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This just in from Taco Time:

Local Quick Service Restaurant is First to Offer Gluten-Free Menu Items in
the Puget Sound


RENTON, Wash. - (February 7, 2011) Today, Taco Timme Northwest, a
northwest-based family-owned Mexican quick service restaurant featuring
fresh ingredients, launches its new Fit-Hits menu. The new menu provides
customers with low calorie entree options to make great choices for good
health and is the first Puget Sound-area quick service restaurant to
feature gluten-free items on its menu.
Each Fit-Hits menu item is distinguished by simple icons and includes
information about calories, fat and sodium content. The Fit-Hits menu
features eight items with 400 calories or less and four gluten-free items
including white chicken chili, a Baja taco, a Southwest chop salad and a
light chicken taco salad.

"At Taco Time Northwest, we're proud to use the freshest
ingredients in all of our menu items," said Robby Tonnkin, president
of Taco Time Northwest. "By identifying the healthiesest options,
we're giving our customers the tools they need to to make informed
purchases to satisfy their tastes and meet their dietary goals."

To kick-off the Fit-Hits menu, Taco Time Northwest introduces Taco Time
Health Coach Deborah Enos, who specializes in bringing nutrition
information to busy people. A certified nutritionist, accomplished author
and motivational speaker, Enos serves on the board of the American Heart
Association and has been featured in Self Magazine, Better Homes and
Gardens and Good Housekeeping. Enos will be available through the Taco Time
Northwest Facebook and Twitter pages to answer customer questions and
provide nutrition tips that can be easily applied to daily life.
In addition to the Fit-Hits menu, Taco Time Northwest's website
offers a Build A Meal tool that allows customers to view nutrition
information for each item on the Taco Time menu and to calculate the
complete nutritional information for the entire meal.

Fit-Hits menu items range in price from $1.59 to $5.59. For more
information about the Fit-Hits menu, visit www.TacoTimeNW.com or call (425)
226-6656.
American Spoon Foods is voluntarily recalling Apple Chipotle Salsa, Maple BBQ Grilling Sauce, and Pumpkin Chipotle Roasting Sauce. These three products may have various lot codes. The lot codes are the first 4 numbers of the 12 digit code printed directly on the glass on the back of the jar below the “Best Flavor By” date. Affected products have the following codes:

• Apple Chipotle Salsa, 13.5 oz jar, UPC code 019363016047
     • All codes from 9301 – 9363
     • All codes from 0002 – 0365
     • All codes from 1002 – 1034
• Maple BBQ Grilling Sauce, 15 oz jar, UPC Code 019363014371
     • All codes from 9301 – 9363
     • All codes from 0002 – 0365
     • All codes from 1002 – 1034
• Pumpkin Chipotle Roasting Sauce, 14 oz jar, UPC Code 019363014173
     • All codes from 9301 – 9363
     • All codes from 0002 – 0365
     • All codes from 1002 – 1034
• If you have trouble reading the code, err on the side of caution and discard the product.
These products may contain undeclared wheat which may cause reactions in those with wheat or gluten sensitivities.

Source:

Some 492 8-ounce boxes of Ian's Natural Foods wheat free, gluten free mac and no cheese and wheat free, gluten free French bread pizza because they may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Listeria can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. The mac-no-cheese has a use by date of 26 Aug 2011 and UPC 7-49512-43670-8. The pizza has a use-by date of 28Aug2011and UPC 7-49512-91572-2. The company says no other packages are effected.

Source:
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2011/01/24/business/AP-US-Recalls.html?src=busln

This just in from Jennifer Iscol of the North Bay Celiacs:

Hello to all in the national celiac and gluten-free community, I eat gluten-free and I VOTE!

The Food and Drug Administration is over two years late publishing the gluten-free labeling rules mandated by Congress in the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection of 2004 (FALCPA). The rules were due by August 2008. Congress needs to press the FDA to act, and the FDA needs to get the job done.

We are tired of wondering if the food we buy is safe and tired of waiting quietly for the FDA to get around to doing its job. The FDA has had over SIX YEARS to study this issue. Enough!

