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Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research

This category contains summaries of research articles that deal strictly with scientific research publications on celiac disease. Most of these research summaries contain the original source of the publication.

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    Photo: CC--AJC1

    To determine if the probiotic Bifidobacterium natren life start (NLS) strain might affect the treatment and clinical features of patients with untreated celiac disease, a team of researchers recently conducted an exploratory, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study on the effects of Bifidobacterium infantis natren life start super strain in active celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--winnifredxoxo

    People with celiac disease must follow a gluten-free diet if they want to remain healthy, but a 200-patient study conducted by Alvine Pharmaceuticals show that 90 percent of celiac patients who followed a gluten-free diet still reported symptoms of the disease.



    Photo: CC--rkramer62

    Scientific evidence indicates that the risk of developing celiac disease cannot be explained solely by genetic factors. There is some evidence to support the idea that the season in which a child is born can influence the risk for developing celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--INEEDCoffee.com

    A synthetic stool substitute was recently used as part of a "proof-of-principle" study to successfully clear C. difficile infections in 2 patients via fecal transplant therapy.  A synthetic stool may lead the way to "off-the-shelf" fecal transplant therapy eliminating the need for individual healthy feces donors and screening tests.  An "off-the-shelf" synthetic stool would greatly facilitate large scale fecal transplant therapy studies and clinical trials.  Fecal transplant therapy for celiac disease could readily be investigated.



    CC--Leo Reynolds

    To better understand the relationship between mucosal healing and mortality in celiac disease, a research team set out to determine whether persistent villous atrophy is associated with mortality in celiac disease patients.



    Photo: CC--CeresB

    Ever wonder what happens to all those celiac disease patients who volunteer to do a gluten-challenge in the name of science? Well, the short answer is that they likely suffer, and may incur gut damage, at least in the short term.



    Photo: CC--Carolina Biological Supply

    Currently, doctors diagnose celiac disease with blood tests that screen for two antibodies, one that targets gluten and another that goes after an intestinal protein. The tests work pretty well to spot advanced cases of celiac disease, but by that time, patients are already suffering intestinal damage.



    CC--Mervi Eskelanin

    Up-regulation of T-bet and phosphorylated signal transducers and activators of transcription (pSTAT)1 are key transcription factors for the development of T helper type 1 (Th1) cells, and have been found in the mucosa of patients with untreated celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--Lab212

    Sweden has seen a sharp rise in cases of celiac disease in children under two years of age. A research team recently studied the possible connection between early infections and celiac disease, along with their possible role in the explosion of celiac cases in Swedish children.



    CC--Horia_Varlan

    Currently, doctors must still use invasive techniques to distinguish between uncomplicated and complicated forms of celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--barryskeates

    In people with celiac disease, eating wheat, barley, or rye triggers inflammation in the small intestine. Left unchecked, this inflammation causes the gut damage that is associated with untreated celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--The Pale Side of Insomnia

    A research team wanted to test the hypothesis that additional celiac disease gene sites exist within the extended major histocompatibility complex (xMHC).



    Photo: CC--Pat McDonald

    To better understand how interactions between SIgA and CD71 promote transepithelial transport of gliadin peptides, a team of researchers set out to determine if interactions among secretory immunoglobulin A, CD71, and transglutaminase-2 affect permeability of intestinal epithelial cells to gliadin peptides.



    Photo: CC--cliff1066

    In celiac disease, doctors use video capsule endoscopy (VCE) mainly to follow-up on stubborn cases, and to diagnose adenocarcinoma, lymphoma or refractory celiac disease. However, some doctors are suggesting that VCE could replace standard esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and biopsy in certain circumstances.



    Photo: CC--J_Arrr!

    To better understand how control of effector T cells by regulatory T cells is inhibited, a team of researchers compared Treg numbers and responses of intestinal and peripheral T lymphocytes to suppression by Tregs in celiac disease patients and in a control group.



    Photo: CC--Thirteen Of Clubs

    Gluten sensitivity has recently been added to the spectrum of gluten-related disorders, but precise diagnostic markers do not yet exist. A research team recently set out to understand the blood test pattern of gluten sensitivity, and to compare it with the blood test pattern seen in celiac disease.



    Photo: cc--eddie 07

    For the first time, researchers looking for a link between gluten and the immune system have been able to visualize the connection, according to new research in the scientific journal, Immunity.



    Photo: CC--GE Healthcare

    Although most instances of gluten sensitivity manifest as a chronic, autoimmune disorder of the small intestine (celiac disease), around 10% of gluten sensitive patients suffer neurological symptoms. Usually these neurological symptoms accompany the more common intestinal issues, but some patients exhibit neurological symptoms exclusively. For this reason, it is thought that gluten-related symptoms in different parts of the body could be the result of autoimmune reactions to different members of the transglutaminase gene family. A recent lab study suggests that neurological gluten-related symptoms could be the result of an immune reaction to a particular neuronal enzyme known as TG6, and that this reaction occurs separate from other autoimmune reactions to gluten.



    Photo: CC--chrisinplymouth

    Currently, there is no convenient way for people with celiac disease to test food for gluten content. In an effort to change that, University researchers in Spain are developed an accurate, easy to use sensor that can test for gluten in food.



    Photo: Jefferson Adams

    The drug ALV003, a potentially promising treatment celiac disease, made by Alvine Pharmaceuticals, Inc., has received Fast Track designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).


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