog, but he is helping keep an eye on the FDA for us. He supports the FDA's proposed rule of allowing food to be labeled gluten-free if it contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten.
Monty the gluten-sniffing dog

We'll keep everyone posted on developments.

May is recognized as the National Celiac Disease Awareness Month - Horray for May!!   For a disease that affects about 1 in133 Americans that are commonly misdiagnosed, it only makes sense to have national awareness day.  I have been diagnosed for about 10 years now and I have been so thrilled with how much the awareness of celiac disease has grown and how manufacturers, restaurants and schools are becoming aware of the need for a gluten free diet.  I used to dread going out to social events or dining out because I didn't want to appear that I was being disrespectful, high maintenance, but most importantly I didn't want to risk getting sick.  Thankfully, in the past couple of years, I have found a number of gluten free restaurants that make for a quick meal or for a nice date night out.  I am very grateful for everyone who did their part to help raise awareness of this disease as well as the need for a gluten free diet, for whatever the reason.  Let's continue to do our part to make life easier for those in need of a gluten free diet.

Health Coaching

If you have food allergies you probably have been to allergists, general practitioners, gastrointestinal physicians, and the list of traditional doctors can be endless. Well, if you want to go holistic then, the individuals to see are acupuncturists, naturopathic doctors, or even a health coach.

A health coach has studied nutrition, diet, and usually health science. This knowledge can benefit any client who needs assistants with celiac disease, gluten intolerance, one of the top eight food allergens, corn allergy, and candida intolerance.

A health coach can assist you in building your own personal food pyramid. With this type of one on one consultation, trust me you'll benefit.

Some individuals feel completely lost when they are first diagnosed with a food allergen, but there is much more help today then, there was even a decade ago. So look into health coaching, do some of your own research and you'll find that you are on the road to recovery.

We’ve all heard of Oprah’s Big Give show from a few years ago. I am suggesting during this Celiac Disease Awareness Month to do a “Gluten Free Give Back”, as we take time to give back to this disease that has changed our lives so significantly.

During this month I plan to do occasional postings on how we can give back to the gluten free community.  This post is looking at food banks.

We all are likely VERY possessive of our gluten free food– it’s so expensive why would we just GIVE it to someone? I’ll be honest, that is one of my initial reactions, but it turns out in this bad economy there is a need for gluten-free food at your local food bank.

Needing Gluten Free Food at the Food Bank

Last week I set out to learn more about the need in my own community in Minnesota. I talked with Lisa Aune of Second Harvest Heartland and she said,

“We do occasionally receive requests from some of our food shelf partners about the availability of gluten free food for clients of theirs.” Can you imagine being caught in a place where you need to use the food shelf and you can’t even find food options that you can eat?

The gluten-free need has been noticed elsewhere too.  In Massachusetts Pierce’s Pantry is a food shelf specifically for gluten free needs. You can find out how to donate or receive food at this helpful website.

Back in 2009 in Loveland, Colorado, they opened the country’s first gluten free food bank at the House of Neighborly Services. Organizer Dee Valdez of  GlutenFreeDee.com told Tricia Thompson of GlutenFreeDietitian.com what prompted her to take action.

“I remember talking to a mother who had a sick 7 year old who had Celiac Disease. The exasperated mom said she had to choose between feeding her whole family or just feeding her sick daughter the very expensive gluten free food she could find. The distraught mother said, referring to her celiac daughter, “She’s just going to have to live with diarrhea.” — Dee Valdez, Gluten Free Food Bank Organizer and Gluten Free Advocate. Interview on www.glutenfreedietitian.com

That really is a heartbreaking story, but it lead to fabulous work by Valdez.  She also played a role in the new Gluten Free Food Pantry for low-income celiacs in Pittsburgh.  The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness profiled the food bank opening on its website recently.  It just opened this spring.

How Can You Get Active?

So what if there is nothing like any of the aforementioned food banks in your area?  Teri Gruss had some ideas in her about.com article. She recommends talking to your local food shelf and asking them to put a call out for gluten-free donations.  But you could also organize a food drive in your community or with your support group.

