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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


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About photobabe42

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  • Birthday 08/08/1979

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  • Gender Female
  • Location Springfield, Ohio
  1. Workplace And Celiac

    I am appalled that people even have the incredible, ahem, STONES, to think or act like this. While the newspaper industry is having many problems, I am thankful that I still have a job (for now) and that I am surrounded by intelligent people who are full of curiosity and investigative skills. The photo staff (myself and two others) are known to be very food oriented. We go out to eat often and I don't have desk drawers more than I have a three-tiered pantry. However, when I suspected that I had issues with gluten (and later, dairy) it took less than a week to educate my fellow photographers to my new diet. I made it a point to research what I can eat at any given restaurant in town, and now we go only to places where I can eat at least one thing safely. The company potlucks have not been an issue. I bring more than one dish that I can eat, and at least one or two people always bring in foods that they know I can eat. We're not talking a bag of tortilla chips either, we're talking a DISH. No one minds if I bring my own food to meetings and who ever goes for coffee never fails to remember my soy milk chai latte. Many comment on how much healthier I look these days, and I always try to make sure I express my thanks when my co-workers make efforts to include and feed me. I am very sorry for those of you with self-absorbed co-workers. I can only suggest that patience, leading by example, and in cases of last resort, sarcasm and the HR department, will help your situation. Stock up on yummies at work so you don't go hungry, request fridge access if you need it. Best of luck!
  2. Purely Decadent cookie dough is awesome, especially melting over a bowl of hot apple crisp... Or with a dollop of peanut butter. But I say that about everything.
  3. Yeah I know, what a bummer! I went gluten-free during football season this year and I always keep Twizzlers in my camera bag to munch on during plays. Well, not anymore. I've switched to Starburst!
  4. Red Robin!

    Went to the Red Robin in Beavercreek, Ohio yesterday after my sister and mom insisted that we now only eat at places with published gluten-free menus or food lists. They are so sweet! Well, I gotta tell you, I was impressed. Hostess provided their menu covering all eight allergens, and actually had suggestions of what other gluten-free folks have liked. Waitress. Christine, told me their fryer was dedicated and said the cooks clean the grill as often as needed/requested and would be happy to do so for me. I ordered a grilled chicken salad that had egg and bacon on it, with the creamy caesar dressing that is on the gluten-free menu and melon slices on the side. Delicious! I also loved that the waitress did not "hover" over us and we had a nice relaxing meal with everyone enjoying what they ordered. I took both a comment card and the manager's business card so that I can write a nice thank-you note about Christine. I felt like they do take ALL allergies seriously and I think I am very comfortable going there again. Three cheers for Red Robin! I should mention I make a point of not going to any chain restaurant at peak dining hours, I feel that my needs get better attention that way. At least, it makes me feel better! I'm trying the salmon burger next!
  5. Tried some Bob's Biscuit and Baking mix for cookies and they tasted a bit odd and noticeably had a different texture than my pre-gluten-free cookie recipes. I love their Mighty Tasty hot cereal but I will be trying Pamela's baking mix and something the fiance bought at Whole Foods in my next experiments. I've had good luck with plain ol' cornstarch in stews. It's what my mom always used so I guess my family is used to it by now!
  6. Help! I Have To Travel Sorta.....

    When I have a full day on the road with photo assignments and I'm know that packing food will be the best option as far as time, health, and money, I take a cooler with the following... Fork, spoon and butter knife! (At least the spoon...) Trail mix Jell-o cups with fruit gluten-free cookies (I save them specifically for times like these) Fresh fruit and veggies Fruit cups gluten-free jerky (again, a treat for these special situations) JIF individual servings of peanut butter (comes in a six pack) Rice cakes, chips, or gluten-free cereal that's easy to handle Lara Bars or Soy Joy (many other are available, these are two of the least expensive options) Juice/milk boxes that don't have to be refrigerated Sweet potato or apple chips I'm usually only gone during the day, so I try not to take anything that needs to be refrigerated. BUT if I take some meat or cheese, I usually eat that earlier rather than later. I used to go through a lot of pudding cups before I started avoiding casein. Also, since a lot of these foods are "dense" remember to drink a lot of water! Just think, it's like camping! Although, just like with camping, even a microwave would help. Could you get a hot plate or hot pot to boil water with? That would give you a few more options like instant grits, hot beverages, soup, etc. Good luck!
  7. About Ready To Eat A Tree!

    Good idea about the stores that carry gluten-free items! One of the best things I ever learned when I worked at Kroger is the schedule for mark-downs of fresh and perishable items. If you shop at any grocery store regularly you will begin to notice a pattern. Also, the stock people can be very helpful with this type of information. It's always who you know... you know? I stock up on meat and cheese the last 7-10 days of the month. Organic juices and smoothies, soy "dairy" products, the fresh alternative milks, and fruits and veggies may be marked down as often as every other week. Check the expiration dates and then show up a two or three days ahead of that for the best pick. LOTS of stuff freezes well! Lastly, having a "shoppers" card at some stores can help a lot, and clipping coupons is a must. You can find many coupons online! And my local health foods store always has a clearance bin that I rout regularly, it's a great way to try new foods and stock up on basics like flours. I'll second the taters idea. Eggs and home fries is one of my favorite all-time meals.
  8. About Ready To Eat A Tree!

