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Mike M

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About Mike M

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  1. Have you ever heard of a dairy pill called Lactaid? I am not suggesting that you take these on a regular basis, but what you might consider trying is picking some up, take one and see if it settles your stomach down and makes the nausea go away. If it does make it go away, you more than likely have an issue with dairy. If the Lactaid would happen to settle your stomach, I would still not do dairy while you heal up the intestines. Maybe you can try adding a little dairy just a little at a time in a few months. If it does not make a difference trying the Lactaid, you very well may be getting some small amounts of hidden gluten. Also, I can eat Lays Stax but not a lot and not everyday. They are in my opinion very gluten free, but do have some soy in them. The other posters made mention of the fast foods maybe not being such a good idea here in the beginning. It sure was not for me either. Hope this helps. All the best, Mike
  2. Not much LOL, (Farming that is) Mike
  3. Of course you know that beans in themselves are safe. If you are extra sensitive (what this thread was made for no?) there can be CC issues and gluten just does not wash off readily. The same equipment that harvests the beans in our area, also harvests the wheat. The winter wheat is taken off in early June around here and then the farmers "double crop" with beans. They just change the combine heads to do this at harvest time, using the same trucks and the same grain storage silos as the wheat. Mike
  4. Could have been, my web service was a bit glitchy yesterday, I'll post it again and in my opinion, it (the post) does need to be kept in the context of what was being discussed and also it needs to be kept in mind that is was posted on the sensitive area of this site. If someone out there is not getting better on the gluten free diet (and has ruled out other possible health issues) perhaps they could consider trying the approach that I and some others have tried (eliminating virtually all possible cross contamination chances) by making ALL of your own condiments. spices from whole and avoiding all processed foods. As always, all the best, Mike M Here is the post from yesterday: Wanted to second the "nailed it". I still use them on occasion. Am I glad I did use them and that they are available? Oh yes. I want to sum up real quick what I have learned from these strips (in no particular order). I have learned that just because the label on the package says "gluten free" means nothing to me. It more than likely has some amount of gluten in it (I had no idea this could be). I have learned that foods that don't even say "gluten free" on the label often times are indeed "cleaner" with regards to gluten content than their counterparts, (I am talking about gluten free ingredient foods here). I have learned that not all wines are safe just because the consensus of the celiac community say they are. Same goes for vinegar, I have found that unless they are naturally fermented (the wine/vinegar) I can not trust it, I react to store bought brands of vinegar. Name brand spices in general are often times CC'd including the ones that are organic. I grind all of my own from whole without any trouble and this includes black pepper and salt. I make my own ketchup, mustard, barbecue sauce. steak sauce, salad dressings like Italian ect ect again, because of the vinegar issue. I do use boxed tomatoes for the ketchup/barbecue sauce and add naturally fermented vinegar so it will keep. I also can it. I do grind my own whole mustard seeds and use whole tumeric (if you want to know the trick to making good mustard, let me know, there is a trick to it). I could not find a ground mustard seed that would pass the gluten test. Did you know that iodized salt also has corn in it (nothing to do with gluten, just one of the discoveries that I made along the way) It is put in there to preserve the iodine. I know I got one big education from using these test strips and just as sure as I am typing this message, they allowed me to heal in a very timely manner. Mike
  5. Oh, well I did post it twice. Is this the reason? Mike
  6. I really want to respond to your post, however, it looks like I am now being censored (my post I think was deleted, I posted it twice, the first time, I thought I made a posting mistake, posted it again and it is gone). In my opinion, (if this is the case) we are doing a great disservice to all posters, in particular "the newbies" if a poster can not discuss this disease in full detail and not withhold what they are finding without being censored, we as a community are doomed. All the best, Mike
  7. Wanted to second the "nailed it". I still use them on occasion. Am I glad I did use them and that they are available? Oh yes. I want to sum up real quick what I have learned from these strips (in no particular order). I have learned that just because the label on the package says "gluten free" means nothing to me. It more than likely has some amount of gluten in it (I had no idea this could be). I have learned that foods that don't even say "gluten free" on the label often times are indeed "cleaner" with regards to gluten content than their counterparts, (I am talking about gluten free ingredient foods here). I have learned that not all wines are safe just because the consensus of the celiac community say they are. Same goes for vinegar, I have found that unless they are naturally fermented (the wine/vinegar) I can not trust it, I react to store bought brands of vinegar. Name brand spices in general are often times CC'd including the ones that are organic. I grind all of my own from whole without any trouble and this includes black pepper and salt. I make my own ketchup, mustard, barbecue sauce. steak sauce, salad dressings like Italian ect ect again, because of the vinegar issue. I do use boxed tomatoes for the ketchup/barbecue sauce and add naturally fermented vinegar so it will keep. I also can it. I do grind my own whole mustard seeds and use whole tumeric (if you want to know the trick to making good mustard, let me know, there is a trick to it). I could not find a ground mustard seed that would pass the gluten test. Did you know that iodized salt also has corn in it (nothing to do with gluten, just one of the discoveries that I made along the way) It is put in there to preserve the iodine. I know I got one big education from using these test strips and just as sure as I am typing this message, they allowed me to heal in a very timely manner. Mik
