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YoAdrianne66

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  1. More Info On Benadryl

    I found out some more info on Benadryl and just wanted to post it for everyone who is interested. ******************************************************************************** Benadryl Diphenhydramine HCl Benadryl - Benadryl Side Effects - Benadryl Information Indications: Antihistamine, antiemetic and antispasmodic. Allergic diseases such as hay fever, allergic rhinitis, urticaria, angioedema, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, gastrointestinal allergy, pruritus, physical allergies, reactions to injection of contrast media, reactions to therapeutic preparations and allergic transfusion reactions; also postoperative nausea and vomiting, motion sickness, and quieting emotionally disturbed children. Supplied: Caplets: Each, pink, film-coated caplet, imprinted Benadryl on both sides contains: diphenhydramine HCl 25 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: celluloses, dicalcium phosphate, D&C Red No. 27, PEG, polysorbate, starch, stearic acid, titanium dioxide, wax and zinc stearate. Energy: 0.5 kJ (0.12 kcal). Gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Unit packages of 12 and 24. Bottles of 50 and 100. Capsules: Each white capsule with pink cap contains: diphenhydramine HCl 50 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose, talc; capsule shell: FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Red No. 3, gelatin, silicon dioxide, sodium lauryl sulfate and titanium dioxide. Energy: 2 kJ (0.47 kcal). Gluten-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Bottles of 100. Extra Strength Nightime Caplets: Each white film-coated caplet, embossed B on one side and 50 on the other side contains: diphenhydramine HCl 50 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: calcium phosphate, cellulose, crospovidone, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycol, starch, stearic acid, titanium dioxide and wax. Gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Unit packages of 12. Child resistant package. Cream: Each g of white emulsion for topical use contains: diphenhydramine 2% w/w. Nonmedicinal ingredients: cetyl alcohol, paraben, PEG, propylene glycol and water. Tubes of 30 g. Elixir: Each 5 mL of red elixir contains: diphenhydramine HCl 12.5 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: alcohol, FD&C Red No. 2, flavoring agents, sugar and water. Energy: 42.7 kJ (10.2 kcal)/5 mL. Gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Plastic bottles of 100 mL. Children's Liquid: Each 5 mL of colorless, bubble-gum flavored liquid contains: diphenhydramine HCl 6.25 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: artificial bubble gum flavor, carboxymethylcellulose, citric acid, glycerin, saccharin, sodium benzoate, sodium citrate, sorbitol, vanilla flavor and water. Energy: 43.68 kJ (10.4 kcal)/5 mL. Alcohol-, dye-, gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Plastic bottles of 100 mL. Junior Strength Chewable Tablets: Each light purple, mottled, grape-flavored, scored, round tablet, imprinted Benadryl 12.5 on one side contains: diphenhydramine HCl 12.5 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: aspartame, corn syrup solids, D&C Red No. 27, FD&C Blue No. 1, flavor, magnesium stearate, magnesium trisilicate, monoammonium glycyrrhizinate and tartaric acid. Energy: 9.83 kJ (2.34 kcal). Alcohol-, gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sucrose-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Unit packages of 12.
  2. Benadryl

    One thing I noticed during one of my many stays in the hospital was that when I was given IV benadryl along with my other meds, is that it seemed to help reduce my symptoms even more than without it. So I googled and googled but couldn't find any info. I then went to Benadryl's FAQ web page it states that the OTHER uses for it is as an antispasmatic as well as for a sleep aid, and nausia. Also it stated that even though it doesn't contain gluten there is a chance for cross contamination (pill & liquid forms only -- IV/IM INJ 100% Gluten-free). Because of that chance, I can't take Benadryl in pill form. I also found out you can get a prescription for it in a pre-made injection pen of 50mg that comes in a package of ten (I guess kinda like an epi pen) and also it's available in vials and buy seringes separetly. Since last December 2008, my doctor prescribed to me the 50mg/Vials of Benadryl that I use with a 1ml seringe. I've noticed a big difference in how my symptoms have subsided even more since I started. On average I take it twice a day. One thing I need to talk over with my doctor is possibly getting a picc line because the one bad thing with Benadryl is that it can be hard on your skin tissue, even necrosis can occur if you don't use the proper precautions for infection or just not injectioning it properly into the muscle, etc..etc.. I'll try an keep updating how it goes. [b]***[/b]I also just wanted to quickly add that I do not advocate Benadryl as a cure for everyone who has Celiac Disease but just to present this information for those interested in looking into it further. This isn't a cure but just something that might help your symptoms. Talking it over with your GI doctor will help decide if this is the right course of treatment for you. Everyone is different and one thing that helps one person might not help another.
