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Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment (Gluten-Free Diet)

This category contains a comprehensive overview that covers the information on diagnosing and treating celiac disease, including the latest research on the various new tests/screening techniques.
Note: The only medically acceptable treatment for celiac disease is a 100% gluten-free diet for life.

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    Photo: CC--Ilmicrofono Oggiono

    Current celiac disease call for a follow-up biopsy taken 1 year after diagnosis to monitor gut recovery. Many celiac patients show incomplete gut recovery at that time, but there’s not much research to help doctors figure out how significant this might be.



    Photo: CC--Shannon Kringen

    Many people with celiac disease know that gluten exposure can cause gut damage and trouble absorbing some vitamins and minerals, which can lead to serious deficiencies. However, even celiac who follow gluten-free diets may experience similar issues, including impaired vitamin and mineral absorption.



    Photo: CC--Andres Nieto Porros

    Of course, a strict gluten free diet is still the only safe and effective treatment for celiac disease. However, new drugs in development, some of which are currently being tested on humans, might allow people with celiac disease to safely eat gluten again, at least in small amounts.



    Photo: CC--James Emery

    A team of researchers recently set out to develop new evidence-based parameters for screening for growth disorders among children with celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--Labomikro

    Getting high-quality biopsy specimens is key to making accurate celiac disease diagnoses. Endoscopists may take either a single- or double-biopsy specimen with each pass of the forceps. Does it matter whether they take one or two? Is two better than one?



    Photo: CC--Torley

    Can a scientific equation based on immunohistochemical analysis of duodenal biopsies improve the diagnosis of celiac disease and potential celiac disease?



    Photo: CC--Kirian Foster

    Most people with celiac disease suffer from classic symptoms like weight-loss and diarrhea before diagnosis, right? Wrong. In fact, the most common medical issues for people with celiac disease might really surprise you.



    Photo: CC--Dennis Jarvis

    What an odd thing to say: “Do not mask the appearance of celiac disease.” Inferring that you keep on eating gluten, despite early signs of celiac disease, until you get enough damage to your intestines that it can be seen under a microscope. I totally disagree with this concept—but this is still a common belief of medical practitioners.



    Image: Wikimedia Commons--Samir

    Following a strict gluten-free diet is the only way to treat celiac disease. However, researchers have been lacking clear agreement on how and when to assess gluten-free dietary adherence in celiac patients or how to determine its effectiveness on villous atrophy.



    Photo: CC--Steven Depolo

    It is common for many people with celiac disease to have vitamin deficiencies. Eating a wide variety of foods such as meat, fish, eggs and vegetables can assist in with fixing those deficiencies. Children need vitamins to promote growth, development and good immune health. As adults we need them to prevent disease and stay healthy.



    Photo: CC--Orin Zebest

    Gluten comes from the Latin word for glue. It is a protein in wheat and other grains. It will elicit an autoimmune response in celiacs. Other grains like barley, rye and spelt contain gluten as well. In wheat products, the difficult part for celiacs to digest is gliadin. Some fad diets may try to claim glaidin is new, but it is not, and to dispel another myth there isn’t any wheat on the market that is genetically modified.



    Photo: CC--Liz West

    A research team recently examined the effects of prednisolone and a gluten-free diet on mucosal epithelial cell regeneration and apoptosis in celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--AJ Cann

    The human gastrointestinal tract contains approximately 1014 bacterial cells that form a unique, diverse and very dynamic microbial ecosystem also known as gut microbiota. The genomes of all intestinal microbes form the “microbiome”, representing more than 100 times the human genome.



    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--spain cordova

    Spotting celiac disease early is important for optimal patient outcome. However, serological markers of celiac disease aren't much good for spotting mild histopathological lesions in adults at risk for celiac.



    Photo: CC--kthm

    A team of researchers recently evaluated the usefulness of an on site rapid fingertip whole blood point-of-care test (POCT) that would help primary workers to spot patients who might benefit from further diagnostic tests for celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--Ken_Turner

    Data from blood studies suggest that about 1% or so of North Americans have celiac disease. However, there is no good screening data based on small intestinal biopsy performed during routine endoscopic evaluations.



    Photo: CC--WBUR

    The official stance of celiac disease experts is that doctors should recommend a dietitian for every patient with celiac disease. But, do dietitians actually improve the treatment outcomes of celiac disease?



    Photo: CC--jeporrier

    Doctors currently know very little about the best way to treat and manage cases of villous atrophy in patients without celiac disease.



    Image: Public Domain--Wikicommons

    Is an intestinal biopsy always necessary to diagnose celiac disease, or can diagnosis be made without biopsy? 



    Photo: CC--aurostar739

    A recent study of celiac screening methods shows that testing for antireticulin antibodies (ARA) in patients with celiac disease is obsolete. 


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