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BensMom

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  1. I also checked with Rose Art who told me their products were gluten free except their dough as well, Good Luck!
  2. Thank you all for your support. I informed my sn's md about this site and explained that alot of the stories I read sounded very similar to my son. I have read some of the works of other mds mentioned below. He has been casien and wheat free for a year. The developmental delays and behavorial issues continued. He is now gluten free in every area of his life for the last two weeks. What I find most interesting is that at 5 yo he doesn't question it and appears to enjoy the foods he can eat. Since last year at this time he has gained 5 lbs. Not bad or a failure to thrieve. Thanks again for the support. I wish the medical world would catch up to see that not everyone fits the same marks.
  3. My 5 yo son went for his check up today. I had faxed the Enterolab results to him several days prior. He questioned the resulst which showed positive for both casein and gluten sensitivity. He also questioned the DQ 1 and 3 markers. He stated that since my son did not have the DQ 2 and 8 markers there was no way it could be Celiac. Of course his refulx as and infant then asthma, fine motor skill delay and now ADHD behavior is not enough proof. My 5 yo has had a a rough medical experience since 2 weeks of age. I explained that some research not only showed that the DQ1 marker was related to gluten sensitivity, but also neuro issues. Does anyone know what materials I can use to help his md reference to for help and support? Any comments would be greatly appreciated. I am getting so fustrated trying to get help for him with no support from any medical staff. I get the feeling everyone just wants to put him on meds for ADHD and leave it at that. It's hard for me to do when I am not convienced that is the fix. HELP!
  4. My son has the dark circles. When we treated him for his yeast issues, I noticed the circles disappeared. I also understand that if there is a yeast issue, most likely there is a mold sensitivity. This also held true for him. We just started the gluten free diet so I am hoping some of these issues will calm down or resolve as he clears his system.
  5. When we were told that my son need to be on a gluten free diet, he was taking an antifungal for yeast. The doctor wanted him to stay on it for a year, in order not to change too many things at once. He had donewith the antifungal and had finished two and half jars of the stuff. I noticed his circles under his eyes went away, and he was whinning less. We agree to stop the med last week because I didn't want to push the med for a year and, I didn't want to kill off what good bacteria was left in his system. The doc agreed. Sure enough one week later his circles are back and he is more likely to become fustrated easier and cry. Of course, his DQ1 gene can be contributing to the issue as he detoxs off the gluten. Does anyone know of anything natural that may help. Anyone with experience with yeast issues that can offer any advice?
  6. Thanks. I found it.
  7. I tried to post on Sat. The post never showed up on the board. I tried to post the same message and it still did not shw up. Please help.
  8. I am new, and I post a message but it not has shown up yet. It has been a couple of hours. Please let me know what I need to do correctly.
  9. Hi, I hope someone will help me figure some things out. I am a mom of a 5 yo son. This guy has had a rough start. At 6 weeks he started with reflux, then croup, at 2 yo we had full blown out of control asthma, 2 1/2 yo we gained the failure to thrieve dx, and now last year med staff tried to say he had senory processing disorder and ADHD. Now we have discovered fine motor delays and some processing issues. My mom "gut feeling" felt like mds were missing the boat with this kid. I began researching and found out the he had a dairy and wheat sensitivity by getting some allergy test done. I recently had him tested with Enterolab, and this was his results: A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value Fecal Antigliadin IgA 30 (Normal Range <10 Units) Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 20 Units (Normal Range <10 Units) Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score <300 Units (Normal Range <300 Units) Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 23 Units (Normal Range <10 Units) HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0301 HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0602 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,1 (Subtype 7,6) Interpretation of Fecal Antigliadin IgA: Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well. Interpretation of Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA: You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity. Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal. Interpretation of Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test. Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: Although you do not possess the main genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (DQ1 or DQ3 not subtype 8). Having two copies of a gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity may be more severe. For more information about result interpretation, please see http://www.enterolab.com/StaticPages/Faq_R...erpretation.htm Stool Analysis performed by: Frederick Ogunji, Ph.D., EnteroLab Molecular Gene Analysis performed by: American Red Cross Interpretation of all results by: Kenneth D. Fine, M.D., EnteroLab Thank You For Allowing EnteroLab to Help You Attain Optimum Intestinal And Overall Health. Any support or knowledge would be greatly appreciated. I wrote a different support group online and the response was he is not celiac disease/gluten sensitive and there was question re: the lab. I was also told good luck getting anything change in his school environments with out an offical dx. I have done research and talked with the lab staff, and they have answered a lot of questions. It does appear my son seems to have some of the neuro side affects, which would go with his marker. From what I can tell the range for gluten sensitivity and Celiac can vary so much. He is such a sweet kid and is very willing to comply with the diet. I have seen improvement and his eating has picked up even more since we have become stricter on gluten. Any suggestions on information or research articles that I can bring to his peds doc would also be greatly appreciated.
  10. My son is a double DQ1, and he was in the low 300 range. He has been dairy and wheat free for over a year and now we are pulling out gluten.
  11. Hi, I hope someone will help me figure some things out. I am a mom of a 5 yo son. This guy has had a rough start. At 6 weeks he started with reflux, then croup, at 2 yo we had full blown out of control asthma, 2 1/2 yo we gained the failure to thrieve dx, and now last year med staff tried to say he had senory processing disorder and ADHD. Now we have discovered fine motor delays and some processing issues. My mom "gut feeling" felt like mds were missing the boat with this kid. I began researching and found out the he had a dairy and wheat sensitivity by getting some allergy test done. I recently had him tested with Enterolab, and this was his results: A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value Fecal Antigliadin IgA 30 (Normal Range <10 Units) Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 20 Units (Normal Range <10 Units) Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score <300 Units (Normal Range <300 Units) Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 23 Units (Normal Range <10 Units) HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0301 HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0602 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,1 (Subtype 7,6) Interpretation of Fecal Antigliadin IgA: Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well. Interpretation of Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA: You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity. Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal. Interpretation of Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test. Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: Although you do not possess the main genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (DQ1 or DQ3 not subtype 8). Having two copies of a gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity may be more severe. For more information about result interpretation, please see http://www.enterolab.com/StaticPages/Faq_R...erpretation.htm Stool Analysis performed by: Frederick Ogunji, Ph.D., EnteroLab Molecular Gene Analysis performed by: American Red Cross Interpretation of all results by: Kenneth D. Fine, M.D., EnteroLab Thank You For Allowing EnteroLab to Help You Attain Optimum Intestinal And Overall Health. Any support or knowledge would be greatly appreciated. I wrote a different support group online and the response was he is not celiac disease/gluten sensitive and there was question re: the lab. I was also told good luck getting anything change in his school environments with out an offical dx. I have done research and talked with the lab staff, and they have answered a lot of questions. It does appear my son seems to have some of the neuro side affects, which would go with his marker. From what I can tell the range for gluten sensitivity and Celiac can vary so much. He is such a sweet kid and is very willing to comply with the diet. I have seen improvement and his eating has picked up even more since we have become stricter on gluten. Any suggestions on information or research articles that I can bring to his peds doc would also be greatly appreciated.