Back in Minnesota with my contact at Second Harvest Heartland, she supported the idea of donating gluten-free food,

“…I would suggest that you ask your readers to make those donations to their local food shelf. That way they are keeping the donations in their own community, and I’m sure the food shelves would be thrilled to get it.”  Lisa Aune of Second Harvest Heartland

Nadine Grzeskowiak, RN CEN of GlutenFreeRN.com had a great suggestion, to donate gluten free food to the Stamp Out Hunger food drive that happens on May 14th.  She says, “…put non-perishable GLUTEN FREE food in a bag in your mailbox and your local mail carrier will pick it up and take it to the local food banks.”

I will be donating gluten free food to my area food bank soon and I will let you know how it goes!

Going gluten-free is a hot topic among those embracing a more healthful diet in 2011.  And new research estimates that gluten sensitivity may affect over 40% of the population. 

But for 3 million Americans, going gluten-free should be more than a lifestyle choice. Celiac Disease affects 1 in 133 Americans, yet 95% don't know they have it.

May is National Celiac Disease Awareness Month and the Celiac Disease Foundation is celebrating 21 years of raising awareness.

Monday, May 9th from 11a.m-2p.m join the Celiac Disease Foundation and Pam Mac D's Gluten-Free Market, (3516 W. Magnolia Bl., Burbank) to kick off National Celiac Disease Awareness Month!

Attendees to this FREE event will enjoy yummy, sweet and savory samplings from several Gluten-Free Food vendors, Gluten-Free Grilled Cheese Sandwiches courtesy of Rudi's Gluten-Free Bread, and Gluten-Free Goodie Bags courtesy of PF Changs China Bistro.
Foundation members will be on hand to answer questions and provide informational flyers about Celiac Disease.

Please join us as we raise awareness about Celiac Disease: "The #1 disease you've never heard of"

The Celiac Disease Foundation's Annual Educational Conference and Food Faire will be held on May 14th at the Universal Hilton, Universal City

Registration is available on-line: www.celiac.org. , or by calling (818) 990-2354
Tri City Cheese and Meats, Inc., a Kawkawlin, Mich. establishment, is recalling approximately 87 pounds of Teriyaki Flavor kippered turkey and beef products because they contain wheat and soy, which are not noted on the label. Wheat and soy are both known allergens.

The products subject to recall include: [View Labels]
  • 5-oz. and 1 lb. packages of "Troll Smokehouse, Kippered Turkey, Teriyaki Flavor"
  • 5-oz. and 1 lb. packages of "Troll Smokehouse, Kippered Beef, Teriyaki Flavor"
Individual packages bear "EST. 32015" or "P-32015" inside the USDA mark of inspection. The products were produced between Jan. 1, 2011 and April 26, 2011. The product package code also includes a "sell by date" of May 21, 2011 through Sept. 9, 2011 for the Kippered Turkey, and a "sell by date" of July 9, 2011 through Sept. 2, 2011 for the Kippered Beef. The products were distributed to retail establishments in Michigan.

The problem was discovered by an FSIS inspector during a routine label review at the establishment, and occurred because of a spice ingredient change at the establishment. FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

Source:
Elsie Grace’s Dry Food Company of Frankfort, Kansas is issuing a recall of some dip mix and soup mix products because they may contain undeclared milk, soy, or wheat. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to milk, soy, or wheat run the risk of serious or life threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products. The complete list of these identified products is at the end of this press release.

The recalled Elsie Grace’s products were distributed in KS, NE, MO, NC, OH, IN, AR, KY, PA, OK, IL, SD, IA, WV, MI, to retail gift shops and food retailers.

Elsie Grace’s Dry Food Products are packaged as follows. Dip mixes are packed in clear, safety sealed, rectangular packs with the label stapled to it. They are not marked with any codes, UPC numbers, or dates. The ingredients are listed on the back. Dry soups are sealed in clear safety bags and then placed in a plastic lined craft paper bag. The ingredient labeling is attached to the back of the craft paper bag.

