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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

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  1. Past Hour
  2. Glad to help!   Never stop advocating for your health.  Be patient (that's the really hard part), but it is possible to feel well and recover from celiac disease.  Of course, you'll always have to avoid gluten as if it were rat poisoning, but there are worst things to worry about!    It is nice to have a resource like Celiac.com.  It is anonymous, so you don't have to be embarrassed about asking what you may think are dumb questions.   Hang in there!  
  3. Well, that is just wheat. Their bars/squares might be wheat free, as well, but the culprit there is barley.    Also I just got this reply: For legal reasons the information that has been provided is the only information we are authorized to provide you with.  To reiterate, our products are not certified as being gluten free. FDA requires products to be tested to confirm that gluten level is below 20ppm. Currently, Ghirardelli products have not been tested to this requirement and therefore, we do not make any gluten free claims for our products. Sincerely,  Ghirardelli Consumer Services
  4. Today
  5. They seem to be good about saying things may contain wheat when their products are made on shared equipment, for example their ground chocolate which I no longer use.   This is the reply I got a year ago (March 2015) when asking about their 60% cacao chips. "Dear Consumer, There is no wheat in our 60% chips and no wheat in our chips facility, as such, no wheat is run on the same line as any of our chips. Sincerely, Consumer Affairs Response Team"  
  6. Yesterday
  7. Thank you so much for the info, I did replace all my cooking wares and I did just recently stop dairy (about 3 weeks ago). I guess I have to keep it going, thank you once again, this give me more courage to continue my quest in feeling better.
  8. Hey guys,  I emailed Ghirardelli to ask about their updated allergen information because I had heard that people stopped recommending most of their products. I was specifically asking about their chocolate chips because my understanding is that they are free of gluten and not made on the same lines as that one bar/square that contains barley. This is what I received back: "Thank you for contacting Ghirardelli Chocolate Company.  We appreciate your interest in finding out about the ingredients in our products and your interest in a gluten free product. At this time we do not offer any "gluten free" products, but appreciate your interest in seeing whether Ghirardelli offers one.  Our products are not certified as being gluten free. FDA requires products to be tested to confirm that gluten level is below 20ppm. Currently, Ghirardelli products have not been tested to this requirement and therefore, we do not make any gluten free claims for our products. Please reference the ingredient information, on our packaging for any Ghirardelli product that you are interested in, to determine if it is suitable for you. Please know you are a valued consumer and we do appreciate your interest in our products. Sincerely, Consumer Affairs Response Team"   I asked them to please clarify - are your products testing over 20ppm? Or you don't test them at all? I also asked about the lines that the chocolate chips are made on because the ingredients do not indicated any problems. The customer service rep sent me the exact same message back with one of the lines underlined. I emailed again, and they don't seem to want to disclose any more information.   Has anyone else had any luck talking with them lately? Insights on the chocolate chips?
  9. I was diagnosed with blood tests in October with celiac.  My numbers were all so positive and high, and therefore, elected not to go through with the biopsy.  He diagnosed with my celiac then. However aftrr 3 months of pain , I did go though wiith the biopsy.  My doctor said I didn't even need to go back on gluten which was fabulous for me.  He said with the numbers that I have, the pain I am in, he has no doubts I sill have damage.  So, that is what I did.  No gluten challenge here. I was happy that virtually everything was good. Stomach was great. However, I did have "duodenal mucosal changes" -- which were "supicious' for celiac.  Now we wait for the biopsy samples to come back.  
  10. Hello I'm hoping to speak to others with this DH. I've had a recurring rash on my elbows that has appeared several different times in the past year. Most of the time it's just on my right elbow, sometimes on both. Very itchy and has clear liquid if scratched or squeezed and feel feverish just in the one spot. Maybe 15-20 bumps each time all grouped together. I've had eczema since I was little, but I haven't had an eczema flare up in years, and this is nothing like anything I've had before. I keep coming across DH and the symptoms sound so similar but a lot of the pictures I've found look much worse than what I have so I'm just not sure. Any suggestions you might have as to what this could be would be super appreciated!! 
  11. Just came back from a pediatric GI doctor with my 12 year old. the doctor told me that Chris' IgA level of 45 is too low and normal range for his age is 70. Although the standard Celiac panels came back negative twice, he wants another done with TTG and IgG.