The American Celiac Disease Alliance is urging everyone to act now. It takes just a couple of minutes to use their website to automatically send emails to the Food and Drug Administration and Health and Human Services (both run by women!), and your Senators and Representative in Congress.

Beth Hillson, President of the American Celiac Disease Alliance, writes, "Let's show our strength by shouting out how important this is to us.  Tell the FDA to finish the GF Labeling regulations. Tell them that people with celiac disease require safe, gluten-free foods.  Tell them to finish the FALCPA Labeling Rules NOW."

Go to http://www.capwiz.com/celiac/home/ to send emails or letters today. You can use their letters or write your own.

Forward and post this link on every celiac and gluten-free blog, list and group. FDA, GET THE JOB DONE!

I would like to thank the American Celiac Disease Alliance (http://americanceliac.org/) for organizing this effort and providing this service for free, and encourage everyone to support ACDA with a donation.
The Gluten Free Certification Organization is Proud to Announce the Certification of the Raymond-Hadley Corporation, a Large-scale, Niche Producer.

Raymond-Hadley Corporation is now certified to provide gluten free ingredients and production and packaging services for clients requiring gluten free products.

Food companies and food production plants face a multitude of challenges in not only acquiring gluten-free ingredients but in the process of gluten-free food production itself, which is why the recent certification of the Raymond-Hadley Corporation is exciting and welcome news for the industry.

The services Raymond-Hadley has to offer the gluten-free food producer are many. Their gluten free ingredient stock is extensive and includes both commodity, such as beans and flours, and more unusual ingredients, such as ethnic spices. The company also provides gluten free certified production services including formulation and blending of dry mixes and packaging procedures.

Currently the Raymond-Hadley customer client base includes United States and Central and South American companies. Certification by the Gluten Intolerance Group®, the reigning force behind the national standard for safe gluten levels in food products, has provided the company a valuable niche in the food manufacturing industry.

To learn more about the Raymond-Hadley Corporation
Website: http://www.raymondhadley.com
GenCare, a retirement living community, has expanded upon their award winning Whole Life Living Culinary Program by becoming gluten free food service accredited. In an effort to support their vision of pairing health and wellness promotion with illness management, the facility now can offer gluten-free options to community members.

GenCare Lifestyle is on a mission: to inspire senior residents to make healthier choices so they can simply enjoy living. Expanding upon its award winning Whole Life Living Culinary Program GenCare recognized that nearly 25 million people follow a gluten-free diet and over 60% of persons with celiac disease fear dining out. The Whole Food, Whole Life initiative is one element of the Seattle-based organization's Whole Life Living wellness program. The program promotes health and wellness by providing healthy lifestyle choices rather than solely managing illness. Leon Grundstein, founder and CEO, shares that you can't live forever but you can live well, by making simple changes in your lifestyle.

It is a "staggering" challenge for retirement and assisted-living communities to feed large numbers of residents something delicious every day and keep them both healthy and satisfied, Grundstein observes. Yet "food is the foundation," he says. "It fuels the engines of your heart and mind." GenCare's professionally trained chefs prepare "tasty, nourishing meals for residents made from fresh, whole and organic natural foods," according to Grundstein. With this focus on whole life dining, the culinary initiative "supports older adults who want to be well and eat well," he explains.

Until now, mature adults living gluten-free had no options for retirement facilities where they felt the facility could provide safe meals. Many times mature adults have been turned away because retirement communities didn't know how to meet their nutritional needs. GenCare's devotion to providing gluten-free as part of the Whole Life initiative is wonderful news to those wishing to live healthy with age, according to Cynthia Kupper, RD; Executive Director Gluten Intolerance Group of North America (GIG).
Subway Restaurants is testing a gluten-free roll and gluten-free brownie in the Dallas-Fort Worth and Tyler/Longview, TX markets starting the week of January 10th. The gluten-free roll and brownie will give Americans with gluten sensitivities, gluten intolerances, and Celiac Disease another alternative to their diet.

