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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


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About crc0622

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  1. Tanya - how did they test you for celiac? You mentioned a colonoscopy for crohn's but you'll need very specific blood tests and/or an endoscopy for celiac. Dana - he can have any distilled vinegar. The only big no-no is any malt vinegar, as it is made from barley. Hope this helps! Celeste
  2. Food Labels

    Richard, We can always count on you to be the voice of reason, no matter which forum you are on! Thank you. Celeste
  3. Food Labels

    Keep in mind when you start the anger-mail that many companies who cannot absolutely certify that their items contain no wheat will have to start putting "may contain wheat" on their labels just to CYA. Those Fruity/Cocoa Pebbles, Corn Puffs, Malt-o-meal cereals, etc. you can almost be assured they would have to do that because they all warn about cross-contamination. It's a risk that you currently choose to take, but would you if it says on the label "may contain wheat"?? It's not just cereals - think of all the multitude of companies making every kind of product on our shelves who would have to start labelling this way - Kraft, Hershey, ConAgra, General Mills - companies we rely on to be straight with us. But if there is the slightest chance of CC, it would have to say "may contain wheat." Yes, we want some reasonable ideas about what is in our manufactured food, but if you do it in the way that it sounds from this thread, they'll start labeling it as such even when it may not be so. Even the labelling law which just passed did not include barley and rye as major allergens, so we'd still have to be on the lookout for them. And it did not include toiletries and probably never will. Proceed with caution, and don't over-exagerate the conquences. It is not like an anaphylactic peanut allergy. Celeste
  4. Fair Food?

    I have heard others say that those french fry stands are okay because all they cook in there are french fries. You could check with them to be sure, but it seems like it should be safe. Celeste
  5. Applebee's

    I wouldn't even trust the salad. From everything I have read, Applebees is one of those places to stay out of. That's fine for me - I never much liked them anyway. Salads are a major source of cross-contamination - often they are mixed in the same bowls, where croutons have been, dressings are slopped around, fried onions sometimes. Bad news. Unless you can see them make it with fresh gloves and ingredients that haven't been "dribbled" on, who knows! Celeste
  6. I think that if they are regularly smoking pot, the question as to whether it's gluten-free or not is kind of irrelevant . . . Celeste
  7. Penzey's has come out with two new Taco Seasonings, Bold and Chicken. I just called and they are both gluten-free. Their Original Taco Seasoning, however, is still the only one they carry that is not gluten-free. I love these spices. They are great quality and very good prices. If you order in larger quantities, the prices are even better. Celeste Jacksonville, FL
  8. Restaurants Gluten Free?

    I think I got glutened at Don Pablos a while back and I was very careful when ordering and asked a bunch of questions. There's always the possibility of contamination anytime you eat something you don't prepare yourself. If in doubt, don't! Celeste
  9. Gluten-free A Restaurant Cook's Perspective

    Unfortunately, due to the same thing that creates that wonderful seasoning, cast iron is a no-no for us! The gluten won't be scrubbed away (and what good cook would scrub their cast iron, anyway?)! Stainless steel and anodized aluminum is good - easy to scrub clean. Thanks for all the great info. I do tell everyone I can possibly tell when I have a good experience, Celiac or otherwise! And I try to let management know when a Chef does a really good job, too, even if it means a phone call the next day. They should know how much it is appreciated when their staff goes beyond the call of duty! Celeste
  10. Have you adjusted your plans due to the Hurricane?
  11. Nukapai: Sounds like all of your symptoms are pointing toward Celiac. As I have read on another Celiac forum, IBS means "I've Been Stumped" hahahaha Lay off any processed foods for a while and you won't have to worry about those nasty little hidden ingredients like "gluten-free wheat." Sounds like science fiction, doesn't it? Well, according to many, it's fiction, not science. There have been a lot of warnings about eating items marked gluten-free when traveling in Europe because they do recognize the wheat starch as being gluten-free, but it's really not and lots of people (including you, undoubtedly) have reactions to it. Hang in there! Celeste
  12. Gf Recipe Exchange

    Hello again, Canadian Karen. You stole my comment about delphi! I don't know how anyone could want any more recipes than are available there! Folks, if you don't visit delphi, you are missing out on a lot of good info - it's a different environment than this one (a little older crowd, I think) but we have several members who do both forums. Check it out.
  13. Cornmeal

    I don't think they are all gluten-free - esp if Bob's doesn't say gluten-free, it is probably not gluten-free. All his stuff is marked as gluten-free if it is. Some of the product lists have safe stuff on them. I would suspect Quaker has CC issues. Check delphi's list - it's the best I've seen. I know for sure that Adluh corn meal is on one of the lists, but you only may be able to find it in the south. Not sure where you are. Celeste
  14. Hello

    Sharon, Upon diagnosis, I too ran to my local healthy food store and bought a bunch of processed gluten-free stuff I didn't think I could live without. Well, most of those are still in the cupboard because I just don't eat much of the specialty stuff. There are a lot more options in your regular store than you realize. (Yes, Cheetos are gluten-free, even though some don't eat them due to cross contamination issues I have never had a problem with them.) I have found that the only thing I really can't find in a regular store is soy sauce (the jury is out on whether LaChoy is really gluten-free). I have purchased some cake, cookie, brownie mixes via mail order but requested that my commissary carry them AND THEY DO NOW! (I'm a Navy wife.) I did mail order some ready-made cookies, cinnamon bread and pizza crusts from Kathy's Creations and put them in the freezer. I'll eat a cookie every couple of days or so. I made my own mixes and put them in the freezer. That way if someone else is having sweets, I can too. I also bring them to work with me. I also found that Publix carries some cereals that are gluten-free and SuperTarget has a couple of Bob's Red Mill items that are gluten-free (not all are, though - watch the label - it will say gluten-free). I primarily eat meat, fresh veggies, potatos, rice, fruit. I have never had a problem with fruit that many have when first gluten-free. I love the stuff. We always try to make enough at supper to have leftovers for my lunch the next day. Eating out is not only difficult, it is very RISKY - always! Pay attention to your body - it may be good for you to keep a food diary of EVERYTHING you eat for the first month or two because it's easier to figure out where you might slip up that way. Read all you can - there are other forums besides this one that are good, too. You can join as many as you have time to read! I regularly visit 3: delphi, yahoo sillyyaks and here. All have a different "specialty" or flavor and you'll quickly develop a favorite. Good luck and hang in there. Celeste
  15. If you want a list, the best I have found is here: Scroll down a little on the first page and you'll see a gluten-free product list. It is updated pretty regularly. Baking soda is very hard on the teeth and gums. You'll soon have no gums!!