  3. Remember that some medication contains gluten or can be cross contaminated with gluten even though it might not contain it. You can check with the medication's manufacturer, they'll be able to tell you. Another thing is if you live with other people who eat gluten products you could get cross contamination that way like using the same utensils, pots & pans, etc.. If you want you can also try reading my other posts, I have been going through the same thing as you, still having lots of problems even though on a gluten free diet. There might be something that could help you. Hope you feel better soon!
  4. I just wanted to quickly add that I do not advocate Benadryl as a cure for everyone who has Celiac Disease but just to present this information for those interested in looking into it further. This isn't a cure but just something that might help your symptoms. Talking it over with your GI doctor will help decide if this is the right course of treatment for you. Everyone is different and one thing that helps one person might not help another.
  5. I found out some more info on Benadryl and just wanted to post it for everyone who is interested. One web page you can go to is Benadryl FAQ web page --- <<CLICK HERE>> that might be able to help you with the various questions you have or another one I found is Benadryl Manufactured by Pfizer Canada --- <<CLICK HERE>>. I just saw my GI doctor yesterday and he told me that I might have something else also with the Celiac Disease that just happens to react to treatment from Benadryl - so it makes sense why in my case it has been helping me. But only when I have received it in my IV when hospitalized because it's 100% gluten free in shot form only. So now I will be giving myself shots of Benadryl at home when needed because my GI doctor said it would greatly benefit me. He said it's common for some people who were diagnosed with Celiac Disease to also be diagnosed with this other thing too (sorry I can't remember what the name of it is but will post it later). I copied and pasted some of the information from the second web page below. Benadryl Diphenhydramine HCl Benadryl - Benadryl Side Effects - Benadryl Information Indications: Antihistamine, antiemetic and antispasmodic. Allergic diseases such as hay fever, allergic rhinitis, urticaria, angioedema, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, gastrointestinal allergy, pruritus, physical allergies, reactions to injection of contrast media, reactions to therapeutic preparations and allergic transfusion reactions; also postoperative nausea and vomiting, motion sickness, and quieting emotionally disturbed children. Supplied: Caplets: Each, pink, film-coated caplet, imprinted Benadryl on both sides contains: diphenhydramine HCl 25 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: celluloses, dicalcium phosphate, D&C Red No. 27, PEG, polysorbate, starch, stearic acid, titanium dioxide, wax and zinc stearate. Energy: 0.5 kJ (0.12 kcal). Gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Unit packages of 12 and 24. Bottles of 50 and 100. Capsules: Each white capsule with pink cap contains: diphenhydramine HCl 50 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose, talc; capsule shell: FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Red No. 3, gelatin, silicon dioxide, sodium lauryl sulfate and titanium dioxide. Energy: 2 kJ (0.47 kcal). Gluten-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Bottles of 100. Extra Strength Nightime Caplets: Each white film-coated caplet, embossed B on one side and 50 on the other side contains: diphenhydramine HCl 50 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: calcium phosphate, cellulose, crospovidone, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycol, starch, stearic acid, titanium dioxide and wax. Gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Unit packages of 12. Child resistant package. Cream: Each g of white emulsion for topical use contains: diphenhydramine 2% w/w. Nonmedicinal ingredients: cetyl alcohol, paraben, PEG, propylene glycol and water. Tubes of 30 g. Elixir: Each 5 mL of red elixir contains: diphenhydramine HCl 12.5 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: alcohol, FD&C Red No. 2, flavoring agents, sugar and water. Energy: 42.7 kJ (10.2 kcal)/5 mL. Gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Plastic bottles of 100 mL. Children's Liquid: Each 5 mL of colorless, bubble-gum flavored liquid contains: diphenhydramine HCl 6.25 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: artificial bubble gum flavor, carboxymethylcellulose, citric acid, glycerin, saccharin, sodium benzoate, sodium citrate, sorbitol, vanilla flavor and water. Energy: 43.68 kJ (10.4 kcal)/5 mL. Alcohol-, dye-, gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Plastic bottles of 100 mL. Junior Strength Chewable Tablets: Each light purple, mottled, grape-flavored, scored, round tablet, imprinted Benadryl 12.5 on one side contains: diphenhydramine HCl 12.5 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: aspartame, corn syrup solids, D&C Red No. 27, FD&C Blue No. 1, flavor, magnesium stearate, magnesium trisilicate, monoammonium glycyrrhizinate and tartaric acid. Energy: 9.83 kJ (2.34 kcal). Alcohol-, gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sucrose-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Unit packages of 12.
  6. I was diagnosed in 2003 with Celiac Disease when I was 38 years old. I have from what the doctors say a severe case of Celiac Disease and I'm severely sensitive to gluten. From what they can see through the many tests done over the years, my small intestines have been severely damaged. I have been on a gluten free diet for 4 1/2 years now. Checking all products I use that may have gluten in it such as toothpaste, mouth wash, ect.. Also checking on all of my medications I take with the manufactures to make sure they are gluten free too AND if there is any possibility of cross contamination with the other gluten containing products that they make in their plant. I found out that gluten can be used in many forms of medication (tablets, capsules, and elixors) and the only kind that doesn't have any gluten or chance of cross contamination are injectable medications. I have been working with a pain specialist and a GI doctor who (luckily) know what I am going through and specialize in this field. I've been seeing them for a few months now and they have had me try different medications to see which works better. Last time I was in the hospital the previous doctors were seriously thinking of putting me on IV meds for at home since they worked everytime I've been in the hospital (and for the fact that they are 100% gluten free). But I didn't want to have a central line or pic line put in, let alone be constantly on IV meds. So my new doctors understand how I feel and we've been pretty much going through a "trial and error" period on the different medications and hopefully find something that will help me. In the hospital although, Benadryl Inj. / 50mg has been one medication I have noticed that always has really helped me with my severe case of celiac. I noticed that when taking it at the same time with my other medications, I seemed to get relief faster and better, rather than not using it at all. Benadryl doesn't work by itself only with your other meds. So I did some research and found out on Benadryl's FAQ web page it states that the OTHER uses for it is as an antispasmatic as well as for a sleep aid, and nausia. Also it stated that even though it doesn't contain gluten there is a chance for cross contamination. Because of that chance, I can't take Benadryl in pill form. I also found out you can get a prescription for it in a pre-made injection pen of 50mg that comes in a package of ten (I guess kinda like an epi pen) and also it's available in vials (like insulin for a diabetic). This to me doesn't sound too bad if given with the right combination of my other medications (with them being appsolutely 100% gluten free pill form). So next time, I see my doctors this is our next thing we'll be trying. Hopefully this will work. It's seems better to take a shot of Benadryl now and then with a severe flare up than having to take all my medications by injections in a central/pic line. I even have to worry about cross contamination at home with using house hold items such as utensils, plates/cups, pots and pans, etc.. So I have my own that I only use as well as my own pre-made gluten free groceries and even the common items such as butter, peanut butter, etc.. But this is because of how severe my case of Celiac is. Yes, I know, it's been a "pain" staking ordeal in many ways! But if any of this leads to some type of relief and regain my life back (not to mention not having to go to the hospital anymore!) I think I'll try it. I hope this has helped you in some way. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
  7. I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in June/2003 and my weight at the time was around 330 pounds. I had gained all this weight after having two back surgeries in August/2001, that left me initially paralized on my left side from the waist down because of a disk fragment that was pushed into my spine unfortunatly. Before my surgeries I weighed about 200 pounds but during my recovery I had started to gradually gain all that weight through the next couple of years. I have now lost 118 pounds since I have been on the gluten free diet. I've been gluten free for 4 1/2 years now and I have to say this is the only diet I ever had any luck on! LOL! The best thing I did was to start seeing a nutritionist that specialized in Celiac Disease and gluten free diets. She was able to answers all my dietary questions and get me on the right track. You should be able to have one referred to you by your physician or from the physician's referral at your local hospital. Good luck!
