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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity

a ditmars

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  1. There is genetic testing available through If your daughter aready tested positive that would mean that either you or the childs father would also have the gene. If it were me, and I was expecting a baby I would get tested as soon as possible and also have the baby's father tested also. I my own case I wished I had known when I was nursing my son. I was passing gluten to him then and most likely when I was pregnant too. There is a huge link between cases of children and learning disablities, Autism, loads of other disorders that are connected with Celiac. The test is a cheek swabbing so it is simple to do on a small child also. Some say the testing (cost $150) is pricey but it sure beats the years of illness, testing and doctors visits my son had to endure before we finally found genetic testing. It turns out that both his Dad and I are gene carriers. Nearly every member of our extended family has now been diagnosed. Good Luck, Allison
  2. Hi Nikky, What I suggest is to try a gluten free diet with your niece. With some help from a good health food store, I started a dairy free diet with my son to start then went gluten free about a month later. In days after going gluten-free I saw a huge difference and it was easy to see that a gluten-free diet was doing good things for him. It wasn't until a year later that we finally got a diagnosis. Your sister should probably do some research first about hidden gluten, it seems to be in everything, also many folks with gluten intolerance have difficulties with soy and dairy proteins also. Making a change in diet could be an easy and inexpensive way to get started. Good luck. Allison
  3. Nikky, You might suggest your Aunt look into genetic testing through The test is a simple swabbing of the inside of the cheek, so it is easily done on a small child. My son is five and we had him tested with this lab, he tested positive for the gene for celiac. He had 5 different test done prior to this one. They all showed he did not have celiac, but like your neice he showed all the symptons of the disease. It is very common for blood and stool testing to come out negative, but the gene testing is the end all be all. Hope this helps. Allison
  4. Rachel, Thanks thats good advice. Some time ago my son had issues with yeast, prior to going gluten-free/CF, so your thinking is probably correct. I've started giving him activated charcoal and will try the epson salts baths. I had stopped these some time ago because they seemed to contribute to a loose bowel problem we were having but maybe the combination of the charcoal and baths will balance things out. I've among loads of other supplements that he has been taking have been giving him 300mg of Cal. Citrate prior to everymeal in hope this would help too. Poor kid, today he has blisters on his lips but in general is in a much better frame of mind. Perhaps we are past the worst of it. To anyone with a child on the austisic spectrum. The low oxalate diet is worth trying, minus the withdrawals and toxic dumping. My son's language has improved by leaps and bounds!!! Thanks again, Rachel Allison
  5. I hope someone can speak to the topic of Oxalate withdrawl or symptoms of "dumping" oxalates. I'm in the process of switching my already gluten-free/CF/SF kids to a low oxalate diet. We are in week 2 and they have all kinds of strange things going on. Has anyone else had nausia, vomiting, headache, blotchy rash, urinary pain, irritabilty and crying. Wondering how long this phase lasts, just trying to prepare myself for the long haul. Any thoughts or advice, greatly appreciated. Tired Mom, Allison