Get email alerts Get E-mail Alerts Sponsor: Sponsor:

Ads by Google:

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE email alerts

  • Announcements

    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


Advanced Members
  • Content count

  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About MNBeth

  • Rank
    Advanced Community Member

Profile Information

  • Gender Female
  • Location Minneapolis, MN
  1. I was intimidated out of having the endoscopy by a couple of GI docs, but I wish I'd pushed back and gotten it done before I went off gluten. (I didn't have a positive blood test, though, so the situation was a bit different. My father, however, and a cousin or two are clinically diagnosed celiacs.) Anyway, I do find it inconvenient at times not to have the firm diagnosis. It's not the end of the world, but there are times when it would simplify things if I could just say I have celiac disease. But you're soooo right not to have it done by *that* guy. Yikes.
  2. Panic Attacks & Gluten

    My teenage son was having panic attacks pretty regularly for a while. They have gone away since going gluten-free, but it took some time. I'm thinking a few months before they stopped altogether. But he hasn't had one for a long time, now. He's only been gluten-free for about 20 months, and I'm pretty vigilant, so he hasn't had a serious " glutening" for a long time. I'm not sure whether he would have one again if he got seriously glutened.
  3. Hi Angie, I'm so sorry to hear about the awful week you're having. It does get hard to take, doesn't it? After totally crashing after Easter, I've been digging around for more answers, and suspect that reactive hypoglycemia is something I'm also dealing with. It's maddening how little consensus of opinion there is about how to manage it! After reading "Hypoglycemia: The Classic Healthcare Handbook" by Saunders & Ross, I'm off all sugar (inc. honey), refined carbohydrates, dried fruits and even root vegetables and the sweeter fruits. I'm still eating grains, but only whole, and in small quantities. I don't know what to think about legumes - opinions are totally polar on those. I haven't been glutened lately, but it's that time of month for me, so I'm craving carbs and sugar like crazy. And creamy - anything creamy - but I'm having trouble with dairy, too. What I wouldn't give for a bowl of cereal! Sometimes it's just hard to feel satisfied on meat and veggies and a little fruit. Since going off all that, I've been extremely weak and tired. This is what the authors predicted, but it stinks just the same. Folding the laundry feels like a workout. It's so frustrating that when we feel the worst, we need, where food is concerned, to do the most for ourselves - no prepared foods, no "out" food... Whine, whine! Sorry; this is YOUR whine! Mainly just wanted to say that I feel your pain. Hang in there!
  4. Absolutely it could be this. I'm not saying it is, but it's definitely something that needs to be looked into. I think I'll leave it to others to recommend a course of action, though. I'm sure some good advice will be along presently...
  5. Grinding Your Own

    I had a similar experience w/birdseed, only it was in our front hall closet. That was also where I kept my buckets of wheat for milling, and I thought that's where they were coming from. It took me an embarrassingly long time to figure out that it was that dumb bag of birdseed - for the feeder someone gave us that we never did get around to putting up! I'm glad it wasn't in my kitchen. I did have them get into 2-3 things in there, but that was all. Miraculously, my big buckets of wheat sealed tightly enough to keep them out of that! Gives me the willies just to think about the whole experience!
  6. Please don't eat the Ezekiel Bread. It may be fine for people who simply have trouble digesting gluten, but celiac disease is not an inability to digest but an autoimmune response to gluten. I've never seen any research that would suggest that the sprouting process renders the gluten unrecognizable to a celiac's immune system.
  7. I used to freak out about wheat grass, too, being too fearful of possible wheat grains in anything with wheat grass to try it - until I actually saw some barley grass. If you to do a Google Image search for "wheat grass," you may see what I mean. Wheat grass, when ready for harvest, looks like your lawn. It is far, far too young to have any heads of grain yet developing. There may be people who react, but I doubt that it would be from wayward grains of wheat. I don't blame anyone for avoiding it, but neither would I think anyone crazy for trying it, especially as there do seem to be people who do fine with it.
  8. No, unfortunately this recipe won't work with gluten-free flour. There are many recipes that can be easily adapted with a substitution of gluten-free flour for regular flour, but yeast breads are a decided exception to the rule; they rely too heavily on the gluten to give them their unique structure and texture. There is no gluten substitute that is adequate to make a regular bread recipe work w/gluten free flour. With gluten-free breads you need some binders to try to compensate for the missing gluten, but even with those additives, the nature of the dough is so completely different as to require very different handling. If you tried to knead gluten-free bread dough, you'd have quite a mess on your hands - literally! For gluten-free bread you really need to start with a gluten-free bread recipe. You have a tough combination of limitations to work with, though. I think you could use a combination of millet flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch. I would think one part each would work, though i have never tried that particular combination. If the recipe you use does not include xanthan gum, make sure include some with your flour - I would estimate about 1/2 teaspoon per cup of flour. Any other opinions on those ratios?
  9. When I made my buns in the pot pie tins, I was able to level out the dough simply by picking up the tins and dropping them on the counter a few times after I'd scooped the dough in. (BEFORE letting them rise, of course!) Simple, neat, and the best looking buns I've made yet! I'm not sure how well it would work with a sheet full of rings, but I'm going to try it if I ever get the rings. Maybe I'll put another sheet on top while I smack it on the counter to keep the rings from bouncing around...
  10. Amazon has them, too, a little cheaper, and w/free shipping if you spend at least $25. They're on my wish list!
  11. I would try reducing the liquid a bit and see if that helps.
  12. I just made a great batch with foil pot pie tins I picked up at the grocery store. I may still get some hamburger rings, as the flare of the pie tins limits the # that will fit on a sheet pan, but in the meantime the cheapo tins worked great.
  13. These look yummy - I'll have to give them a try! (Your gluten-free flour blend looks a lot like mine - I love sorghum flour)
  14. I am so sorry for what you've suffered for all those years. My own son, now 17, went through some similar things, though not for as many years. But he definitely had the very scary panic attacks and mysterious stomach and more generalized pain. He was sick for almost two years, and while he did manage to keep going with school, it was a very difficult time for all of us. We also have celiac in the family, and when my son's blood tests were negative, we weren't convinced. We ended up ordering our own tests through Enterolab, and between those results and positive dietary response, it became very evident that he needed to be off gluten. Will you mind if I encourage you to try not to focus your attention on the years you've "lost?" It is true that your teenage experience has not been typical, but in many ways we learn and grow more through difficulties than through ease and comfort. I suspect that in many ways you will be more ready, not less, for the challenges of adulthood than will those who have not been forced to learn to persevere through hardship. When you think of all you've suffered, try to think - "and I MADE IT THROUGH!" Then try to look forward to all that you will now be able to do with your life. Celebrate, if you can, your release from the chains of your illness. I know it is not always easy, and do not mean to imply that it is. But I hate to see you miss out on the happiness that is more available to you now by dwelling on a past you cannot change. Set your face forward and hope!
  15. Grinding Your Own

    Just curious - was it cost that led you to pursue these two items rather than a grain mill?