All Subway gluten-free rolls and brownies being used during the test come prepackaged and individually wrapped. Sandwich Artists are instructed through a tutorial video to cut the roll with a pre-wrapped knife and only use once. The same sandwich artist will prepare the order from beginning to end, so only one set of hands will touch the sandwich, eliminating cross contamination. The process is very thorough to ensure a 100% gluten-free product. Extra measures are taken to ensure gluten does not contaminate other foodstuff such as meat, cheese, and vegetables.

We look forward to seeing Dallas-Fort Worth and East Texas residents take advantage of this new menu item during this testing period. Our hope is to offer gluten-free products nationwide.

For more information about the Subway chain, visit www.subway.com.
Post Foods, LLC, the makers of Fruity and Cocoa Pebbles, announced plans to improve its most popular kids’ cereals in its ongoing effort to address the rise in nutritional concerns among American consumers.

Beginning in January, Post Fruity and Cocoa Pebbles cereals will have a lower sugar content of 9 grams per serving. In addition to lowered sugar levels, all Pebbles varieties are also Cholesterol Free, an Excellent Source of Vitamin D, Low Fat and provide 10 Essential Vitamins and Minerals.

Fruity and Cocoa Pebbles, rice-based cereals, will also be certified as Gluten Free, a relatively unique distinction in the cereal category. In response to increased concerns over celiac disease and products containing wheat gluten, the brand went through a rigorous process to achieve Gluten Free status on both Fruity and Cocoa Pebbles products.

“Post Foods is dedicated to providing both nutritious and delicious cereals for people of all ages, and we’re pleased to announce improvements to the Pebbles brand that will assist in our ongoing efforts to improve kids’ nutrition,” said Bart Adlam, President of Post Foods. “By lowering our sugar content and providing Gluten Free certification, we hope moms feel confident serving a cereal that combines the fun and heritage of Bedrock with great taste that kids love. “

Additionally, Post Foods is working as part of the Children’s Food & Beverage Advertising Initiative (CFBAI), a program launched by the Council of Better Business Bureaus to help tackle the issue of childhood obesity by changing the mix of advertising messages directed to children under 12 to include healthier choices. A report released Dec. 15th by the CFBAI shows Post Foods is demonstrating compliance with our pledge to advertise healthier foods to kids under 12.

“This is a wonderful holiday present for consumers - iconic cereals with the same great taste but lower sugar content,” said Elaine Kolish, Vice President and Director of the CFBAI. “We commend Post Foods for its commitment to making and advertising healthier choices for kids. This is one more great example of how the commitment to self regulation and responding to consumer needs is making a difference in children’s advertising.”

Source:
L&R Fine Fashions, Inc., a Garden Grove, Calif., establishment, is recalling approximately 2,182 pounds of raw pork paste and ready-to-eat fried pork loaf products because they contain an undeclared allergen, wheat, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. Wheat is a known allergen, which is not declared on the label.

The products subject to recall include:
  • 11-ounce packages of "KIM LOAN GIÃ’ SÔNG PORK PASTE FISH SAUCE ADDED," bearing a lot number between"10-022" and "10-3351."
  • 14-ounce chubs of "KIM LOAN CHà CHIÊN FRIED PORK LOAF FISH SAUCE ADDED," bearing a lot number between "10-270" and "10-335."
Each product bears the establishment number EST. 40074 inside the USDA mark of inspection. The products subject to recall were produced between Jan. 22, 2010 and Dec. 6, 2010. These products were distributed to retail establishments in Southern California.
The problem was discovered by FSIS during a labeling review at the establishment. FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an allergic reaction should contact a physician.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumer and media with questions about the recall should contact the company's treasurer, R. Miller at (714) 971-5626.



I just saw that Elisabeth Hasselbeck has won her lawsuit that was filed against her by Susan Hassett. The U.S. District Court in Massachusetts could find no evidence that Hasselbeck had plagiarized Living With Celiac Disease by author Susan Hassett when writing her book The G-Free Diet.