  8. Wanted to second the "nailed it". I still use them on occasion. Am I glad I did use them and that they are available? Oh yes. I wanted to sum up real quick what I have learned from these strips (in no particular order). I have learned that just because the label on the package says "gluten free" means nothing to me. It more than likely has some amount of gluten in it (I had no idea this could be). I have learned that foods that don't even say "gluten free" on the label often times are indeed "cleaner" with regards to gluten content than their counterparts, (I am talking about gluten free ingredient foods here). I have learned that not all wines are safe just because the consensus of the celiac community say they are. Same goes for vinegar, I have found that unless they are naturally fermented (the wine/vinegar) I can not trust it, I react to store bought brands of vinegar. Name brand spices in general are often times CC'd including the ones that are organic. I grind all of my own from whole without any trouble and this includes black pepper and salt. I make my own ketchup, mustard, barbecue sauce. steak sauce, salad dressings like Italian ect ect again, because of the vinegar issue. I do use boxed tomatoe sauce for the ketchup/barbecue sauce and add naturally fermented vinegar so it will keep. I also can it, so I don't have to make it so often. I do grind my own whole mustard seeds and use whole tumeric (if you want to know the trick to making good mustard, let me know, there is a trick to it). I could not find a ground mustard seed that would pass the gluten test. Did you know that iodized salt also has corn in it (nothing to do with gluten, just one of the discoveries that I made along the way) It is put in there to preserve the iodine. I know I got one big education from using these test strips and just as sure as I am typing this message, they allowed me to heal in a very timely manner. Mike
  9. Oh man, I don't know how you can do the vegetarian deal, my hat goes off to you and everyone else that can pull this off. I just could not deal with it. They also have a lot of gluten free vegan choices. If you go, be sure and ask for the "gluten free" menu. They actually have one. At ours, they serve gluten free on a different plate so there is no confusion. Still getting more sensitive at 1.5 years.......Well, I think if we are the extra sensitive type and are still getting mild gluttenings on a somewhat regular basis (every week or two) the antibodies just are not going to go away. As of right now (knocking on wood real hard here) I seem to be getting less sensitive (dang I hope I did not jinx myself). All the best, Mike
  10. That is a bummer, sorry to hear about it. I just snapped out of my recent glutening yesterday. Every time I think to myself....What if I don't come out of it this time? So far, I always have, just has to run its course. Do you have a P.F. Chang's anywhere near you? I mean, it would be worth a road trip once in a while to give yourself a break and a treat in my opinion. I was talking to the manager at our local Bistro and he said he has some celiacs that drive an hour and a half to come to their location. Knock on wood, I have not been glutened yet eating there and I am sure it has been at least 15 times in the last 6 months and this is at three different locations. They take gluten free real serious and have a dedicated area in the kitchen with dedicated cookware and plates. Gluten free lettuce wraps and gluten free Chang's spicy chicken are my favorites. Hope you get to feeling better soon. Mike
  11. I wanted to say thank you to all that mention adding this. I have seen your posts on here about it and to be honest, never gave it much thought. I picked some up and I can't believe the difference it is making. All the best, Mike
  12. Hello, I think Enterolab is another valid choice that can be used to diagnose gluten intolerance. You don't have to go for all of the testing all at once. They will keep the stool sample for up to six months. Example, you could send the sample there and just have the Fecal antigliadin IgA antibody test done. If it is positive, you may want to have other tests done that they perform, like for other food intolerance's (egg, milk,soy ect ect). You can pay as you go. If your test is positive for a gluten intolerance, I would highly suggest following up with a good GI Doctor that understands gluten issues. Keep in mind, they (Enterolab) will not give you a Celiac diagnosis. It will really help you long term to know for sure if you have an issue or not. There can be value in seeing it in "black and white" (writing). There can be times when it is natural to have doubts as you navigate a gluten free lifestyle. Hope this helps, Mike Edit: I forgot to mention I also used them (sorry). Enterolab was my first step. I called a Doctor that I knew and told him of the positive results and he sent me to his personal GI Doc who took it from there. The positive results from Enterolab was truly a life changing moment for me. It was the answer/reason for my life long ill health that no other doctors could figure out.
  13. I can't help you with the Almond meal (that one I'm allergic to) I use Peter and Paul Coconut flour/fiber. It is certified organic and I buy it at our local health food store. Here is a customer service number off of the bag (905) 768-1152 or (905) 768-3251 I don't react to it and it also tested negative with the EZ gluten test strip (I trust these tests when done under the right conditions) All the best, Mike
  14. Hello Ohio, Some will say you don't need to check topical items (things you put on your body). Others (me included) will say it does matter. But first, let me suggest you get tested for Celiac. It is really important to know if you have Celiac. If you should have a negative test result, don't give up and think you are in the clear, you can still have gluten intolerance. This is also a very serious issue. If you have Celiac/Gluten intolerance, yes, you gotta check everything out. With your Mom having "it" You really need to get tested before going gluten free for an accurate test to be done in my opinion. When you find something out, post it. There are some really helpful folks on here that will steer you in the right direction! All the best, Mike
  15. I think one thing we can all agree on is that we all seem to have different reaction levels to gluten. I posted this info because it was so frustrating getting glutened and not knowing why. I want to know why. So I did some serious research on this. I have read over and over that "all wines are safe" and "so are vinegars" for that matter. Well, I am discovering, this is not the case. A lot of the old timer's (celiac's) will not touch vinegars with a ten foot pole. All they knew was they got a reaction. I am pretty sure we now know why. P.S. Maybe I need to step it down a notch and give up the pricier stuff! After this last glutening, I am not quite ready for another experiment. This one was really rough. I do hope we can all sit at the Celiac/Gluten intolerant table together (this web site) and give one another a little elbow room so to speak. Mike