Ads by Google:


Categories

No categories found.

Ads by Google:


No popular authors found.
No popular articles found.

Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research

This category contains summaries of research articles that deal strictly with scientific research publications on celiac disease. Most of these research summaries contain the original source of the publication.

    (Page 3 of 18)   « Prev  1  2  
    3
      4  5  Next »

    Photo: Wikimedia Commons.

    A new blood test under development by researchers at Walter and Eliza Hall Institute can rapidly and accurately diagnose celiac disease without the prolonged gluten exposure needed for current tests.



    Photo: CC--R. Vore

    For many people with celiac disease, one of the numerous downsides of the condition is the constant threat of an adverse reaction triggered by accidental gluten consumption. Because reactions to gluten ingestion can be severe for some celiac patients, many clinicians are looking to see if anything can be done to lessen the effects gluten reactions in celiac patients once they have started.



    Photo: CC--hoyasmeg

    A team of researchers recently set out to assess the validity and effectiveness of near-patient celiac immunological testing in dietician-led celiac disease follow-up clinics, and to compare the results against standard laboratory immunological techniques.



    Photo: CC--mag3737

    More and more people are reporting gastrointestinal symptoms that improve when wheat and/or gluten are removed from the diet. There is a diverse group of people who avoid wheat and/or gluten (PWAWGs), and who predominantly self-diagnose prior to presenting for clinical evaluation for celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--antonella_baccaria

    According to a new article by a team of researchers, not all gluten protein is created equal. That is, not all gluten proteins trigger an immune response in people with celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--Bottled Void

    Using the standardized interview of Paykel, a team of researchers set out to examine the relationship of stressful events in patients diagnosed with celiac disease, and to compare them with a control group of gastroesophageal reflux patients.



    Bone Marrow Diagram: CC--Wikimedia Commons

    A patient with childhood celiac disease, who had undergone an allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) for chronic myelogenous leukemia, was able to safely resume eating gluten after his celiac disease vanished.



    Photo: CC--zebble

    By enabling researchers to link antibodies with specific diseases, a new method could help uncover and confirm environmental triggers for diseases such as celiac and autism.



    Photo: CC--Art Practice

    Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact the social activities and emotional states of some patients. A team of researchers recently set out to assess rates of altered eating behavior in celiac patients.



    Photo: CC--miheco

    Looking into the possibility that their NCWS patients might in fact be suffering from non-immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated wheat allergy, a team of researchers conducted a review their own earlier data regarding NCWS, with a corresponding review of relevant medical literature on NCWS.



    Photo: CC--jovike

    About 1 of of 100 Americans has celiac disease, but most cases remain undiagnosed, partly because of failure on the part of physicians to collect at least four specimens during duodenal biopsy, as per current recommendations.



    Photo: CC--barekim

    A a team of researchers recently tried to determine the optimal time window for gluten introduction in children. The answer looks like 5 to 6 months of age.



    Photo: CC--hill_josh

    A team of researchers recently set out to get some good clinical data that would tell them how common non-celiac gluten sensitivity actually is.



    Photo: CC-- Magic Robot

    A new study shows that alcohol related cerebellar degeneration can trigger gluten sensitivity in certain genetically susceptible individuals.



    Photo: CC--Keepingtime in CA

    A research team recently set out to explore the association between anti-secretory medication exposure and subsequent development of celiac disease.



    Image: Wikimedia Commons

    A gluten-free diet is till the only treatment for celiac disease, but a number of companies are working on pharmaceutical treatments. However, very little information exists bout the level of interest among patients in using a medication to treat celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--R.Vore

    A team of researchers recently set out to assesses the safety and efficacy of Aspergillus niger prolyl endoprotease (AN–PEP) to mitigate the effects of gluten in celiac patients.



    Image: Tissue Transglutaminase--Wikimedia Commons

    People with non-celiac gluten-sensitivity often report gut and non-gut symptoms shortly after eating gluten; symptoms disappear on gluten-free diets, although these patients have no serologic markers of celiac disease, and no intestinal damage. However, there is no evidence to suggest any changes to blood or mucosa in those individuals.



    Photo: CC--Pierre Metivier

    A team of researchers recently investigated the specific effects of gluten after dietary reduction of fermentable, poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates (fermentable, oligo-, di-, monosaccharides, and polyols [FODMAPs]) in patients with suspected non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS).



    Photo: CC--EMR

    There is evidence that certain types of gut trauma can trigger celiac disease, but almost nothing is know about whether traumatic brain injury might trigger a neurological form of celiac disease in some individuals.


    (Page 3 of 18)   « Prev  1  2  
    3
      4  5  Next »
    Celiac.com Sponsor: