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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


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About kayo

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  1. These are a life saver for when you just *need* a brownie: I swear if I ever meet George I'm kissing him.
  2. Burritos!

    Amy's makes a great gluten-free burrito. One with cheese and one without.
  3. I'm already packed - let's go!
  4. I don't eat Vans because they contain soy. Soy gives me a worse reaction than gluten. Is it possible soy bothers you too?
  5. For Those Of You With Soy Allergy...

    I can have the oil once in a while and not too much. I do my best to avoid it. I'm not sure if lecithin bothers me or not because I avoid it too. Chocolate gives me major heartburn and that's the only thing that I see soy lecithin in alone that I could try for an experiment.
  6. What Helps You Fight Cravings?

    Udi's and Kinnikinnik make great muffins. There are also frozen gluten-free pizzas and pizza crusts available if you don't bake. I was never much of a baker before but have dusted off my apron and now I bake regularly. I still prefer cooking over baking but nothing beats a craving like something warm and fresh out of the oven or bread machine.
  7. I experienced it as well and I'm not even what I would consider very sensitive. It was early on in the diet, maybe just a few months, we walked into a restaurant and passed their pizza making area where they make the dough, the pizzas/calzones and bake them in the open fireplace ovens. I got so dizzy and light headed and woozy. I couldn't concentrate. I felt drunk or tipsy. All I wanted to do was lay down. The feeling passed after about 10-15 minutes. I have been to the same restaurant since and have not had any reactions. It was the oddest thing.
  8. I missed the negatives too. Maybe I need new I firmly believe more genes are associated with celiac and many that are yet to be discovered. I'm DQ4 and DQ5 and though my tests were negative due to being gluten-free at the time of testing my doc firmly believes I have celiac. My sister is also celiac and is awaiting gene testing.
  9. MacieMay, My understanding is that DQ2 and DQ8 are the recognized celiac genes. Quick google shows: Genetic predisposition plays a key role in celiac disease and considerable progress has been made recently in identifying genes that are responsible for celiac disease predisposition. It is well known that celiac disease is strongly associated with specific HLA class II genes known as HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 located on chromosome 6p21. From:
  10. Wow, talk a about a troll fest over there on the mythbuster's thread. That one person needs a hobby! I cant take anyone seriously when they condescendingly start a reply with, now ladies... I just registered so I can also request they tackle how easily, or not, gluten can be destroyed on cookware and utensils. I think that would make for a very interesting experiment. How happy would we all be to find out hot soapy water does the trick?
  11. I second this request. I'm missing spring rolls something fierce. I've tried some rice wrappers but they get very sticky when fried. I'm going to try some technique used to make har gow using tapioca and rice starch. I'm not SCD, though I am FODMAP. I'm always intrigued by new foods and techniques.
  12. Whats Your 'go-To' Meal

    I use Hellman's Canola mayo. No soy oil. It's quite good. I have tried some other brands but they tasted weird to me. If you're looking for a soy free cooking spray (also hard to find) check out Pam for Grilling. I swear I read 20 cans of spray before reading about this one on the board. Soy free tuna can be found at Trader Joe's. My go to meals are: - tuna on crackers or Udi's bread. I like the Schar table crackers since they remind me of ritz or club crackers. - omelette made with lactose free yogurt cheese, found at Trader Joe's, with tater tots - soup from my freezer. I make big batches of soup and then freeze individual containers. - Amy's mac n cheese (the gluten-free and dairy/soy free version made with Daiya) - rice noodles with frozen veggies and some chicken stock and lemon - Chipotle, for when I really don't want to cook!
  13. Once I went gluten free I noticed my symptoms didn't fully go away. I had roaming pain too. I had more tests and found out I had SIBO. I likely had it for years but going gluten-free really highlighted it. I was also tested for fructose malabsorption but that came back negative. Other things to consider: other food allergies, ulcers, colitis, Crohn's, diverticulitis, candida, giardia and other parasites. Hopefully his endoscopy test helps figure it out. You don't owe his sister or anyone an explanation. Her eye rolling, her misunderstanding is her problem to solve, not yours. Please don't be burdened by such people. Do your best to ignore them. The more confidence you show in the decisions you make the less flack you'll get from others. When they see they can't bother you with their negativity they give up. Trust me, I speak from experience
  14. I do believe people when they have a stronger or milder reaction than I'm familiar with. Each of us are different, our immune systems are in varying stages of strength and the disease itself falls along a range (mild villi atrophy to severe - for example). I have had gluten exposure and should have had a reaction and didn't and then have had horrible reactions to what I can only chalk up to trace amounts. I strongly feel the state of my immune system at the time of exposure determines the outcome. But that's me, and my body, and my experience. I see this mentioned on the board a lot and it boggles my mind. Regardless of reaction (mild or severe) it's in our own best interest and health longevity to be 100% gluten-free. Doctors don't tell diabetics to not follow their diet because it's hard. The same should go for us. I guess where one could split hairs is if 'gluten free' labeled manufactured food is safe. I think that's an individual call and up to the person to determine. A dedicated bakery that does not use gluten containing items and operates in a gluten free facility is very safe in my opinion. Food labeled, 'made on a line that is shared with wheat' is very questionable regardless of testing. Hopefully stricter standards, guidelines and labeling will take the guess work out of the equation.