Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

KatsMom

Members
  • Content count

    3
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About KatsMom

  • Rank
    New Community Member
  1. You may not have heard of Elimination Communication/Natural Infant Hygeine/Infant Potty Training, but practicing this gentle method of early toilet learning was one of the things that tipped me off to my 11-mo.-old's gluten sensitivity. Basically, when she consumes gluten she wets her pants a lot and sometimes looks completely surprised when it occurs (even when she doesn't signal me that she has to go, there is usually a change in her posture, facial expression, activity, etc. whne she does). I know now that a gluten exposure means we go from 1-3 wet pants a day (our current range) to 5-12. From mothers on an EC list, I have heard that the same often happens with other food sensitivities. Someone theorized that if it's throwing off the gut, it may also affect muscles in the pelvic floor. Make sense? Anyway, I recommend investigating diet for any child that has incontinence issues--it's worked for us, and given us other benefits I hadn't expected!
  2. I've been using potato starch 1:1 with good results. And almond meal for cornmeal, if you come up against that. =)
  3. I have a 10.5-month-old who has a gluten allergy/intolerance (diagnosed through elimination and challenge). She most definitely reacts to exposure through breastmilk, including tiny amounts (one mouthful of bread at communion). As a matter of fact, after the 10 days of runny nose, erratic bowels, rash, and irritability (aka screaming most of her waking hours) she last experienced when given gluten directly, it's the only way I'm willing to test it at present. And we'll wait quite a while. When I've spoken to the pediatrician about it, he said that most kids outgrow pediatric allergies and that he didn't think it was worth testing for at least another year. "Just avoid it," was his advice. I wanted to come ask what the likelihood is that with gluten allergy at this age that she will eventually be found to have celiac. If anyone knows, I'd love to hear.