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Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease

This category contains summaries of research articles that deal with cancer and lymphoma and their association with celiac disease. Most of the articles are research summaries that include the original source of the summary.

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    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--Pinni_b_01

    The connection between celiac disease and various types of cancer is well supported by scientific evidence. However, to date, there hasn’t been enough data to make accurate predictions of cancer risk in celiac patients. So, we don’t know exactly what the risk levels are for various types of cancer in celiac patients.



    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--Eva K.

    Researchers wanted to identify the predictors of celiac disease in patients presenting with D-IEL.



    Photo: CC--Eden Janine and Jim

    To determine which method yielded better diagnostic results, a research team set out to compare and contrast intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte cytometric pattern with subepithelial deposits of anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA for diagnosing lymphocytic enteritis due to celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--Parl

    People with celiac disease have higher rates of lymphoproliferative malignancy. Currently, doctors just don't know whether risk levels are affected by the results of follow-up intestinal biopsy, performed to document mucosal healing.



    Photo: CC--GDS Infographics

    Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATL) is a gut cancer that often ends in death. Currently, doctors have very little idea what factors might help patients survive. The way in which clinical presentation, pathological features and therapies influence EATL outcome was the subject of a recent study by a team of researchers.



    Photo: CC--National Eye Institute

    Currently, there is no cure for T-cell lymphoma, and no promising treatment exists for people who suffer from this condition. However, results of a new study suggest that new treatments for T-cell lymphoma my be on the horizon.



    Photo: CC--Paul Falardeau

    With all the problems that go along with celiac disease, it can be hard to see any benefits to having the disease. However, it would seem that such benefits do exist: a recent study in Sweden shows that women suffering from celiac disease are actually at a decreased risk of developing breast, endometrial and ovarian cancer.



    Photo: CC--greencolander

    A number of studies have found higher rates of lymphoma in people with celiac disease. However, few studies make any distinction between lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). A team of researchers recently investigated rates of various lymphoproliferative disorders in patients with celiac disease.



    Photo: CC-Lisa Brewster
    A number of small studies have shown a connection between celiac disease and various gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, but the results haven't been corroborated by larger studies, or by blood and biopsy analysis of large populations. That means that researchers just haven't been able to say with certainty what the results of those smaller studies might mean about cancer risks for the larger population.


    New AP&T study on celiac disease and risk of colorectal cancer.
    Celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of lymphoma and small bowel malignancy. Colorectal cancer is the most common gastrointestinal cancers in the United States, but most studies have not found no higher rates of colorectal cancer for people with celiac disease.


    According to this study 16% of those with lymphocytic duodenosis have celiac disease.
    A team of researchers recently conducted a prospective study the etiology of lymphocytic duodenosis. Among their findings are that sixteen percent of patients with lymphocytic duodenosis have celiac disease.


    New study on colorectal neoplasia and celiac disease
    People with celiac disease have higher risk for developing lymphoma and small bowel malignancy, though most studies have found no higher risk of colorectal cancer.


    A team of researchers recently set out to map the IL-15–driven survival pathway in human IELs, and to determine whether IL-15 triggered pathway in human intraepithelial lymphocytes represents a possible new target in type II refractory celiac disease and enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma.


    Human Pathology
    A research team recently concluded a clinicopathologic and array comparative genomic hybridization study on enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma.

    A team of clinicians recently described a case of immune modulation by non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a patient with two primary intestinal T-Cell lymphomas and long-standing celiac disease.

    Enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL)  is a rare type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma that is commonly associated with celiac disease.  A group at The Newcastle  Lymphoma Group in the  United Kingdom, evaluated data from newly diagnosed patients in Northern England and Scotland between 1994 and 1998, in search of increased overall survival (OS) rates and progression free survival (PFS) rates for EATL patients.

    People with silent celiac disease, those who test positive for celiac disease antibodies, yet show no clinical signs of the disease itself, do not face a higher risk for developing malignant cancers, according to results of a recent Finnish study.

    A microscopic compound commonly found in plant-based foods reduces inflammation and prevents the formation of cancerous lesions in the colon. The tiny molecule, called quercetin, is easily absorbed when people eat fruits and vegetables, and so requires no specialized supplements or drugs.

    An extensive recent survey of the Swedish cancer registry reveals that people with celiac disease face a 5-fold increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but that the risk has decreased by more than 50% over the last 40 years.

    Refractory celiac disease is a serious condition that occurs when symptoms and intestinal damage continue even when the patient consumes a gluten-free diet.

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