  8. First off....CONGRATS to you on being gluten free for 4 1/2 years! It's been about the same amount of time for me too. I was diagnosed in June/2003 with Celiac Disease when I was 38 years old. I had a painful flare up that sent me to the ER and they admitted me and ran many tests and procedures. I did go ahead with the endoscopy and biopsy which proved the diagnoses 100%. This flare up was my second one I had in a year. The first time I had a painful flare up, July/2002, I went to the ER but the ER doctor was ignorant and really wasn't interested in finding out what was wrong with me and brushed it off to being just a bladder infection. Since my diagnoses, I have gotten worse and the doctors say I am ultra or severely sensitive to gluten from what they can see off the numerous tests done over the years. The damage in my small intestines have just been progressively getting worse. I have chronic abdomenal pain, diahreah, nausea, and vomiting, that can go from tolerable to severe at any time. In the beginning, I only had flare ups once to maybe three times in a year. I've noticed within the last 2 years it has progressed up to now having them once to three times in a month with the flare ups maybe lasting a day or up to over a week when severe. This is also with being on a gluten free diet, checking all products I use that could have gluten in it such as toothpaste, mouth wash, etc., and even checking all medications I take with the manufactures to make sure they are gluten free AND if there is any possibility of their gluten free medications to have been cross contaminated with any other gluten containing products that they might make in their plant. I found out that gluten is used in many forms of medication and the only kind that doesn't have any gluten or chance of cross contamination are by injections. Thankfully I have been working with a pain specialist and a GI doctor who (luckily) know what I am going through and specialize in this field. I've been seeing them for a few months so far and they have had me try a various of different medications to see which works better. Last time I was in the hospital the previous doctors were seriously thinking of putting me on IV meds for at home since they worked everytime I've been in the hospital ( and that they are 100% gluten free ). But I didn't want to have a central line or pic line put in. So my new doctors understand and we've been going through "trial and error" on the different medications to find something that will help me. In the hospital although, one medication I've noticed that always helped with my severe case of celiac has been Benadryl Inj. / 50mg. I noticed that when I used it at the same time with my other medications, I felt relief faster and better compared to not taking the Benadryl Inj. with my medications. Benadryl doesn't work by itself to relieve the discomfort only with my other medications. So I did some research and found out on Benadryl's FAQ web page it does state that OTHER uses for it is also as an antispasmatic as well as for a sleep aid, and nausia. It also went on saying it doesn't contain gluten but there is a chance for cross contamination. And since I can't take Benadryl in the form of tablets, capsules, or elixor ..... I found out you can get a prescription for it in a pre made injection pen of 50mg that comes in a package of ten ( I guess kinda like an epi pen ) and also it's available in vials ( like insulin for a diabetic). This to me doesn't sound too bad if given with the right combination of my other medications (with them being in gluten free pill form). So next time, I see my doctors this is our next thing we'll be trying. Hopefully this will work. It's seems better to take a shot of Benadryl now and then with a severe flare up ........ than having to take all my medications by injections in a central/pic line. I don't think you're being unrealistic at all because I know that once someone is able to maintain and manage a gluten free regimen you will feel healed. Keeping it under control is the key to feeling better and getting back to a normal healthier life. I've read about this so many times and hearing how so many people have been able to do this regardless of how severe someone has the disease. I wish you all the best and good luck on your future test! I hope I'll be able to find a way to get mine under control soon so I can regain my life back as well. I hope this has helped you in some way. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