Any retailers still having any unsold products will be supplied with new corrected ingredient labels for all packages. Consumers will be able to return the product to retailers for full refund or package replacement. Replacement labeling will be identified with an asterisk (*) at the end of the ingredients.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

This recall was initiated when it was discovered some of Elsie Grace’s Dry Food Products do not declare ingredients that are allergens. Subsequent investigation indicates the problem occurred in the company’s packaging process. Elsie Grace’s Dry Food Company has changed their labels to ensure customer safety.

Consumers who have purchased Elsie Grace’s Dry Food products are urged to return the product for full refund or replacement. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-785-292-4438 between the hours of 9am to 5pm CST Monday through Friday, or contact us at elsiegraces@yahoo.com.

Affected Products:

Elsie Grace’s Zippy Bacon Dip Mix, net weight .12-oz., and Elsie Grace’s It’s Smokin’ Dip Mix, net weight .08-oz., use imitation bacon bits which contain soy and wheat ingredients. The beef base packets in the dip mixes contain milk and soy ingredients.

Elsie Grace’s Cheesy Onion Dip Mix, net weight .08-oz., contains packets of beef base which contain milk and soy ingredients.

Elsie Grace’s Hearty Potato Soup Mix, net weight 10.6-oz., contains milk, soy, and wheat ingredients.

Elsie Grace’s Spuds and Cheese Soup Mix, net weight 10.6-oz., contains milk and soy ingredients.

Elsie Grace’s Broccoli and Cheese Soup Mix, no net weight on packages, contains milk and soy ingredients.

Elsie Grace’s White Chili Soup Mix, net weight 9.9 oz., contains milk and soy ingredients.

Source:
Our first Easter Sunday without gluten. Not as hard as one would think, but since Kaia is also allergic to dairy, latex, beef, cherries  and soy, a lot of candy is already off limits so I just needed to refine my already dwindling list of safe candies.

Growing up, the Easter Bunny never brought a lot of candy he always seemed to bring the one thing we were “dying” to have, so when it came time for the Easter Bunny to start visiting my little girl, it only seemed right to have a little candy and toys to make up for the lack of candy.  Kaia has been dairy free since she was 6 months old so Easter has always been a little bittersweet for her (me really). I have never found (at least one I can afford) a Kaia friendly chocolate Easter Bunny.

Kaia’s Easter Basket has always consisted of little toys, coloring books,  latex free markers and crayons (Crayola is cross contaminated), socks, bubbles, summer play toys and whatever Kaia just couldn’t live without that year.

Fast forward to Easter 2011. This year I had to read for that one extra ingredient—wheat/gluten. As I started to head to my tried and true candies for her, they were quickly slipping away. Twizzler—the second ingredient is wheat flour!! Argh! Nope that jelly bean has gluten, that one two, oh that chocolate is gluten free, but no it has dairy, this went on and on. The more aggravated I got, it seemed the less candy she could have. It seemed all I could find that was Kaia friendly was dum dum suckers, Double Bubble, and  Swedish Fish and Eggs.  I had my old standby her Enjoy Life Candy bars, but I wanted something special.

The more I got read ingredients the madder I got, then it hit me---Kaia doesn’t miss what she has never had. The worst part of going gluten free was taking pop tarts away and she handled that like a trooper. I was getting upset, not because Kaia wouldn’t have an Easter Basket, I was getting upset because I was again hit in the face that my daughter is different, however she rarely notices she is different.   

A couple minutes of self pity and I moved forward. Kaia had the Easter basket of her dreams with everything she wanted—and in the end I had a huge smile on my face—all because my beautiful little girl was happy--really happy.
I am now collecting information, research, articles, professional papers, and especially, patient stories, for a new project. Many people with food sensitivities and with celiac disease suffer from headaches, or have family members who do. I would love to hear from anyone with an interesting headache "case history" they're be willing to share confidentially, and from any practitioners who have learned something valuable from treating patients for headaches. What do think it's most important for the public to know about prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of headaches? Do you have any books, articles, professional papers, neurology conferences, or research facilities you'd recommend?

Help me spread the word that there is help for chronic headaches.