  12. only the first one is a celiac test.  and you need the rest of them run.  What country are you in?
  13. If you follow the gluten-free diet correctly, without being paranoid about it either......your DGP will drop because you won't be eating the food that makes it rise.  I think having a gluten-free house is a great idea because it allows you to relax in your own home. As for reading labels all the time, I have a few comments on that one.  In the beginning, and depending on just how much processed foods you plan on eating, it is a good idea to get into the habit of reading labels.  You learn how to do that correctly from experience.  However, in 11 years gluten free, I have never once seen any processed food I have bought that changed their ingredients. I'm sure it can happen but I've never seen it. Usually, with higher end brands, they never do that because if the product is a success, they don't mess with it.  I can't speak for generic or store brands because I do not buy them. I do not eat a lot of processed foods either. If you are buying a product specifically geared towards the Celiac population and is certified gluten-free, you do not have to check the label unless you have other food intolerance's. Glutino and the other companies which market a gluten-free line of products will not change their ingredients and put something in there we cannot have. Whole Foods Market Gluten Free Bakery line....same thing.  They are all dedicated facilities that make food for Celiac's and are not a worry. I am from New England and buy B & M baked beans, which are gluten free. They are a New England company and haven't changed their recipe for years and years...in fact, maybe never.  Those beans are an institution around here and they will not change their ingredients that have been popular for a very long time.....they have been around since my great-grandmother's time. I buy the basic ones without the added flavorings like onion, etc. I can't speak for every flavor they produce because I eat only the basic beans. But I no longer check the label....don't have to. The company specifically told me they don't mess with success and would not change ingredients. Supplements are something you need to read labels on every time but food items are a little different and you will become very good at understanding the whole thing the longer you do it. It becomes second nature. I am very happy you are on your way to a much healthier life! 
  14. Kansas is wheat country, and like the rest of America, Kansans are generally not gluten-free. That means the food in their charity food pantries are not usually gluten-free. View the full article
  15. This is a link that will explain sreun panels for infants under 2 years of age. http://www.thepatientceliac.com/2013/04/18/update-on-celiac-disease-screening-in-infants-and-toddlers/ The author of that is a doctor, has celiac herself, and is a member of celiac.com. Here is a link that tells you about her: http://www.thepatientceliac.com/about-me/   This link will also give you information: http://www.beyondceliac.org/living-with-celiac-disease/info-for-parents/testing/ Quoting from it in part: Celiac Disease Testing in Children Under 3 Blood tests are not always accurate in very young children. If your child is less than 3 years old, you may be advised to see a gastroenterologist instead of relying on blood tests results.
  16. That was not a full celiac blood panel that was done. Plus, as I understand it, at that age the DGP is more likely to be high rather than the others. Here is the full celiac blood panel: Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgA Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgG Anti-Endomysial (EMA) IgA Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) IgA Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) IgA and IgG Total Serum IgA    Also can be termed this way: Endomysial Antibody IgA Tissue Transglutaminase IgA  GLIADIN IgG GLIADIN IgA Total Serum IgA  Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) IgA and IgG  
  17. Just remember that the ingredients may be different in different countries.
  18. cadbury eggs?

    According to last year's Coeliac UK Food and Drink Directory they both are safe foods for us - I haven't got this year's though.   I do react  if I am glutened but have never had any problem with Creme Eggs - and  I bought some just after Christmas.  If you are anywhere else in the world maybe they change the ingredients but I would say you are fine in the UK..     
  19. Specializing in celiac disease and the gluten-free diet, Steenwyk suggested that Giacomaro start a support group for teens that they could lead ... View the full article
  20. Students who have celiac disease or other medical conditions that require them to stick to a gluten-free diet must go through Concordia's Disability ... View the full article
  21. According to RelioOn, they do offer Gluten free glucose tablets website info   Lar
  22. Good idea! Add also the lactulose - mannitol test, to confirm they are/are not experiencing leakyness in the gut, then correlate the results with the symptoms (obviously digestive symptoms would have to be excluded, because diarrhea and bloating will probably be present anyway, due to having damaged intestines). You see, ironically it would be "gluten-free challenge", because possibly systemic symptoms ("leaky gut syndrome")  and GI symptoms start after going IV fluids -> gluten-free (instead of "gluten challenge", which would be gluten-free -> gluten).        
