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IAtodd

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About IAtodd

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  • Birthday 07/14/1970

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  • Interests
    baking, volleyball, gardening, birding, running, golfing
  • Location
    Orange City, Iowa
  1. My IGA levels were too low to be conclusive and I've not done the biopsy. I've been gluten-free for 3+ years and at first, if I accidentally ate wheat, I would get the stabbing abdominal pain like I had suffered with all my life. Now if I eat gluten (once every few months... most recently, the topping picked off of one slice of Pizza Hut pizza), I don't get the abdominal pain... I just have neurological effects much more severely than I ever have (hypersensitive skin, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, lethargy... I'm assuming my intestine has healed up and a little dose of gluten doesn't wreak the havoc that it used to). I don't think the antibodies themselves would cause the neurological problems, if that's what you're asking...
  2. I'd say don't do the biopsy. I was given that choice when my blood test came back as IGA-deficient and thus useless. Why destroy your body for a month and then cough up lots of money just to be "sure"? Will knowing change your lifstyle? Will you magically be able to eat normal food just because you are "sure"? Nope. So why punish your body more than it's already been punished? If someone has a counter-argument, I would love to hear it. BTW, you COULD do a blood test for a gluten allergy (RAST test)... if that comes back negative but gluten makes you sick, then by process of elimination it seems to me that it would have to be celiac disease. I haven't doen the RAST test ($$$) yet but will within the next year or so. If the RAST test tests positive for a gluten allergy, then it's possible that you'd have both an allergy AND celiac disease...
  3. Hi Purple et al... Thanks for the suggestion on the Hamantaschen! I tried this recipe and made thumbprint cookies instead of the triangles, and they turned out great: http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/cookingg...Hamantashen.htm I ended up baking them for an extra 5 minutes or so, and I used sweet rice flour for coating the dough balls. I also used low-sugar Smuckers raspberry jam (not one of the jams in the recipe). I haven't decided whether the cookies need to be sprinkled with powdered sugar... Probably not worth the extra putziness. Tomorrow I tackle gingerbread men! Too bad I can't figure out which one of the 5 recipes I printed out last year I actually used...
  4. I'd have to agree on the Enjoy Life packaged cookies, but sadly, my son is allergic to soy and nuts too, so most of the other packages cookies aren't safe so I end up being extra motivated to make my own. I suppose taking the eggs out of a cookie is going to make for baking problems...
  5. Thanks purple! I see that the eatingglutenfree recipe has you partially bake the cookie before filling it, and that was one idea I had... thought it might help the cookie keep its shape. I've also seen some mention of refrigerating the dough before baking. I'm thinking I might dare try again with both recipes (keeping the nuts out of the eatingglutenfree recipe since my son is allergic to them as well. Or I might try to hybridize the two recipes and see what happens. Thanks again!
  6. Hi all, We recently purhased the EnjoyLife cookie cookbook and have been attempting to make cookies usingseveral of the recipes, but they've all been flops. e.g., The thumbprint cookies I made last night spread out across my cookie sheet... The first half dozen balls seemed too dry when I pushed my thumb in (they cracked), so I added a tiny bit more milk to the dough and then the rest of the balls seemed to have the right consistency, but all of the cookies, including the dryer ones, spread all over and didn't look anything like the photo in the book. Also, my wife has tried making 2 kinds of bars, and they both ended up with that doesn't-matter-how-long-you-bake-it gummy nastiness that we've all experienced. We've been baking gluten-free for 2+ years with much success, so it's not like I don't know what we're doing.... I just cannot fathom that someone would have compiled a bunch of nasty, useless recipes into a cookbook... Thanks in advance for any insights y'all might be able to share. Oh, and if anyone has a recipe for edible, presentable thumbprint cookies, PLEASE pass it along. IAtodd
