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Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment (Gluten-Free Diet)

This category contains a comprehensive overview that covers the information on diagnosing and treating celiac disease, including the latest research on the various new tests/screening techniques.
Note: The only medically acceptable treatment for celiac disease is a 100% gluten-free diet for life.

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    Photo: CC--rprata

    A diagnosis of Celiac disease is measured mainly by an adverse response to gluten, yet there is very little in the way of data regarding gluten challenge in adults on a gluten-free diet. A research team recently studied the kinetics of histological, serological, and symptomatic responses to gluten challenge in adults with celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--Horia Varlan

    A pioneering new testing system promises quick, accurate, cost-effective diagnosis and monitoring of celiac disease. The pioneering new test was developed with EU-funding, and should be available in hospitals and clinics across Europe and elsewhere within a few years.



    Photo: CC--Horia Varlan

    Diagnosing celiac disease can be challenging for doctors if a patient has already started a gluten-free diet, and/or when test results are inconsistent. A research team set out to evaluate the in vitro gliadin challenge in such patients.



    Photo: CC--IITA Image Library

    A trio of researchers recently compared duodenal and jejunal small intestinal biopsies for diagnosis and follow-up of celiac disease. The researchers included J.W. Meijer, P.J. Wahab, and C.J. Mulder from the Department of Pathology, Rijnstate Hospital Arnhem, The Netherlands.



    Photo: CC - timbrauhn
    anti-tTg levels at least 5x the upper limit of normal are sufficient to diagnose celiac even in adults; a biopsy is unnecessary.


    Photo: CC-R/DV/RS
    A company called Microtest Laboratories is manufacturing doses of what they claim may be the first effective vaccine treatment for celiac disease. At this point, the only treatment for celiac disease is to avoid gluten in the diet.


    Photo: CC - milos milosevic
    Detecting gluten sensitivity early in individuals can have major health benefits, preventing not only the development of celiac disease (that is, villous atrophy, according to Dr. Fine), but a wide array of autoimmune diseases and conditions such as osteoporosis, malnutrition, infertility, certain mental disorders, and even some forms of cancer.


    Photo: CC--MPClemens
    In an effort to understand how delayed celiac disease diagnosis became the norm for most patients over the last few decades, a research team conducted a study to assess the issue. Their study also looked at how delayed diagnosis affects health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for those with celiac disease, and considered differences with respect to sex and age.


    Photo: CC--Muffet
    A research team recently assessed variability in small bowel histopathology reporting between different pathology practice settings, and its impact celiac disease diagnosis.


    Photo: CC - spec-ta-cles
    Non-controlled studies suggest that Rifaximin may improve celiac disease symptoms in such cases. However, up to now, no controlled trials have been conducted.


    Photo: CC- Spirit-Fire
    Villous atrophy may be present only in the duodenal bulb, so a biopsy of this region should always be including when diagnosing celiac disease.

    A team of researchers set out to assess the clinical, pathological and serological spectrum of celiac disease in a general population via prospective study (Kalixanda study).


    Adherence to biopsy guidelines recommended by the AGA in 2006 - that at least four samples be submitted - doubles the probability of a celiac diagnosis.


    New research on using HLA-DQ2-gliadin tetramer test to detect celiac disease.
    In an effort to improve diagnosis of celiac disease in patients already on a gluten-free diet, a team of researchers recently evaluated HLA-DQ2-gliadin tetramers for detection of gluten-specific T cells in peripheral blood and histological changes in the duodenum after a short gluten challenge as a diagnostic tool.


    Photo-CC-aldenchadwick_thumb.jpg
    Question:  Do I have to re-introduce gluten in order to have an accurate gluten sensitivity test done?  Answer: Yes and No.  If a person knows they are sensitive to gluten and have gone on a
     gluten-free diet, and want to know if they can have gluten again, then a challenge is in order (reintroduce gluten).


    Tina Turbin is an author, researcher, and gluten-free advocate.
    As an author, researcher, and gluten-free advocate, I work hard to raise awareness for celiac disease and gluten issues, particularly when it comes to increasing the diagnosis rate. Part and parcel of improving diagnosis is proper testing. Evidence is mounting that indicates that blood testing may not be the most effective way to test for celiac disease, and I would recommend that people who suspect they have celiac disease to check with their doctors about other testing options.


    New celiac saliva screening study in JPGN.
    Driven by the high prevalence of celiac disease, a team of researchers based in Italy to assess a new, noninvasive disease screening strategy that would allow them to make an early diagnosis of celiac disease in 6- to 8-year-old children.


    New American Journal of Gastroenterology paper examines celiac disease prevention measures.
    A team of researchers recently compiled an overview of prevention measures and exploratory pharmacological treatments of celiac disease. Maud Pinier, Gregor Fuhrmann, Elena Verdu and Jean-Christophe Leroux comprised the research team.


    Important new FDA approval of celiac disease testing.
    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given 510(k) clearance for the first two fully automated gliadin tests featuring deamidated peptides for celiac disease. That means U.S. doctors and patients looking for accurate early diagnosis of celiac disease now have a state of the art celiac disease assay with both a high level of sensitivity and specificity.


    Photo: CC/Tandemracer
    Serological screening of healthy volunteers from around the world estimates that the prevalence for celiac disease is approximately 0.5%- 1% of the total population. However, a recent meta-analysis denotes that the actual ratio of known or undiagnosed celiac cases is closer to 1 in 7 people.

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