  23. "Pre-Celiac" & scared

    PPIs should not affect your digestion of gluten one way or another. Many folks with celiac disease may have villous damage without obvious symptoms. Others eventually get symptoms after the disease is "activated," but exactly how or why this happens is not yet clearly understood. Biopsies are generally done after someone has symptoms, and likely already has villous damage, so I would imagine your doctor must be necessarily a bit vague about whether you might have "inactive" or "active" celiac disease. The gold standard is to get a biopsy while still eating gluten, and then another after being on a gluten-free diet for some time, to assess whether you heal without gluten in your system. Positive genes and blood work, AND villous atrophy would seem like fairly strong evidence, but that's up to your doctor to determine. If you feel comfortable sharing your test results on the forum, some folks here can give you their two cents. But listen to your doctor! Glutenease might help your digestion, but if you have an autoimmune reaction to gluten, it won't prevent the possible damage that comes with gluten mistakes. Research on l-glutamine is somewhat supportive for healing, but it's not a panacea.  You will read about various levels of sensitivity and prudence here and elsewhere. Eventually you'll come up with a plan that you consider is "safe," but hopefully will still let you get out in the world. Read up on gluten-free groceries and how to deal with restaurants safely, and you ought to be able to find a happy "middle-path" between prudence and paranoia. I'm one of the fairly sensitive/paranoid types at this point in my life. I personally don't worry too much about possibly breathing in gluten, but on the other hand I wouldn't eat anything that's been out where flour is in the air. Nor would I use a shared toaster or fryer. Again, it's important that you form a lifestyle approach that is informed about the risks but still a good life! Most importantly, work with your medical team to determine if you in fact have celiac disease.
  24. We are utilizing the "our kitchen is completely gluten free" and DEFINITELY checking every label every time methods. SO glad to hear my DGP should drop!!!! 
  25. Without reference ranges for the IgA there's no telling wether the IgA or tTG are anything worth while.  I think your best bet is to wait on a call from them for interpretation. I know that's hard but really, they are the ones with all the necessary information.  
  26. Hello all, new to this site!  My 10 month old son was referred to an endocrinologist as he has consistently failed to chart in both weight and height.  After discussing his symptoms with the endocrinologist (fussiness after eating, diarrhea) she suggested it could be Celiac disease.  She ordered several blood tests to which I have received results that I am not quite sure how to interpret (and of course I haven't heard back and she hasn't returned my messages).  The following abnormal test results I received: Immunoglobulin A:  Less than 8 mg/dl IgA TTG Antibody:  Negative (I've read this can be a false negative if he is IgA deficient?) SGOT/AST:  93 U/L (standard 25-55) SGPT/AST:  49 U/L (standard 13-45) IgF-1/Somatomedin-C:  Less than 25 ng/ml (standard for age range 16 days to 1 year is 55-327) Any insight into what these results mean would be extremely helpful and appreciated!  Also, my son has been exclusively breastfed; if he does, in fact, have Celiac disease is gluten transferred through breast milk? 
  27. Hello all, new to this site!  My 10 month old son was referred to an endocrinologist as he has consistently failed to chart in both weight and height.  After discussing his symptoms with the endocrinologist (fussiness after eating, diarrhea) she suggested it could be Celiac disease.  She ordered several blood tests to which I have received results that I am not quite sure how to interpret (and of course I haven't heard back and she hasn't returned my messages).  The following abnormal test results I received: Immunoglobulin A:  Less than 8 mg/dl IgA TTG Antibody:  Negative (I've read this can be a false negative if he is IgA deficient?) SGOT/AST:  93 U/L (standard 25-55) SGPT/AST:  49 U/L (standard 13-45) IgF-1/Somatomedin-C:  Less than 25 ng/ml (standard for age range 16 days to 1 year is 55-327) Any insight into what these results mean would be extremely helpful and appreciated!  Also, my son has been exclusively breastfed; if he does, in fact, have Celiac disease is gluten transferred through breast milk? 
  28. Last week
  29. Leaky Gut aka intestinal hyperpermeability, is very much a real condition, and there are existing scientifically credible tests to measure the degree of permeability. (see lactulose-mannitol test). Now whether or not various conditions are caused by this, is an entirely different question. While an IV based elemental diet might help identify the GI as the culprit, it's both costly and not sustainable. So I fail to see what is gained. You can just as well do a water fast, and reach the same conclusions.
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