  7. Nope... The only thing I use egg replacer in is Chocolate chip cookies (Bette Hagman's recipe.. which also uses regular eggs). But I can't imagine egg replacer NOT working. My son is sensitive to food dyes, which is one reason I didn't frost these cupcakes (of course they HAVE to put blue food dye in white frosting )... too lazy and cheap to make my own frosting. One other thing to mention... I used the middle-sized shredder, so there were no big strings of squash in the cupcakes. If you make them, let me know how they turn out. I'm getting so many yellow squash that I may try to chocolate version with yellow squash next time. I may even try a layer cake... can't trurn out any worse than the last several layer cakes we've attempted... Oh, suggestion: Use all oil unless you are used to subbing applesauce. I think the all-oil version is better, but I've never been a huge fan of the applesauce subbing thing... and I've lost enough weight not being able to eat all the junk food I used to eat that I couldn't care less about the volume of oil in the recipe. Also, I've decided the double-chocolate version of the zucchini cupcakes are better than the regular chocolate amount. I'm actually wondering now whether this recipe might work with shredded apples. I'll try it when apple season is here and post the results,
  8. I posted a gluten-free chocolate zucchini cupcake recipe last month, and I tried making a vanilla yellow squash version in an attempt to use up some of our oodles of yellow squash. They turned out great so I wanted to pass along the info. Here's the link to the original allrecipes.com recipe: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Chocolate-Zuc...kes/Detail.aspx Here's my modification for the gluten-free choc zucchini version and my new vanilla yellow squash version: "Very similar to the Taste-of-Home cupcakes we used to make before we went gluten-free and threw out the recipe. Anyhow, these make great gluten-free cupcakes, with the following modification to the original recipe: Use 2 cups of Carol's sorghum blend (35% sorghum flour, 35% corn or potato starch, and 30% tapioca starch), plus 1 1/2 tsp of guar gum (or 1 tsp xanthan gum). I also went with 1/2 cup applesauce and 1/2 cup oil, and doubled the chocolate, although I actually thought they were TOO chocolaty (this from a chocoholic)... but I think I was used to the taste of home recipe that wasn't very chocolaty. I think with the original amt of chocolate they could pass as "muffins" (sounds healthier) but with the doubled chocolate they are definitely "cupcakes"... actually, they are more like brownies, as my 5-year-old son pointed out. BTW, I also had to increase the baking time considerably (~35 minutes). FYI: I made another gluten-free batch again substituting yellow squash in place of zucchini and 1 1/2 tsp vanilla instead of the chocolate, and all oil instead of my original applesauce substitution. They turned out GREAT. I might have considered putting vanilla frosting on them but the kids gobbled them up anyhow, so I didn't bother. They turned out carrot-cakish, so if I want a carrot cupcake I'll just use this recipe and throw in some carrots too." BTW, I think I threw in some extra guar gum (maybe 1/2 tsp) for the vanilla yellow squash version b/c I was worried the batter wasn't setting up right. I think the batter just needed to sit for a few minutes and the extra guar gum wasn't necessary. But throwing in a little extra is cheaper than throwing away goo, so I'll probably keep throwing in a little extra...
  9. I just modified a chocolate zucchini muffin recipe that I found on allrecipes.com. I don't normally like experimenting with recipes (the flops are very expensive), but we used to make the Taste-of-Home version (could be the same recipe for all I know) way back when, and I missed them enough to try to make a gluten-free version. Anyhow, it worked well, so I thought I'd share the recipe with those of you who are equally unwilling to experiment: Link to recipe: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Chocolate-Zuc...kes/Detail.aspx My posted modifications: Very similar to the Taste-of-Home cupcakes we used to make before we went gluten-free and threw out the recipe. Anyhow, these make great gluten-free cupcakes, with the following modification to the original recipe: Use 2 cups of Carol's sorghum blend (35% sorghum flour, 35% corn or potato starch, and 30% tapioca starch), plus 1 1/2 tsp of guar gum (or 1 tsp xanthan gum). I also went with 1/2 cup applesauce and 1/2 cup oil, and doubled the chocolate, although I actually thought they were TOO chocolaty (this from a chocoholic)... but I think I was used to the taste of home recipe that wasn't very chocolaty. I think with the original amt of chocolate they could pass as "muffins" (sounds healthier) but with the doubled chocolate they are definitely "cupcakes"... actually, they are more like brownies, as my 5-year-old son pointed out. BTW, I also had to increase the baking time considerably (~35 minutes).
