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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Susanna

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  1. Very Hard To Lose Fat

    Such a tough question--how can one lose weight? It's affected by so many things. You are doing lots that should help. Beyond that, here are my thoughts: 1. Now that you've been gluten-free for 18 mos, it's possible that your gut is finally healed (it can take 2 years, they say) and you're absorbing your nutrients through your gut adequately for the first time in your life. This is good, because you're finally absorbing the vitamins, etc. that you need. But it also means you're a set up for weight gain. 2. Work to reduce stress--Stress makes you secrete cortisol, which triggers your body to hold onto fat--especially belly fat. All the literature says do meditation daily--it's great for decreasing cortisol production. 3. Accept that it's going to be a battle for you--in middle age, our metabolisms slow down and it's harder to lose weight. 4. Cardio, cardio, cardio! This is where the fat is burned. Mix it up--try Crossfit, or spinning, or anything that is high intensity 5. Think about a time when you were losing weight successfully. What are you doing differently now? Were you keeping a food or calorie journal then and you've quit that? There may be something you changed that accounts for your current plateau. Go back to your methods when you were successful--they mayhelp you again. You sound very motivated--hang onto that! Good luck!
  2. Favorite Protein/power Bar?

    There's a great company called You Bar ( youbars.com ) in which you can order your own custom bars. This is AWESOME news for anyone with specific nutrition needs--you can choose type of protein, add fiber if you want, pick which fruits or sweeteners or, well, the possiblilities are endless! There's even an option to click on where they tell you if the bar you've chosen will be tasty or not. Very cool. You have to order a whole box, of course, and they're a little pricey (about $3/bar) but well worth it in my book. Another I really like is the Simply Bar, available on (can't say the name, but it rhymes with cramazon.com ). These are high protein, low cal, easy on the stomach and very durable (they don't melt in your backpack). They are very mild tasting--not thrilling, but not objectionable tasting either. But if I want a more delicious bar, I go for a Larabar or a Kind Bar.
  3. Amazon's prices on gluten-free products are fairly competitively priced.
  4. You just gotta accept that there will be a certain degree of risk for CC at the fair. But my son and I have had the kettle corn, roasted corn on the cob, candy apples/carmel apples, dish of ice cream, cotton candy, fudge, and lemonade at the fair and have had no problems.
  5. The shopping and figuring-out-what-you-can-eat in general gets a lot better after you adjust to this whole deal. Eating in restaurants, at friends' houses, parties/potlucks, it all gets easier with time. You'll see. Most ice creams are gluten-free--just use your head tho--avoid cookie and cream, birthday cake kinds, etc. I've never found a rocky road or a fudge ripple or a mint chip or vanilla carton with gluten in it. I'm pasting in my write up of gluten-free newbie tips--hope it helps. gluten-free newbie tips--now you can eat to treat, and soon feel better. Here are some key coping strategies to get you started. 1. Know that you will grieve your old favorite gluten-filled foods. I actually tear up when I see a brioche sometimes. Grieving is normal, BUT IT IS NOT EASY OR COMFORTABLE. People around you will eat treats you can't have and you will feel sad and isolated. Strategy: stock your car, office, purse, backpack, secret drawer at home with gluten-free treats you can reach for any time you are feeling deprived. This really helped me. I recommend Baby Ruth Bars, Snicker Bars, Lara Bars, Dove Dark Chocolate, meringue cookies, macaroon cookies (read labels), Butterfinger, Reeses Peanut Butter Cups. You get the idea. Also
  6. Horrible Experience At Chipotle

    I'm so sorry you had a bad experience. I've had wonderful service at multiple Chipotles in both Arizona and Colorado. In Breckenridge, I asked what do you have that is gluten free? The gal behind the counter got her manager, and he gave me a card that listed all their foods with common allergens (lots of soy)--all their marinades and dressings are gluten-free--the only thing you have to worry about is the flour tortillas--the gal changed her gloves and served me up a bowl with great stuff. I've never gotten sick there. Anyway, maybe you could give them another chance? It's good healthy food. Good luck, Susanna
  7. Vegan And Now Gluten Free! Help!

    Hey--I got diagnosed thru positive tests, but my brother's were negative. In frustration (and 20 years of getting up at night to have diarrhea) he finally decided to go gluten free. Within a few months, all the symptoms that no doctor could every explain went completely away! So, he had negative tests, but a positive family history (since I have it), all the symptoms, and the symptoms resolved on the gluten-free diet--so you tell me, does he have celiac disease, or doesn't he? Doesn't matter--he feels cured so he's never going back to gluten. And yes, it's possible to live gluten-free and vegan too. At my house, I'm celiac, and one of my daughters is vegan. Here are some vegan and gluten-free meals we eat: --eggs. (Just kidding) --tacos: corn tortillas, refried beans, salsa, avocado, lettuce, etc. You can even do the soy or almond vegan cheese if you want. (for us meat eaters, I also put out chicken and cheese) --spaghetti: gluten-free pasta, jar sauce, tofu whisked into the sauce, maybe add mushrooms or whatever. We do this with garlic bread too: gluten-free/vegan bread, vegan margarine, minced garlic, toasted under broiler. --build your own pizzas: gluten-free/vegan loaf of bread cut longways, jar marinara sauce, and put out the fixins for everyone to build their own: we put out peppers, vegan cheese, artichoke hearts, olives, sun dried tomatoes, etc. --succotash: corn, lima beans (or edamame), a pinch of red pepper flakes, sald and pepper, a pinch of dried thyme--this is great for brunch, dinner, whatever--the whole fam loved it. Restauants: we've had good luck with PF Changs, Pei Wei, (these are chains), Indian food, Mexican (beans and rice, corn tortillas, salsa), and one great gourmet pizza place in town: Picazzo's (we live in Flagstaff, AZ, and there are several other Picazzo's in Arizona). Their gluten-free crust is vegan and you just pick what toppings you want. Flagstaff even just got a new vegetarian restaurant called Hip Vegetarian--which has a gluten-free menu if you ask for it. Over all, yeah you'll have to adjust, but I bet it won't be as hard as you think: you already learned to adjust to vegan diet--I recommend you go to your favorite vegetarian restaurants and ask them what gluten-free dishes they can do for you--you'll be surprised at how much they know about it. Of course you can't do tempeh or seitan anymore, or most of the fake meats, but Boca does have some vegan burgers you can get in the regular grocery stores now. You can do this. Good luck, Susanna
  8. Dating A Celiac

    What a great partner you are to be doing this research! You're right that most beer has barley in it (or wheat), and is therefore off limits to celiacs. But, there are some gluten free beers on the market: Anheiser-Busch's Redbride is pretty good, and no more expensive than a regular 6-bottle pack of decent beer. You can get it at most grocery stores (at least I find it at Albertsons, Kroger, etc. in Flagstaff). Bard's Tale's Dragon Gold gluten-free beer is WAY good, but pretty pricey--I find it at Whole Foods. These are both sorghum based. I have NOT liked any rice-based beer I've tried so far (I forget the brands). As a home brewer, you might want to learn how to brew gluten-free beer yoursef: it'll be sorghum based. If you're into making beer, it'll probably be a fun process for you. Wine is gluten-free. So are distilled spirits. You're right to be concerned about glutening her by kissing her--that's happened to many celiacs. At my house, the whole household has migrated to pretty much a gluten-free diet (the nonceliacs can get their gluten fix elsewhere), and it's not as hard a transition as people think. It took us about 6 months to learn what was and wasn't OK in our kitchen, and since then, it's been pretty easy. good luck, Susanna
  9. Newly Diagnosed

    Yes you can manage both disorders--you will require an adjustment period while you learn about the gluten-free diet, but as you do, it gets better--so much easier to manage--it took me about 6 months to learn how to live gluten-free, and since then, it's really not that hard or inconvenient, and WELL worth how much better I feel since I got off gluten. Your pain should go away, but it may take a while--your gut is probably pretty inflamed. gluten-free newbie tips--now you can eat to treat, and soon feel better. Here are some key coping strategies to get you started. 1. Know that you will grieve your old favorite gluten-filled foods. I actually tear up when I see a brioche sometimes. Grieving is normal, BUT IT IS NOT EASY OR COMFORTABLE. People around you will eat treats you can't have and you will feel sad and isolated. Strategy: stock your car, office, purse, backpack, secret drawer at home with gluten-free treats you can reach for any time you are feeling deprived. This really helped me. I did it with candy bars (Baby Ruth Bars, Snicker Bars) but maybe you'll need to choose something a little more diabetic-friendly, like peanuts or something). Also
  10. My brother also needed a lot of convincing. He had 20 years of gut complaints, and missed out on a river trip in the Grand Canyon "because I would be too far from a bathroom" and got up in the middle of the night for years to have diarrhea--he was told he had IBS, and "a twitchy gut" and "psychological problems". Then, I got diagnosed at age 43, and my then 10 year old son right after. I immediately started working on my brother to get tested. He did get tested and the tests were negative, which I'm convinced was incorrectly done tests--I feel sure he is celiac (I mean, he has the family history, all the symptoms, and when he finally went gluten-free, his symptoms resolved). The hook that finally got him was when I said, "What would it take for you to just try a 3 month gluten free trial? Intestinal cancer? Because that's probably where you're headed." He's been gt for a year now, and all his symptoms have resolved. Another hook that might work for your brother: tell him chicks dig buff guys--maybe he'd gain weight if he were on the right (gluten-free, presuming he's celiac) diet. Don't make it a battle: show him how well you're doing gluten free, and how it has enhanced your health. Gently lead. good luck, Susanna
  11. Hey, Anna--welcome to the boards! My brother, too was excited to finally get a diagnosis of celiac, after 20 years of GI problems. I had symptoms "only" 4 years before my diagnosis, and my son, now 12 got diagnosed when he was 10. We are ALL SO MUCH HAPPIER AND HEALTHIER LIVING GLUTEN FREE! So, it is great to see you excited. Here are my newbie tips--hope they are helpful: gluten-free newbie tips--now you can eat to treat, and soon feel better. Here are some key coping strategies to get you started. 1. Know that you will grieve your old favorite gluten-filled foods. I actually tear up when I see a brioche sometimes (and you might get misty if someone eats a Ferrero Rocher in front of you!). Grieving is normal, BUT IT IS NOT EASY OR COMFORTABLE. People around you will eat treats you can't have and you will feel sad and isolated. Strategy: stock your car, office, purse, backpack, secret drawer at home with gluten-free treats you can reach for any time you are feeling deprived. This really helped me. I recommend Baby Ruth Bars, Snicker Bars, Lara Bars, Dove Dark Chocolate, meringue cookies, macaroon cookies (read labels), Butterfinger, Reeses Peanut Butter Cups. You get the idea. Also
  12. Sorry--that's a tough one. Your options will depend on what kind of church you attend. At my church, I explained the problem to my pastor, and he immediately ordered rice wafers for me--and these get blessed while the wheat bread gets blessed, and the wine is served in tiny individual cups, so there's no contamination there. So now at commuion, they tear off bread for most folks, and announce that gluten free host is available for the gluten intolerant folks--I just whisper "rice wafer" to him when he gets to me, to remind him. This has worked out well so far. I get the impression that most of the protestant denominations are OK doing the rice wafers, but you gotta talk to your pastor--he or she won't figure this out on his own for you. Catholics, on the other hand, have not (yet) accepted rice wafers as suitable for communion hosts, so if you're Catholic, read on: My pastor also told me that you can take just the wine, and skip the bread altogether, and this is still considered the complete sacrament--so if your church can't or won't order you the rice wafers, if you can ask for a few tiny