I predicted this outcome some time ago, and am happy that Elisabeth won. Some people believe that any publicity for celiac disease is good publicity, but in this case I disagree.

Hopefully Elisabeth still has the desire to continue publicizing her book and celiac disease to the public, as there is really nobody else that I can think of who can command the kind of media attention as she can.
Update from Sarah Ann Harwick 12/03/2010:

"Because we seemed to be getting different answers from the MARS company, I decided to call back and speak with a manager about the recent "may contain wheat" warming I found on the Mint M&M's.

Only the Mint and Speckled (both holiday specials) are produced on the same lines as the pretzel M&M's, and although they do clean the lines between production, there is the possibility of cross contamination, which is why they now have the wheat warning on them.

She said all of the other M&M's are still gluten free."


Original Blog Post:

I just got this bit of bad news today. Unfortunately I've received some warnings from celiacs who have found that M&M's may no longer be gluten-free. A call to their customer service line still indicates that all M&M's are gluten-free (except for the new Pretzel M&M's), however, when you actually speak to a real person they will indicate that all M&M's are made on shared lines and may be cross-contaminated due to the fact that the pretzel M&M's are made on those lines.

I certainly hope that this is not the case, but early indications lead me to believe that this may be so.

I urge everyone to share your disappointment with this by calling them directly at: 800-627-7852.
For the past two years I've been busy writing something called, "The Better Bladder Book - A Holistic Approach to Healing Interstitial Cystitis & Chronic Pelvic Pain". IT is now OUT, AVAILABLE, and thankfully, getting GREAT Reviews! This makes me very happy, not because I'll make a bundle (I won't), but because people who need help can now find it. IC is a terrible disease affecting up to 8 million people in the US alone, but millions more suffer from chronic prostatitis, over-active-bladder, pelvic floor dysfunction, and chronic pelvic pain. Finally, the connection between between gluten intolerance and chronic inflammation in the body, which often leads to these kinds of problems, has been docoumented in two separate studies. My book tells you WHY, HOW, and what you can do about it. You can find more information on the book at the following website: www.thebetterbladderbookinfo.com. The best in health, Wendy Cohan, RN
I am very encouraged to see that the Huffington Post has written a new article on gluten sensitivity and its impact on the brain. The new article is correct in pointing out that gluten can have a severe impact on certain individuals who are sensitive to it. Hopefully this article will be covered by other papers around the country, as it is very important to convey this message to as many people as possible.

I've been writing about the gluten-brain connection for many years on this site, and you can find more information on this topic in this category:
Dr. Rodney Ford has also written extensively about this, most notably in his book The Gluten Syndrome - Is Wheat Causing You Harm?

Last, I include much about this topic in a book that I co-authored with Dr. Ron Hoggan called Cereal Killers:

I am very glad to see that these ideas are finally becoming more mainstream!
This just in from Jodi Walen:

"I just wanted to let you know that tonight I went to go buy my daughter the Milk Chocolate Carnation Instant Breakfast. As always, I read the label every time. Sad to say, this time the last ingredient listed now states 'wheat starch.' I can't tell you how upset I was to read this. Their website as of tonight does not list this as an ingredient. I have emailed the company. Please pass this on."

Let's all contact the company and let them know what a bad choice this ingredient change is!

Well whether we like it or not, the holidays really are upon us.  Many of us are already thinking about Thanksgiving dinner — some may be contently planning knowing they’ll be cooking their own gluten-free dinner, while others may be “white knuckling” it until Thanksgiving, worried they’ll get glutened by a well-meaning friend, family member or co-worker.  I, myself do not have celiac disease, although my daughter and brother do, and my dad eats gluten -free, and when I attended the General Mills blogger summit this week, I was really struck by a common word people were using: fear.  Fearful to get glutened, fearful (in some cases) to allow others to cook for them, fearful (in some cases) about being impolite and speaking up  if they can’t eat something.  It’s one thing to avoid a food because you’re on a diet for weight loss, it’s another thing to be scared of eating anything from a spread that could have a hidden “landmine” of gluten.