  10. Happy birthday and may God bless you tiday!

  11. We've attempted Carol Fenster's (1000 gluten-free recipes) corn bread recipe several times and have found that to get anything resembling a fully baked product, we have to bake it for 45 minutes rather than 25, and our first attempt with the white cake was woefully underbaked even after baking it for far longer that the instructed amount of time. Our over is new and its temp is accurate (so that's not the issue), and we were using gray teflon cake pans for the cake and a cast iron skillet (the first several times), a pyrex pie plate (I think), and the gray teflon bake pan (tonight only... the one that was closest to fully baked at 45 minutes). The bake times for her other recipes seem to be pretty close, so I thought I'd check on the forum to see whether anyone has any suggestions for us or can at least corroborate our observations. Thanks in advance! IAtodd
  12. Funny you should mention switching brands... We were up in Minneapolis visiting the inlaws, and they made Quaker corn grits, which we doubted were truly safe, but we didn't want to seem overparanoid, so we said they were fine. Six hours later our son went mental in Home Depot. Now, I also gave him a few ounces of diet 7-up earlier in the day, and he has probably had Nutrasweet only 2 or 3 times ever (he's 5 BTW), so we figure it was either the grits or the Nutrasweet... or he was just acting out the way just about any other 5 year old would every so often. Of course, he's also slightly allergic to peas and the inlaws made dinner with peas in it two days previous, but peas only make him cough (so far as we know, and we gave him Benadryl)... so I suppose it could have been the after-effects of the peas. In any case, thanks for the info on the Arrowhead Mills corn grits. I can't wait to try them!
  13. Hi all, I have a question about corn grits. We have been eating Bob's Red Mill corn grits, and for the first year or so of being gluten-free we seemed to be ok, but for the past ~6 mnonths my 5-year-old who acts hyper and mental (to put it bluntly) when he eats wheat started having frequent "relapses" after eating corn grits. My wife (also gluten-sensitive) started not feeling so well eating the grits too... but it's not like they go into anaphalactic shock, so we're not really sure about the grits. We switched to millet grits, but I persoanlly think they taste repulsive, and we had a bag of corn grits in the freezer, so I made some for myself and millet grits for the rest of the fam. Two days later I am having a hypersensitive skin episode that is extremely rare for me now that I've gone wheat-free. No other probs have arisen yet (BTW, we all went gluten-free after my son was tested, and maladies that I've suffered for my whole life have largely vanished... you know how it goes!). Long story short, have others had probs with Bob's Red Mill? If so, do you have any suggestions for an alternative brand? Thanks in advance! Todd T.
  14. Sorry... My original reply got buried in my accidental quoting of the original message, so I don't know whether you have even noticed that it's there. What follows is what I originally posted, but I just logged in to correct what I said about Bette Hagman's choc chip cookie flour... She says to use the 4-flour mix (not the gluten-free flour mix). The 4-flour mix is basically the equivalent of Bob's Red Mill's all purpose gluten-free baking flour (garbanzo, sorghum, tapioca, and fava bean). Anyhow, here's my original response: Remember: You are making chocolate chip cookies! If you want them to be good for you, then they aren't going to taste very good! Shortening would probably work better than oil. And I've never heard of butter having soy in it. I use Bette Hagman's choc chip cookie recipe, which calls for 2 sticks butter or margarine (talk about not good for you)! I've only used butter. It also calls for egg replacer (added in powder form) AND egg. I have accidentally left out the egg replacer and they are still good. I'm guessing you can use egg replacer (dissolved in water as per instructions) in the recipe in place of the egg. Could your problem be the lack of xanthum gum? Also, coconut flour sucks up liquid so you need to add liquid AND extra eggs if you are using coconut flour. I'll bet that's your problem. Try a flour that is 6 parts white rice to 2 parts corn starch (Bette calls for potato starch) to 1 part tapioca. New: If you want to use coconut flour, there are tips online for substituting it for other kinds of flour... i.e., how many extra eggs and how much extra liquid to use.
  15. Someone (in a different thread, I guess) suggested I try using buckwheat flour as a substitute for coconut flour (instead of using tapioca flour, as I listed in the recipe). I tried this recipe with buckwheat instead of tapioca yesterday, and my wife thought the muffins tasted the same. I liked them a little better with the tapioca, but they are good either way. I also cut down even more on the chocolate chips this time around. If you REALLY like chocolate chips in your muffins, then use what the recipe calls for. We have two little kids eating the muffins, and we got tired of melted chocolate all over their faces and hands and clothes and the high chair tray (my 1 year old daughter even started crying the other day b/c she thought the melted chip on her finger was a bug, and she is terrified of bugs). Long story short, use either flour and cutting down on the chips a bit might be worth your while if you are trying this recipe.