    When I was in college, diagnosed with Crohn's (but not Celiac at the time) I used to HATE the dining hall food and how horribly my system did with it. Besides getting access to a kitchen in my building and cooking a lot of inexpensive basics, my friends and I made it a point to volunteer at a local ministry that hosted a midnight pancake and egg breakfast as well as other free meals. We worked and then we ate. I can still remember my friend Colin, who was a dx'd Celiac, looking so pleased at a huge plate of scrambled eggs, made in a clean pan, after the event. So if you're not keen on the idea of taking charity, there are many ways to "earn" some help. I always found this to be more palatable when I was in those moods when I wanted to not think of myself as NEEDING help. Many of the food pantries around here work to "pull" certain foods from donations specifically for folks with dietary restrictions, and they are always looking for volunteers! Think of it as a win-win situation. Good luck! PS. Maybe we should start a "sponsor a student" program? It's a difficult time for anyone, healthy or not.
  9. This is my first year eating and cooking Gluten-free Casein-free for Thanksgiving. My mom is a great cook and while she is open to new ideas, such as my new diet, I prefer to lead by example. I offered up front to cook the stuffing (based some some yummy-sounding recipes I saw here) and two desserts (one pumpkin-inspired, one apple crisp or possibly something chocolate). Nothing else should have any gluten in it, although I asked my mom to keep the gravy packet so I could check the ingredients. I will have to double check with her on if the sweet potatoes have butter in them BUT I can eat a LOT of turkey and other things if the taters don't work out. Mom was very proud to serve me pot roast, carrots and mashed potatoes last week that complied with my diet. (And oh wow was it good! I am so making pot roast this week.) She also accompanies me on trips to a health food store near her house and she's great at label reading. So I have no worries that I can "fit in" new diet and all. As far as leftovers, my family all brings their own containers and we make "mini meals" -- enough to go around so that everyone can enjoy a second dinner... or lunch... or snack. Who doesn't love Thanksgiving food? We actually do Thanksgiving inspired family dinners year-round because everyone loves it and it's not hard to make it healthy!
  10. Upper endoscopy is about as easy as tests get. You fast for eight hours and then get some awesome "twilight sleep" drugs which means you are technically awake but you won't remember a thing. The test is very quick and there is maybe an hour or two of waking up depending on your body weight and blood pressure. I was freaked the first time I did one because I have a major choking phobia. Let me tell you, it was a breeze. Or if it's easier, just be serious about your diet. But the test ain't so bad.
  11. My Birthday

    Happy Birthday! I was feeling blah today from something I ate, maybe the chili peppers, who knows... too blah to work out or do much of anything this morning including eat... so I made a double batch of the Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies I found on the Cooking & Baking thread and when I finally dragged myself to work, I fed my co-workers my latest Gluten-free Casein-free baking experiment. I got rave reviews for the cookies and ended up feeling better over the course of the day. One co-worker gave me his "secret" recipe for a flourless chocolate cake to see if I could make it to fit my diet. I love the support I'm getting at my workplace and even before I was gluten-free, cooking for others always cheered me up no matter what. I'm going home on my dinner break to spoil my dog with something yummy too. He deserves it since he always makes me smile. I really hope you can find something to improve your day. I'm sorry it's so sucky! If I couldn't bake, I'd probably go shopping. Would you take a rain check on some chocolate cake??
  12. Holiday Work Party..uggghhh!

    My company, a newspaper, does a holiday potluck during the work day, instead of a sit-down affair. This is done since it's less expensive (I'd rather the company increase my bonus than serve a mundane dinner) and since I work for a newspaper, there's really no time that everyone can attend such a function. Since I have only recently gone gluten free, I haven't really expected too much from my co-workers. Mostly I'm explaining my diet changes one-on-one and everyone has been very understanding. My boss even brought a veggie tray to our usual pizza dinner on the lengthy shift that was Election night. I was touched by the gesture. Before I worked here, there was a lady who had Celiacs and was very open about it, PLUS there was also a reporter my age who had a ton of food allergies, so the department has been "schooled" so to speak. Everyone is forthcoming with ingredients during the potlucks and I will probably bring more than one dish so I can have a round meal. I'm lucky I think to work with people who exercise intelligent curiosity as part of the job. As far as bringing your own food, Tupperware used to make some great divided dishes. People bring food for their kids in similar situations, I don't think anyone should be rude enough to judge you. You are there to have a good time! Pack up your food (preferably something vastly superior to the slop everyone else will be eating) and then enjoy your evening on your terms.
  13. My sister and I still talk about MockLate! And Fishtaschios! Great episode, thanks for making me laugh. I've been having issues with Hershey's, interesting...
  14. Trader Joe's

    Turkey Bologna (applegate farms I think) Tropical Granola Gluten-free Casein-free brownie mix sipping chocolate sweet potato soup in a box trail mix of any variety gluten-free ginger snaps sweet potato french fries gluten-free cookie dough (haven't tried it, heard it's good) Rice Milk Many gluten-free options will be marked on the shelf making it easy to find BUT don't rely on this. Some of their gluten-free offerings that are naturally gluten-free are not marked gluten-free. Does that make sense? We have a small store here in Ohio and so our Trader Joe's does not stock 100% of their gluten-free offerings here. Sometimes I do better at the local health foods store but Trader Joe's is a lot of fun. Happy shopping!
  15. Butter Sub

    Just tried Earth Balance yesterday after discovering it at Kroger. Not bad! Made a great apple-crisp too!