Please contact me via email: bewell@wellbladder.com or choosehealth@glutenfreechoice.com

Thanks for your help with this exciting new project!
I never considered myself much of a beer drinker until I had to go on a gluten free diet, and it wasn't until that moment then that I realized how many beer choices I once had.  Thankfully, I have found a couple brands of gluten free beer that I enjoy from time to time, but now that summer is quickly approaching, I have been keeping an eye out for a light version of a gluten free beer.  After many trips to my local stores, I just assumed that it wasn't possible to make a low calorie gluten free beer until recently found out about a new gluten free light beer called “Tread Lightly” ale by New Planet.  Each 12oz bottle only counts for 125 calories! Currently, it is only distributed within the state of Colorado but I have high hopes that I will be able to find it locally one day and that other gluten free beer makers will experiment with lower calorie versions of their gluten free beers as well.

Source: http://www.fitsugar.com/New-Planet-Beer-Low-Calorie-Gluten-Free-15528658

I recently saw a post on Facebook in the Celiac Global Guide group about "meat glue."

It told celiacs to beware if you are eating meat because you are most likely, directly digesting transglutaminase (meat glue.) It may be one way that harmful stuff is getting into your system and why you may not be recovering 100% even if you are being careful about gluten. Unfortunelty, the meat industry is protected. They do not need to list this as an ingredient. This enzyme has been approved for use in the United States, Japan and most European countries.

This white powder called "meat glue" makes scraps of beef, lamb, chicken, and fish stick together so closely that it looks like a solid piece of meat.

Everyone believes if you eat gluten free and have fresh meats, fruits, vegetables, and fish you will get healthier. Well, this new secret may be the exact reason why celiacs are not getting better. In fact, this may be a cause for celiacs developing colon cancer and other auto-immune diseases.

Going vegetarian or vegan if possible might be a safer bet if you can. If you continue to eat meat I personally would go organic, antibiotic and hormone free. And maybe even stick to chop meat. There is nothing to glue there to begin with.

Check out this exclusive for yourself here for more detailed information:

Brandy Wendler, wife of JohnRoss Wendler, pilot officer of Elmendorf Air Force Base who is serving in Japan’s relief effort, was crowned Mrs. Alaska United States 2011 in front of a packed auditorium at the Wilda Marston Theatre in Anchorage on Saturday, April 2nd, 2011.  Although the Mrs. Alaska pageant was Mrs. Wendler’s first time competing in a pageant, her passion for speaking about Celiac disease, a disease Mrs. Wendler was diagnosed with 3 years ago, stole the hearts of the judges and the entire audience.

Mrs. Alaska United States is a prestigious and elite title, which requires each contestant to choose a platform to speak on throughout their reign, should they become Mrs. Alaska.  Brandy Wendler chose as her platform: “Against the Grain, Raising Awareness for Celiac Disease” and has already begun making appearances throughout the community to increase awareness and support public health.

Mrs. Alaska, Brandy Wendler, currently lives in Eagle River, and is available for appearances and speaking engagements.

More information, including her public calendar and Mrs. Alaska blog, is
available on www.MrsAlaska.com
Respected Sir/Madam,

Greetings from Celiac Disease Society of India-Maharashtra chapter!

We have recently started Celiac Disease Society of India-Maharashtra chapter in Central India. Prevalance of CELIAC IN Northern India is well know . Unfortunately we have no data from central India. We have started Central India Celiac Disease Registry.

In JULY 2011 we are planning to have CME with  public awareness program for celiac disease.This would be first monothematic CME in CENTRAL India WITH emphasis on celiac disease for genral public as well as pediatricians and clinicians.

We face same  problems as availability of gluten free products, their standards, gluten free medications,  low awareness even among physicians about this condition.

We would like to request you to contribute  academically AND  for management of  this venture. Combined venture of CDSI-Maharashtra chapter &YOUR'S organisation  over a larger scale as International forum would be sincerely appreciated BY ALL and impact value for work in celiac  HERE IN CENTRAL INDIA would move forward in a right direction.

Please do feel free to communicate and suggest regarding any query.