This post is for the people who want to cook for celiacs and the celiacs who want to drop them a casual hint :)

I have complied a list of things for these well-meaning family and friends to consider when offering to cook gluten-free for a person who has celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.

1. If you don’t understand it, please don’t do it.  We are okay with it!

It took many of us months and years to understand the gluten-free diet, cooking strategies and ways to prevent cross contamination before we really felt comfortable with it.  We don’t expect anyone to be an expert in a day.  And as a result that makes us fearful that any gluten-free food you make will actually contain gluten.  This is something some folks will never say to you for fear of being impolite.

Gluten-free means no wheat, barley, rye, oats (that aren’t guaranteed gluten free –hint if the ingredient label only says “oats” or “oat flour’ — it’s not guaranteed gluten free), spelt, durum, brown flour, malt, and more as reported by the Celiac Sprue Association. Corn, potatoes and rice are okay (unless the person is particularly sensitive to that as well).

2. If it’s baked and found in a mainstream grocery store, it’s probably not gluten-free

Yes, our grocery stores have come a long way when it comes to carrying gluten-free products.  But the only actual grocery store chain that is baking its own gluten-free bread is Whole Foods.  Any other grocery store is bringing in gluten-free bread or baked goods.

IF they have gluten-free bread, you usually will find it in the health food section freezer –not the bakery and not the bread section.  Pita bread, English Muffins, pizza crust, Italian bread, baguettes, bagels, cakes, pies (crusts have gluten), cupcakes all have gluten.  Bottom line:  unless you’re going to a specialty gluten-free bakery, you will likely not find any fresh-baked gluten-free goods at a mainstream grocery store.  And if you ask bakery people about it you’ll likely get a confused look or a quick no that they don’t have that available.

3.  How do you know your ingredients and utensils in your home aren’t already cross-contaminated with gluten?

Please honestly think about your cooking practices when I pose these questions:  Do you regularly double dip when cooking or baking?  In other words, do you use the measuring cup in your all-purpose flour and then just dip it  into the sugar?  If you’re double dipping, the sugar is contaminated  and no longer gluten free.  You can say the same for Crisco, butter, peanut butter, mayonnaise and anything you’re reaching in and scooping out. You may want to make divinity (which is inherently gluten free — eggs, sugar and corn syrup are the main ingredients I believe), but if your sugar is cross contaminated — a gluten-free person will get sick (or have damage in their gut) if they eat it.

What about while you’re cooking?  Do you use one utensil to stir up the gluteny turkey stuffing and then use the same spoon to scoop the sweet potatoes?

Your wooden or plastic cutting boards and your colanders are also off limits to people who eat gluten free– they harbor gluten in the nooks and crannies, that even when cleaned in the dishwasher, they aren’t “clean” for us.

4. I just won’t make stuffing and I’ll get an ice cream cake!

Whoa, you’re still going to have to look at your ingredients for cross contamination.  Plus you’re going to have to check to make sure you turkey or ham is gluten free (they can be injected with broths that contain gluten), and gravy is an issue.  Most premade gravy has gluten and anyone who makes it from home usually uses their flour as a thickener.  Corn starch is a viable option to make gluten-free gravy with turkey drippings, but just a forewarning — it’s clear and gelatinous– basically tastes fine, looks funky.

And if you’re doing an ice cream cake, you better make sure it’s gluten free.  Dairy Queen’s ice cream cake has crumbles in the middle which contain gluten. Have those removed and double check the other fudgy stuff in the center to make sure it’s gluten free and you’re set. Other places may have cookies or something inside their ice cream cakes too.

5. Let’s barbecue some ribs!

Again you must check the gluten contamination factor of your grill.  Do you put gluten on there?  In other words, do you put hamburger on there that has bread crumbs in it or grill your hamburger buns, or put steak on with a gluteny marinade?  If you don’t know– the only way to use the grill in this case is to put the gluten-free item on aluminum foil.  But also look for a gluten-free barbecue sauce.  We use Sweet Baby Ray’s.  Please keep in mind not all BBQ sauces are gluten-free.