  9. I was diagnosed in 2003 with Celiac Disease when I was 38 years old. I had a painful flare up that sent me to the ER and they admitted me and ran many tests and procedures. I did go ahead with the endoscopy and biopsy which proved the diagnoses 100%. Even though (as with many procedures) there are risks involved I decided to go ahead with the procedure because the GI doctor who performed it had a great deal of experience in this procedure and knowledge. This flare up was my second one I had in a year and which lead to the diagnoses. The first time I had the flare up I went to the ER but the ER doctor was ignorant and really wasn't interested in finding out what was wrong with me and brushed it off to being a bladder infection. Two years ago I even had an ER doctor tell me that Celiac Disease is an allergy to CORN NOT WHEAT! I couldn't believe how ignorant and rude she was with me. And by this time I already had done the endless hours of research on the disease since being diagnosed with Celiac. So I understand conciderably what you mean about how some doctors can be so ignorant to this. I would think the best thing to do is research doctors in your area who specialize in Celiac Disease. It makes a world of difference when you can talk to a doctor who knows what you're going through. In my case though, since my diagnoses, I have gotten worse and they say I am ultra sensitive to gluten and from what they can see from the many tests done over the years my small intestines have been severely damaged. I have chronic abdomenal pain (along with all the other symptoms) that can go from tolerable to severe at any time. In the beginning I only had flare ups once to maybe three times in a year but now I can have them once to three times a month with them lasting a day or up to over a week. This is also with being on a gluten free diet, checking all products I use that could have gluten in it such as toothpaste, mouth wash, ect., and even checking all medications I take with the manufactures to make sure they are gluten free AND if there is any possibility of their gluten free medications to have been cross contaminated with any other gluten containing products that they might make in their plant. I found out that gluten is used in many forms of medication and the only kind that doesn't have any gluten or chance of cross contamination are by injections. I have been working with a pain specialist and a GI doctor who (luckily) know what I am going through and specialize in this field. I've been seeing them for a few months so far and they have had me try a various of different medications to see which works better. Last time I was in the hospital the previous doctors were seriously thinking of putting me on IV meds for at home since they worked everytime I've been in the hospital ( and that they are 100% gluten free ). But I didn't want to have a central line or pic line put in let alone be constantly on IV meds. So my new doctors understand how I feel and we've been pretty much going through "trial and error" on the different medications and hopefully find something that will help me. But if we don't find anything I dread what might be the inevitable. In the hospital although, one medication I have noticed that always has really helped me with my severe case of celiac has been Benadryl Inj. / 50mg. I noticed that when I got it along with my other medications at the same time, all of the medications seemed to help more rather than not receiving Benadryl Inj. with my medications. So I did some research and found out on Benadryl's FAQ web page it states that OTHER uses for it is a antispasmatic as well as for a sleep aid, and nausia. Also it stated that even though it doesn't contain gluten there is a chance for cross contamination. And since I can't take Benadryl in pill form .....I also found out you can get a prescription for it in a pre made injection pen of 50mg that comes in a package of ten ( I guess kinda like an epi pen ) and also it's available in vials ( like insulin for a diabetic). This to me doesn't sound too bad if given with the right combination of my other medications (with them being in gluten free pill form). So next time, I see my doctors this is our next thing we'll be trying. Hopefully this will work. It's seems better to take a shot of Benadryl now and then with a severe flare up ........ than having to take all my medications by injections in a central/pic line. Yes, I know, it's been a "pain" staking ordeal in many ways! LOL! But if any of this leads to some type of relief and regain my life back (not to mention not having to go to the hospital anymore!) I think I'll try it. I even have to worry about cross contamination at home with using house hold items such as utensils, plates/cups, pots and pans, etc. So I have my own that I only use as well as my own pre-made gluten free groceries and even the common items such as butter, peanut butter, etc.. But this is because of how severe my case of Celiac is. I have three teenagers and my oldest who's 19 years old, is the only one who developed any type of food allergy. She is allergic so far only to certain fruits, vegetables, and nuts. No signs of Celiac as of yet and hopefully she won't get it in the future. But she knows about the possibility of getting it later in life and has a great deal of knowledge of it by helping me deal with it. My two sons, ages 17 and 16, don't have any food allergies at all - only sinus allergies. I have read that Celiac Disease can be heretitary but I'm the first one in my family to have gotten it - well, as far as we know. My Mom has IBS as well as a few relatives on her side of the family too. There has been history of some other intestinal disorders also on her side of the family. I hope this has helped you in some way. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions. PS, sorry for this also being so long. I seem to "ramble" on too or get into more detail than needed, lol.