Hoping for long term symbiotic association.

dr.yogesh waikar

MBBS, MD,DNB,MNAMS,PGCC,CC

Fellow in pediatric Gastroenterology & liver transplant

Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

CARE hospital, NAGPUR.MAHARASHTRA, CENTRAL INDIA .

INDIA.

President :

CELIAC DISEASE SOCIETY OF INDIA-MAHARASHTRA chapter.

NATIONAL LIVER FOUNDATION-PEDIATRIC  chapter

CENTRAL INDIA CELIAC DISEASE REGISTRY.

PEDGIHEP-evidence based pediatric gastroenterology group.

www.pedgihep.jigsy.com

The USDA is promting the recall of 131,000 pounds of frozen Pizza Al Pollo Asado pizzas that fail to mention that they contain wheat on their ingredient labels, which is in direct violation of the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004. An official USDA product recall should be issued shortly.

Source:
CBS News
Old World Meats, a Duluth, Minn., establishment is recalling approximately 83 pounds of individually packaged hot and teriyaki-flavored red meat jerky products because they contain soy, wheat and milk that are not noted on the label. Soy, wheat and milk are known allergens.

The products subject to recall include: [View Labels]
  • 1.5-lb. cases of "Old World Meats ORIGINAL FLAVOR BEEF STICKS HOT" with each box containing 24 individual 1 oz. packages.
  • 1.5-lb. cases of "Old World Meats ORIGINAL FLAVOR BEEF STICKS TERIYAKI SNACK STICKS" with each box containing 24 individual 1 oz. packages
Individual packages bear the establishment number "EST. 3448" inside the USDA mark of inspection. The hot-flavored product label would also contain the code number 3022011 printed on the lower portion. The teriyaki-flavored product label would contain one of the following code numbers: 2172011, 3032011 or 3092011 printed on the lower portion. The products were produced on one of the following dates: Feb. 16, March 2, March 3 or March 8, 2011, and shipped to two distributors in the greater Duluth area.

The problem was discovered by an FSIS inspector during a label review at the establishment and may have occurred because of a change in ingredients at the establishment. FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

Source:
Monogram Meat Snacks, LLC, a Chandler, Minn., establishment is recalling approximately 5,125 pounds of Hannah's Honey Cured Turkey Sticks because they contain an undeclared allergen, wheat, which is not declared on the label. Wheat is a known allergen.

The products subject to recall include: [View Label]
  • 100 count cases containing 1-oz. packages of "HANNAH'S HONEY CURED TURKEY STICK." These products have an identifying case code of "706179" and the following package codes (use by/sell by dates): 09/09/11 and 10/01/11.
  • 560 count cases containing 1-oz. packages of "HANNAH'S HONEY CURED TURKEY STICK." These products have an identifying case code of "330074" and the package code (use by/sell by date) of 10/01/11.
Each package bears the establishment number "P-15727" inside the USDA mark of inspection.

The products were packaged on Dec. 13, 2010 through March 4, 2011, and shipped, including via internet sales, to institutions (prisons and one homeless shelter) in Calif., Colo., Ill., Mo., and Ohio.

The problem was discovered by the plant, and occurred because of a change in ingredients at the establishment. FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

Source:

Faribault Foods, Inc. announced today a voluntary recall of Field Day Organic Garbanzo Beans because some cans with this label may contain Minestrone soup. Faribault Foods received two reports that cans of the Organic Garbanzo Beans contain Minestrone soup (a vegetable and pasta soup). No other lot codes of Field Day Organic Garbanzo Beans or Field Day products are affected.

The Minestrone soup contains wheat, milk, soy, and egg allergens.

People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to wheat, milk, soy, or egg allergens run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume the Minestrone soup product.

The products involved were sold in grocery and other retail outlets nationwide.

The following product, with the specific code date listed, is affected by the recall:
  • Field Day Organic Garbanzo Beans    Size: 15 oz    UPC: 42563 60003    Code: 813 C1 014 10
The code is printed on the bottom of the can.

No illnesses have been associated with these products. Retailers are removing the product from the store shelves.

Source:
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