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oldsalt19

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About oldsalt19

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  1. There seems to be a problem with the forum software. In an earlier post, I wrote:"the celiac disease version of a prominent medical textbook..." but the software insists on displaying it as "the celiac disease version of a prominent medical textbook..." I've tried to edit this several times with no success. Also, I kept loosing whole lines when I would just change a word or two. HA! it did it again! Every time I type these two letters which describe a common object that stores digital information (the third and fourth letter in the alphabet) in caps, the software changes it to "celiac disease."
  2. There seems to be a problem with the forum software. In the above post, I wrote:"the celiac disease version of a prominent medical textbook..." but the software insists on displaying it as "the celiac disease version of a prominent medical textbook..." I've tried to edit this several times with no success. Also, I kept loosing whole lines when I would just change a word or two. HA! it did it again! Every time I type these two letters which describe a common object that stores digital information (the third and fourth letter in the alphabet) in caps, the software changes it to "celiac disease."
  3. I'm not sure that this topic belongs in this part of the forum, but here goes anyway. In my 37 years as a Medical Laboratory Specialist and Lab Director, I have seen your kind of story all too often. Go see Michael Moore's movie Sicko. I can tell you from experience that this movie accurately describes the situation in the US. I'm not sure if you are in the US or not. All people have bilirubin. It is a normal body product. However, it should be present in normal amounts. Too much and it may indicate real trouble, usually, but not always, the liver. I know nothing about MetaMatrix labs but I did check their website. It seems that much of their work is on "non-regulated analytes" (a government term) Most of the more common lab tests are on "regulated analytes", which means the the lab doing the tests must be inspected and then regularly tested themselves to insure that they do accurate work. If most of the analytes are non-regulated, then that also means less regulation of the lab. Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is quite rare. The first thing I'd do get a second opinion, which you did, evidently at considerable expense to yourself. People do not realize how poor the level of expertise is among those who call themselves doctors, even those who have received real medical degrees. A great number of diagnoses are just plain wrong. In my early days as a lab tech, one of my co-workers was earning his way through law school by working in our clinic. One of the clinic doctors was so bad that this law student said that he was going to follow this practitioner wherever he went so as to be supplied with a steady supply of malpractice legal work. I remember one medical provider who called the lab and wanted to know the results of the latest anemia tests on her patient. "She's been taking all her iron pills and she is still anemic," she complained. I could immediately see from the results that the type of anemia (Macrocytic) was not the type caused by iron deficiency. There was entirely a different kind of medicine the patient should have been taking. As diplomatically as I could, I explained the difference and how she could interpret the results to make the correct diagnosis. Interpeting lab results is an important part of the job of every medical provider. but many do not have even these basic skills. It got so bad in my workplace that the lab bought the celiac disease version of a prominent medical textbook so that we could print off the appropriate information needed to interpret the lab results. We would then include the printout with the lab results. Like many older men, I have my list of medical conditions. Most of these I have diagnosed myself and then had confirmed by the appropriate physicians. My celiac disease had previously been diagnosed as an ulcer and then as Irritable Bowel Disease (IBS) by supposedly fully qualified medical doctors. I have spent my life in medicine albeit in a laboratory setting. I have the specialized knowledge which enables me to help myself. I have often wondered how average folks possibly get decent medical care. If I were they, I'd be madder than hell.
  4. Hi Luke. While I'm not familiar with the Biocard, 37 years in a medical laboratory, may qualify me to provide some information. It doesn't seem likely that a fairly full tube of blood would "use up" all the antibodies. Most "quick tests" of any sort that are any good have OBC, which is an acronym for "On Board Controls." This means that there will be two results, both on the same stick every time you do a test. One result will be positive or negative for the antibody. The other will be a "control" to verify that the test worked properly, no matter what the test results (negative or positive) for the antibody. Sometimes its a dot, or some sort of line or whatever the manufacturers designed. If this line or dot or whatever does not appear correctly according to the instructions, then the test result, whatever it is, is not reliable. Here in the US, I have been told the the government Food & Drug Administration (FDA) will not approve any "quick" test that does not have this feature. Also, the advert that you linked to states: The Biocard Celiac Test is as accurate as tests performed in pathology laboratories In my opinion, this may not be so. Here in the US, any medical analytical lab is inspected yearly by the state, and in addition, is sent unknown "proficiency testing" samples, usually 3 times per year, which the lab analyzes and reports the results back to the proficiency testing agencies. If the tested labs are not within a certain required range, then an inspector shows up at the lab without previous notice to find out what's wrong. There are certain "waived" tests that are not subject to as many rules, but the lab is still required to verify accuracy of these "waived" tests twice per year. I am told that similar regulations are in place throughout the world where medical care is up to snuff. Home tests, if properly manufactured and designed, are a boon to medical self-care, but they are usually not equal in quality to professional laboratory procedures because of these strict regulations. Hope this helps.
  5. I went gluten free just yesterday and I'm already feeling better. As my (probable) gluten intolerance has become worse over the years, so have my headaches. Some were helped by migraine meds and some were not. We'll see.