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Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research

This category contains summaries of research articles that deal strictly with scientific research publications on celiac disease. Most of these research summaries contain the original source of the publication.

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    Photo: CC--J_Arrr!

    To better understand how control of effector T cells by regulatory T cells is inhibited, a team of researchers compared Treg numbers and responses of intestinal and peripheral T lymphocytes to suppression by Tregs in celiac disease patients and in a control group.



    Photo: CC--Thirteen Of Clubs

    Gluten sensitivity has recently been added to the spectrum of gluten-related disorders, but precise diagnostic markers do not yet exist. A research team recently set out to understand the blood test pattern of gluten sensitivity, and to compare it with the blood test pattern seen in celiac disease.



    Photo: cc--eddie 07

    For the first time, researchers looking for a link between gluten and the immune system have been able to visualize the connection, according to new research in the scientific journal, Immunity.



    Photo: CC--GE Healthcare

    Although most instances of gluten sensitivity manifest as a chronic, autoimmune disorder of the small intestine (celiac disease), around 10% of gluten sensitive patients suffer neurological symptoms. Usually these neurological symptoms accompany the more common intestinal issues, but some patients exhibit neurological symptoms exclusively. For this reason, it is thought that gluten-related symptoms in different parts of the body could be the result of autoimmune reactions to different members of the transglutaminase gene family. A recent lab study suggests that neurological gluten-related symptoms could be the result of an immune reaction to a particular neuronal enzyme known as TG6, and that this reaction occurs separate from other autoimmune reactions to gluten.



    Photo: CC--chrisinplymouth

    Currently, there is no convenient way for people with celiac disease to test food for gluten content. In an effort to change that, University researchers in Spain are developed an accurate, easy to use sensor that can test for gluten in food.



    Photo: Jefferson Adams

    The drug ALV003, a potentially promising treatment celiac disease, made by Alvine Pharmaceuticals, Inc., has received Fast Track designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).



    Photo: CC--shingleback

    A number of studies have shown that increased breastfeeding may provide some protection against celiac disease. Other studies show no significant difference in the prevalence of celiac disease between breastfed and non-breastfed patients. What's the deal?



    Photo: CC--teuobk

    A number of studies support the existence non-celiac gluten sensitivity, which can be marked by both internal and external symptoms in individuals with normal small-bowel mucosa and negative results on serum anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibody testing. These symptoms are very similar to traditional celiac disease symptoms, and seem to improve or disappear with the adoption of a gluten-free diet.



    Photo: CC--Daniel Paquet

    Last year, ImmusanT's Nexvax2 celiac disease vaccine passed its phase 1 clinical trials in Australia and New Zealand, causing a stir of hope and anticipation within the celiac disease community. It will still be a while before the vaccine is available to the public, but yesterday ImmusanT announced that it commenced phase 1b clinical trials in New Zealand and Australia and phase 1 clinical trials in the U.S.



    Celiac disease numbers in Western countries are currently somewhere in the 1:100 range, but this does not account for a host of non-celiac gluten intolerant people. For many, it is common knowledge that gluten and wheat intolerance manifests in a variety of forms, and not all of them are diagnosable as celiac disease. This has not prevented the existence of such non-celiac wheat sensitivities from being debated in scientific circles though. A double-blind placebo-controlled study spanning 2001-2011 demonstrates that wheat sensitivity exists as a distinct clinical condition, separate from celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--Håkan Dahlström.

    A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether testing IgG and IgA antibodies Against native gliadin was best for diagnosing celiac disease in children under 2-years old. Specifically they wanted to compare the performance of assays for anti-nGli, anti-dGli, anti-tTG, and EmA in this age group.



    Photo: CC--SidPix2

    One of the least talked about symptoms of celiac disease in children is a delaying of sexual maturation. Previous studies have established this effect, but they have not clearly explored whether treatment of celiac disease (via gluten-free diet) can restore sexual maturation to a normal rate.



    Photo: CC--a.drian

    Failure to conduct small bowel biopsies during endoscopy, especially on men and people of color, may be one of the reasons that celiac disease remains under-diagnosed in the United States, according to a new study.



    Between 1984 and 1996, Sweden experienced a celiac disease epidemic: celiac disease rates shot up to four times normal levels, then dropped just as abruptly ten years later. This is interesting because it shows that there is some environmental cause for the disease, but the nature of that cause is proving hard to pinpoint.



    Photo: CC--Gonzo Charles

    A research team recently set out to study how bone mineral density correlates with duodenal Marsh stage in newly diagnosed adult celiac patients. The team made up of A. García-Manzanares, J.M. Tenias, and A.J. Lucendo.



    Photo: CC--Valerie_Everett

    A group of researchers recently set out to study cases of positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies with negative endomysial antibodies to determine whether or not such cases amount to celiac disease.



    Photo: CC - Cuito Cuanavale

    There have been several studies of celiac disease sufferers and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), but few of these studies have focused on children. Since diseases that develop through childhood (as celiac disease often does) usually negatively impact physical, social and psychological development, it is important to determine the extent to which celiac children suffer as a result of the disease.



    Photo: CC -- Emeraldimp

    In general, doctors and researchers know a good deal about how celiac disease works, and they are finding out more all the time. However, they know very little about non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS).



    Photo: CC--Certified Su

    In a new study, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) addressed whether the genetic risk of the most common medical conditions, including celiac disease, stems from many rare mutations that each confer a high degree of risk in various people, or from common differences throughout the genome that modestly influence risk.



    Photo: CC--Nathan Reading

    From what we understand about celiac disease, both genetic and environmental factors play a part in its development: people with certain genetic dispositions are more likely to develop it, but studies of high-risk twins have shown that in 25% of cases, only one of the twins will develop the disease.


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