individual containers of the wine to be available, and you could take these instead of drinking from the common cup, which will definitely not be safe for you if people are dipping their bread in it. When I'm traveling, I usually skip communion, unless they announce they have gluten-free host available. Another option would be for you to decide to go up and just ask for a blessing instead of taking communion. Whatever you decide, it's YOUR personal decision--The only option I hope you do NOT choose is to ever again take communion bread with gluten in it. I grew up Catholic, and I'm Lutheran now, so I get both the Catholic and Protestant perspectives of this--communion is supposed to be a gift from God--I don't think God would want us to take into our bodies something we KNOW will hurt us. No matter what, I definitely recommend you talk to your priest/pastor about your situation, and make a plan together. Helping out is what they're there for. good luck, Susanna
  13. Boy, that's a tough one. Here are my thoughts: 1. Use this as a hook: tell him he will grow once he stops inflaming his gut with gluten--when the gluten assault stops and your gut settles down, it will absorb the nutrients and YOU WILL GROW. There have been amazing incidences of celiac kids growing several inches after getting off gluten--tell him chicks dig grown up GUYS, not little boys. 2. One huge barrier to teens being compliant with the diet is they feel weird around their friends because they have to eat differently. So, make sure he has normal food to pack in his lunch. Just normal food that happens to be gluten-free: trail mix, fruit, string cheese, fruit, beef jerkey-but read labels of course. Teens love junk food LET HIM EAT IT--Cheetos, Fritos, tortilla chips are all gluten-free. So are Snicker Bars, Baby Ruth Bars, and many others. If he doesn't feel weird around his friends, he may be more compliant. Granted, these are not great nutrition, but he needs the calories anyway, and if it increases his compliance, I think it's worth it. You provide the great nutrition at home at dinner. I would say you should focus on anything he wants that is gluten-free for lunch, regardless of nutritional value--make this compromise just to get him through that lunch meal at school that is so high risk for cheating. 3. On the control issue. You can only control him so much. Yes, a clear message should be sent that your expectation is that he will follow the prescribed diet, because he respects his body and is a good steward of it--just as you expect him to wear a bike helmet and not do drugs. Set the good example by going gluten free at home. You provide the right diet for him. Yes I mean the whole family. At my house, for the first 2 years after my son and I got diagnosed, I just flat didn't bring gluten groceries into the house. I figured we had it tougher than the non-celiacs, and they could get their gluten fix out of the house, but at home all I provided was gluten-free. Interestingly, my husband (a non-celiac) now complains if we're out of the gluten-free bread and all there is is the gluten bread. He also prefers gluten-free pizza now. HOW CAN YOU EXPECT HIM TO COMPLY WHILE HIS FAMILY EATS GLUTEN GOODIES IN FRONT OF HIM? He's already showing you this is hard for him--don't make it any harder by having gluten in the house--besides--that temptation is a set up for failure. When your son is not home, guess what? You can't control him. If he's going to cheat, he's going to cheat. Let go of your illusion that you're in control of that. All you can do is talk to him, ask him to comply, explain why (how he will benefit from it). Just make sure you point out when he's feeling crappy--is it because maybe he didn't eat right? This spoke volumes to my son--my pointing out the stomach ache always came after he ate bread or pizza. Also, point it out when he does eat right and feels better. Make sure he knows what normal foods are OK. Help him make a master list of the gluten-free foods at all the fast food chains--at burger places, my son and I order fries, get a bun-less burger, or a milkshake--show him he can still go out w/ friends and feel normal, he just has to learn what's OK and what's not. Even at Subway he can get a drink and chips. This isn't important to celiac adults--the whole peer thing--but it's HUGE to kids, especially teens. Good luck to him and you--I hope he does well. Susanna
  14. In Place Of Eggs

    My daughter, the vegan uses mashed banana or apple sauce to replace eggs in some recipes, like brownies or quick breads. She uses mashed avocado or silken tofu in some savory dishes like lentil loaf. I like the idea of ground flax meal and water--it's sooOOOooo healthy! good luck, Susanna