6. Don’t assume

Read labels. Example:  Tostitos are gluten free— the label mostly talks about corn, oil and salt, but if you grab the one kind of Tostitos made form flour tortillas– that’s a problem.  Double check the label.  That one will say wheat in it.

Potatoes aren’t always just potatoes.  You’d think they should be, but if you’re getting something out of the frozen section, check ingredients!  Wheat will be listed if it’s in there — but gluten is NOT required to be put on a label if it is in a product.   Some frozen potatoes are just that, potatoes, go for the simple ones and stay away from the fancy flavored stuff.

Rice Krispies cereal seems simple enough, but in actuality it has malt. Gluten-free folks cannot eat this.

So what can you have around the house for a gathering?

Wine, coffee, Blue Diamond Nut Thins, cheese, or veggies with Wishbone Ranch dressing as the dip. Check out Trader Joe’s for some goodies:  They have a great list here which includes some sweets too!

None of us actually wants to think that our cooking would make someone sick.  But it is possible in this case — even to the cooks with the best of intentions.  Please be open to talking with your gluten-free family member or friend to see what they can do to help you make this as great experience as possible.


Dr. Peter Green and Elisabeth Hasselbeck will be featured in a piece on ABC News Nightline looking at celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.  The segment will air tonight, Thursday, November 4, Channel 7, 11:35 pm EST.  Check your local listing.

On Saturday October 16th the second annual Gluten Sensitivity & Celiac Forum will be held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Palo Alto, CA.  The event begins at 9 a.m. and ends at  4 p.m.  A light lunch is provided plus you can enjoy the many gluten-free delights from vendors around the area.

Our speakers are four national and international experts in the field of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease.
A new breakthrough in gluten laboratory testing will be presented by Dr Tom O’Bryan.  The new tests will provide higher sensitivity as well as a window into which systems of the body are being affected by gluten.

Dr Rodney Ford, pediatric gastroenterologist and prolific author from New Zealand will be joining us to share his most recent research and insights. Dr Ford will be presenting some startling information on the true nature of gluten and whether, in fact, it should be consumed by anyone.

Cynthia Kupper, registered dietician and founder of the nationally known Gluten Intolerance Group, will be providing valuable information on how best eat a nutrition-filled and healthy gluten-free diet.

Yours truly will also be speaking and I am excited to share some of the latest research about how gluten affects hormonal balance and predisposes us to various chronic degenerative diseases, plus what exactly can be done about it.

We have a larger venue this year as we were filled to capacity last year, but I would encourage that you reserve your seats early.  Tickets are $40 in advance, $50 at the door – you can reserve them at www.healthnowmedical.com. There is a discount for small groups so please call us at 408-733-0400 for more information.

This Forum is only presented annually so don’t miss it! We hope you will be able to join us. 
No more delays.  America's children deserve healthier lunches and students with celiac disease need access to gluten-free meals. 

Tell Congress to pass S. 3307, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act TODAY!

Take action at:
http://capwiz.com/celiac/issues/alert/?alertid=17854521
This will be my shortest blog. After a decade on The Specific Carbohydrate Diet, I am once again able to eat occasional moderate amounts of restricted sweets and starches with no apparent consequences. Since my celiac disease was never formally diagnosed, I cannot claim it is curable or was cured but it is now six weeks since I resumed eating foods I have not had in ten years as well as foods purported to be cross reactive with Latex Allergy. Ultimately I decided to be very cautious and not push the envelope since the SCD has been enjoyable and a great asset to regaining some resistance to chemical sensitivities. I also developed a real enjoyment of SCD recipes and still prefer many of them over their conventional counterparts. I am not suggesting others digress from their gluten free diets, just reporting what has happened in my case so far. Scott has suggested I monitor my maintenance with periodic blood tests for anti bodies and I plan to investigate that as it makes good sense. Finally, I do feel it is easier to maintain a proper weight with SCD although it is not a weight control program.

