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jka8168

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About jka8168

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  1. I haven't seen the Vojdani/Cyrex tests fail yet, meaning specifically the saliva and gluten related blood test used together in order to check the most possible gluten related antibodies. Array 1 and Array #3 I have seen some very very sick people finally get their positive gluten syndrome diagnosis with these tests after numerous other false negative tests. Dr. O'Bryan's research reviews are just that. Research reviews. Hundreds of articles from mainstream journals. Some are pretty helpful and informative. No financial interest.
  2. I am very interested in communicating with bluec66. I see you had a hard time with gluten exposure a few months back and may have reacted to either withdrawal or reexposure...depression, etc.? You said that eating a little gluten made you feel better. Can you please contact me and catch me up as to what you have done since then and how it has worked out? My email is info@theglutensyndrome.net Thanks, Mrs. Olive Kaiser
  3. Some folks seem to feel that since wheat is mentioned positively in the Scriptures, it can't be a bad food for us. I have some thoughts on that but wondered what others have to say.
  4. Where would we be without Him? Yes, I belong to Jesus, thank you Lord! Question for all? How do you see the gluten problems from a Scriptural perspective?
  5. I think you must have moved your request to another thread labeled Quest vs. Prometheus, but I'll put a copy of my reply here as well. We got caught without enough info at first, and I took my son who has type 1 diabetes in for a test without calling ahead. I asked them to use a lab recommended by a major celiac disease center, but they talked me into Quest. The results came back very quickly as negative, and I questioned them. My son reacted strongly to gluten as a baby and now is diabetic and ADHD. My husband is positive for celiac disease. I called the celiac disease center and they were definite that I should NOT use Quest. So I'm having his tests rerun right now and am waiting for the results. Although I'm getting the idea that the only results you can take seriously are the positive ones. A negative may or may not mean that you can eat gluten. I've spoken with so many people who had negative results, or even negative biopsies, and found they did so much better off gluten anyway. Research hasn't got the whole picture clear in that area. ********** I called a well known Celiac Disease Program and specifically asked whether I should allow my son's dr to use Quest for his bloodwork. I received a firm negative, and Prometheus was highly recommended. This Center also lists Mayo Clinic and Specialty Labs as appropriate. I also have spoken with a support group leader whose sister got a false negative from Quest and retested positive later. I called Prometheus directly and spoke with customer service. They will send the transport kits to either the dr or patient, and will process the tests if specimens are returned with a dr's script and direct payment or (accepted) insurance info. They give a discount for cash forms of payment (20-25% I think). I remember that the Panel including Total IGA if needed was around $217 with cash discount. It is important to call the dr ahead of time. He may not have an account with Prometheus, and some drs don't want to bother in that case because direct payment from the patient does not give their billing system a way to add their cut to the billed office visit amount. In that case, find a dr who has an account with Prometheus or who will work with you regarding payment options. If you don't call ahead, your specimens will go to a lab with which the dr has an account. Once the blood is drawn, it's too late to specify. Many regular labs may be licensed to do the test, but the results are very dependent on skilled operator procedures. Many techs haven't run enough tests yet to be that skilled. They may or may not run or read your test correctly. I got this info from a registered dietitian who works with a celiac disease program. Prometheus Labs # is 888-423-5227. Hope this helps, Olive
  6. I called a well known Celiac Disease Program and specifically asked whether I should allow my son's dr to use Quest for his bloodwork. I received a firm negative, and Prometheus was highly recommended. This Center also lists Mayo Clinic and Specialty Labs as appropriate. I also have spoken with a support group leader whose sister got a false negative from Quest and retested positive later. I called Prometheus directly and spoke with customer service. They will send the transport kits to either the dr or patient, and will process the tests if specimens are returned with a dr's script and direct payment or (accepted) insurance info. They give a discount for cash forms of payment (20-25% I think). I remember that the Panel including Total IGA if needed was around $217 with cash discount. It is important to call the dr ahead of time. He may not have an account with Prometheus, and some drs don't want to bother in that case because direct payment from the patient does not give their billing system a way to add their cut to the billed office visit amount. In that case, find a dr who has an account with Prometheus or who will work with you regarding payment options. If you don't call ahead, your specimens will go to a lab with which the dr has an account. Once the blood is drawn, it's too late to specify. Many regular labs may be licensed to do the test, but the results are very dependent on skilled operator procedures. Many techs haven't run enough tests yet to be that skilled. They may or may not run or read your test correctly. I got this info from a registered dietitian who works with a celiac disease program. Prometheus Labs # is 888-423-5227. Hope this helps
  7. One last comment, my husband, whom I mentioned in the last post, had breakouts on his back and shoulders also. Olive
  8. Hi, I'm new to this board, and surely no expert, but some of the rashes, pimples, etc. that are being discussed here remind me of reactions that can happen when the body is cleansing itself of toxins. The skin is a cleansing organ, and sometimes the toxins are eliminated through the skin as well as the more normal routes, ie, the digestive tract, kidney, liver process, etc. I've seen this happen more than once, sometimes to a strong degree, when a person who had been on a "junky American" diet, started taking even a natural multiple food/vitamin supplement. You could wonder if the first thing the body does when it's given a chance to improve itself is clean house and get rid of the toxins that are hanging around. Folks with digestive issues often have bodies that have not been able to cleanse normally or properly due to digestive imbalances/possibly constipation issues/etc. for a long time before going gluten-free. Once they remove the gluten and give their bodies a chance to heal and return to normal function, "carrying out the trash" through any available exit including the skin may be a predictable reaction. Over time, sometimes a weeks or months, this reaction may taper off. Alternative health enthusiasts are very familiar with this dynamic and have lots of concoctions to help aid of speed this process. It's wise to take it slowly or get a reliable alternative practicioner to recommend/supervise a detox program so you don't overdo it and put too much stress on yourself. I make that recommendation after an unusually severe reaction my husband suffered 10 years ago. (BTW, my husband, who got a positive blood test for celiac disease just weeks ago.) He has spent the last 35 years chronically constipated, and consequently very toxic. He drank a mug of herbal cleansing tea that did not bother other "normal" family members. He broke out with a rash and ended up with large weeping sores on his arms and lower legs. This was accompanied by fever, and general malaise. After missing too much work trying to let it run it's course, (you how men hate to see drs) he dragged himself in, and the puzzled dr stated that he had an "urecognizable systemic infection", and prescribed antibiotics. We are so relieved to find the underlying reason for the problems my husband and some of our kids experience. We are currently in the testing process. Olive