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kosherkid

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About kosherkid

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  1. Yes, and they come back right away if I eat something I shouldn't have. (Unfortunately I usually can't tell what the culprit was. It rarely happens, and usually it has been after eating at someone else's house.) David
  2. I have the same problem much of the time, and I didn't before being gluten free . They are now also almost always soft - much harder to wipe my bottom David
  3. Those were my main symptoms as well. That I have have Celiac was highly suggested by blood work, and confirmed with a biopsy. Both of those symptoms went away with going gluten-free, and how I can tell if I ate something with gluten. For me it they also occurred when I tried to eat oats, that were certified gluten free, so I don't eat oats either. David
  4. It's possible. I became very intolerant of beans after becoming gluten free. David
  5. I seem to have sort of the opposite problem. I was eating a lot of fiber, I had lots fresh carrots and apples most every day. I also liked having ground flax with my rice (to add in nutrients.) (If you don't grind the flax it will just pass on through .) I have stopped eating so much of the carrots and the flax, but it hasn't seemed to make to much of a difference . David
  6. I also was just recently diagnosed with severe osteopenia/borderline osteoporosis. (I am a 46 yo male.) My internist also wanted me to start Fosomax, but I wasn't too excited by the idea. I decided to talk to a friend of mine out of town who is endocrinologist at Harvard. He said under no circumstances should I take Fosomax, it is the exact opposite of what I need. (He said that I should also know that he perscribe tons of Fosomax, so that he isn't anti-Fosomax, it just not what someone with Celiac should be taking.) Fosomax stops the breakdown of of the bone, which for someone with Celiac is just a way of getting calium, which is not the issue many women have after meopause. If you don't allow the body to get it from the bones, there is no other source, so you body will become hypocalcemic, and your nerves won't function. So you need to make sure that you get lots of calcium in your diet, as well as few other vitamins and minerals probably, like folic acid and vitamin D. After being gluten-free for a while your intestines should improve and you will do better at absorbing the nutrients you are eating. David
  7. I also was just recently diagnosed with severe osteopenia/borderline osteoporosis. (I am a 46 yo male.) My internist also wanted me to start Fosomax, but I wasn't too excited by the idea. I decided to talk to a friend of mine out of town who is endocrinologist at Harvard. He said under no circumstances should I take Fosomax, it is the exact opposite of what I need. (He said that I should also know that he perscribe tons of Fosomax, so that he isn't anti-Fosomax, it just not what someone with Celiac should be taking.) Fosomax stops the breakdown of of the bone, which for someone with Celiac is just a way of getting calium, which is not the issue many women have after meopause. If you don't allow the body to get it from the bones, there is no other source, so you body will become hypocalcemic, and your nerves won't function. So you need to make sure that you get lots of calcium in your diet, as well as few other vitamins and minerals probably, like folic acid and vitamin D. After being gluten-free for a while your intestines should improve and you will do better at absorbing the nutrients you are eating. Good luck, and I hope you start to see improvement soon. David
  8. I also am extremely frustrated by the seeming lack of any progress. I started my gluten-free diet this past February and am very good at not eating things that are a problem. Just to be sure I also now either just eat fresh foods or foods I make myself, and I still don't seem to improving much. I just had a second biopsy, and it is a little better than the first one 6.5 months ago, which was something at least. I feel like I can't eat anything, and I am already fairly thin, and don't really have any weight to loose. David
  9. Me too, at least at means I'm not totally crazy . I started be gluten-free this past February. After that when I ate chummus, it was NOT good , I thought maybe it was something else that I ate, or who knows what as I always used to eat it with no trouble. A couple of weeks later I tried it again. Same problem, so I wrote in big red letters in my food diary not to eat that brand of chummus again! Recently I decided to try a different brand to see if that was the issue - not quite as bad a reaction, but I really started to think about the chick peas being a problem, as it also seems to be the case with other beans for me. So am also glad to find that it's not all in my head. I am also curious, however, as to what makes it more of problem now than when I wasn't gluten-free. Your idea is an interesting one.