You may not be enjoying the gluten-free food to it’s fullest at Target Field.  The brand new home for the Minnesota Twins is complete with a gluten-free concession menu, but I’ve tracked down additional, more kid-friendly items that are gluten-free and — so far — aren’t on the list.

This list posted on my website has been about 5 months in the making.  I actually started drafting this post with a different title and all back before the first pitch of the season, but when I saw the special concessions list on the Twins website, I had so many questions that it has taken this long to get most of my questions answered.

If you go to the Twins website, you’ll find this page with gluten-free and vegetarian food items listed.  It is a very healthy list –with everything from fresh fruit to shrimp skewers and turkey legs.  Great!  It’s fantastic I am so glad there is something like this out there.  But I had some questions.  What about the junk?  What about the fun?  What about kid food?  I sent an email off to Pia McDonough, Operations Manager of Delaware North Companies, the company that runs the concessions.  I wrote in my email, that I was inquiring about

“kid-friendlier items — which are pretty important to parents trying to feed their kid gluten-free food — Mom and Dad probably like Shrimp Skewers but my 11-year-old celiac child would skip it.”

Here are my questions– with the answers:

Additional Gluten-Free Foods at Target Field

  • Are the nacho chips and cheese sauce gluten-free? Yes.  The chips are Old Dutch and the cheese sauce is gluten free as well. It is made by Gehls.
  • Cracker Jacks are gluten-free.  They should be on your list. And I gave her the FritoLay web address.
  • Would it be possible to find one stand that can serve gluten-free french fries?  A stand that doesn’t deep fry anything except for plain old fries? The answer on that one — NO.  So the fries are NOT GLUTEN FREE.  Hey — I gave it a shot!!
  • What about your ice cream novelties, have those been investigated for their gluten-free status?  A lot of ice cream is gluten-free if it doesn’t have cookies, malt or a cone. Confirmed the Push Up Fruit Bars and Premium Bars (vanilla ice cream on the inside, chocolate on the outside) are indeed gluten free.  — DO NOT get any novelties on a cone or cookie sandwich.
  • Kettle chips? Yes — they are gluten-free.  Brand is Rachel’s
  • North Shore Creamery, is that a company I should go through separately to ask about ice cream? Answer from McDonough:  “The North shore creamery is a branded name for our ice cream stands. They sell Land O Lakes soft serve which is gluten free.”
  • What about regular popcorn and cotton candy? (My popcorn-eater wouldn’t want Angie’s Kettle Corn). These two things she is still getting back to me on.

McDonough also confirmed the hot dogs are gluten-free without the bun, but THE HAMBURGER PATTIES ARE NOT GLUTEN FREE! I write that in caps because I often think that is so basic it should be gluten free, but McDonough says the ingredient label says “less than 2% wheat flour”.

As soon as I hear more about the popcorn and cotton candy I will update this post.  I really hope I hear soon.

The Gluten-Free Baseball Trend

The Gluten-Free food accommodations at ballparks is growing.  This spring the Sports Business Journal talked about the need to accommodate gluten-free diets at the Nation’s ballparks.  The high-profile gluten-free menus at Coors Field in Denver, Citi Field (home of the NY Mets), are done by the Aramark food service company.  You can see more about this company’s effort to make gluten free accommodations here.  Aramark even includes gluten-free buns with their gf hot dogs!  Now that’s nice.

Delaware North Companies doesn’t appear to tout its gluten-free concessions as much.  I’ve had to go to each team’s individual website to learn more.  And there wasn’t much out there.  While I didn’t ask McDonough about anything other than Target Field, I did do a separate email to Delaware North back in the spring and never heard back about the company’s gluten-free reach in other ballparks.

The gluten-free trend at ballparks and other major event venues is fantastic.  My only suggestion– When you’re researching and publishing your list, look more closely at things like popcorn, Cracker Jacks and other treats.  They may be easier than you think to confirm as gluten-free.

*Keep in mind these gluten-free food items in the above list could change.  If in doubt contact to the Twins or Delaware North. Be sure you allow enough time for a response.
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