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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


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About Smoly

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  • Gender Female
  • Location London, Ontario
  1. Hi there, I'm curious about some of the El Peto products but haven't had much luck finding many reviews. There bread feels incredibly brick like so it's made me nervous about trying their other products. I'm particulary interested in the ready-made products like the lemon tarts and empty tart shells but I'd love to hear feedback on anything they offer. Thanks.
  2. They are not available in Canada yet. I emailed Betty Crocker a couple of months ago and they did not indicate they had any plans to bring their gluten-free products here although they said they would take note of my interest and pass it on. I suggest everyone who is interested in getting their products in Canada email them to let them know. I currently get friends/family to buy their stuff when they go over the border. Btw, I'm also in London, Ontario so I have a good knowledge of where to go for the good stuff around here. Let me know if you have any questions.
  3. I had myself on the wait list but I guess he's a popular guy because I wasn't able to get in any sooner. Unfortunately, the appointment was not helpful and the doctor doesn't think I need a biopsy since my bloodwork was negative. He felt that I just need to take Metamucil every day and my problems will be solved. Since I'm not having any further testing done for celiac I'm going to do a gluten-free trial just to see what happens.
  4. I've never seen the Omnipod in action so I don't know much about how it stands up to sweating and how easily it's removed. I disconnect my Minimed when I shower swim and the site stays really secure. You can always put some extra tape on tape if you want some extra security though. Movement shouldn't affect the pump since many athletes use them on a daily basis. I wouldn't drop it or use it in a martial arts class but it's a pretty tough little device. One thing to note about the Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS) is that you still have to test your sugars the old-fashioned way at least 4 times a day to calibrate the machine. It's also advised to test whenever you have a result that is high or low. The CGMS is meant to show you trends and alert you to upcoming changes as there can be a delay between the CGMS and real-time blood sugar results. There is a great forum called Insulin Pumpers that can answer just any question you might have about pumping. It was invaluable when I first started on a pump.
  5. Doctor'S "Diagnosis"

    I'm debating on whether or not it's worth the wait to see a new doctor since it took so long for me to get into this one. He did some blood work to check for inflammatory responses as well as for Total IgA. He said that if the bloodwork indicates inflammation, he'll do a colonoscopy (woohoo ) but was pretty dismissive regarding any further testing/investigation. I'll wait until I get the bloodwork results back and then will talk about it with my family doctor (who seems to know a lot more than he does as she was the one who suggested that the bloodwork often gave false negatives). I've had 2 TTG IgA tests done which were 0.2 and 2.2 in July and October of last year, no other celiac tests though.
  6. I've been on an insulin pump for over 7 years and it has made a world of difference. I take a break for a day or two every now and then and go back to the shots. That never lasts long because it just reminds me of the reasons I went on the pump in the first place. There are so many options for insulin delivery that allow for such a personalized approach to your diabetes. Nights were always a struggle for me before the pump but they're much more stable now. It is also so much more convenient and practical. You might have something physically attached to you but I don't think it's any worse than having to carry insulin and syringes everywhere. In fact, it's very nice to not have to find a clean place to give an injection in public. Expense shouldn't be a concern since Ontario now covers pumps and supplies for Type 1 diabetics. You get used to it very quickly and will soon forget it's there. I usually wear mine on a leg strap around my calf so no-one even notices i. I've never had an infection and that shouldn't be an issue if you change your sites regularly. I leave mine on for up to a week and no problems at all. I like my Minimed because you can get the sensors and glucose transmitter with it. The sensors are great when you need to establish what your patterns are. Feel free to ask me any questions I haven't answered. Btw, did your celiac disease have any effect on your blood sugar levels before you were diagnosed?
  7. I finally saw a gastroenterologist today after waiting for almost 5 months and it was definitely not worth the wait. The doctor said that he finds "young women tend to bloat as the day goes on" and this was probably my problem, that and my diabetes. Never mind the nausea, cramping, diarrhea, extreme fatigue, rash, etc. I just need some metamucil and I'll be fine. No further investigation necessary. My chance of having celiac is "1 in 10000" according to him since I had negative bloodwork (no total IgA done though) and I would have known if I had celiac when I was a child. I know that doctors are often uneducated but I wasn't expecting it to be this bad. Now that I know I'm not having any testing done I'm just going to go ahead and try the gluten-free diet but it would have been nice to have some support from a doctor. He actually wrote on a script and gave it to me, "Not celiac. Suspect related to the diabetes. Suspect the bloating of young women. Put on treatment - psyllium husks". Thanks for listening to me vent and if anyone can suggest a decent gastroenterologist in London, Ontario that would be great.
  8. I was just wondering how long people usually have to wait to have a biopsy done after their initial appointment with a gastroenterologist? I've waited 4 months to see the gastro and am curious about how much I might have to wait to get a possible diagnosis (or at least be able to start a gluten-free trial). Thanks.
  9. I broke out into a bad rash last summer that strongly fits the description of DH. I was referred to a dermatologist but by the time the biopsy was done the results only showed scar tissue. I did an iodine patch test and had a really strong reaction. I couldn't keep the band-aid on for more than an hour because the itching and burning was so bad. My boyfriend had no reaction at all. I was just wondering if there are any other causes for a positive iodine patch test? I don't want to make such a drastic lifestyle change if there could be another reason for the rash and would like to try other remedies first if possible. I'm also waiting to see a gastroenterologist to have a biopsy done for celiac so I don't want to go gluten free until that's over. Is there anything I can do to reduce the itching until then? Thanks for any advice.
  10. I'm currently waiting to see a gastroenterologist (first appointment on March 4) but had a question about the TTG test. I was tested in June of last year because I have Type 1 diabetes and hypothyroidism so it was more of a screening process than anything else, no obvious symptoms at this time. My TTG IgA level was 0.2, reference range 0-10. I was retested in October because I had been having symptoms for almost two months that were indicative of celiac disease. My TTG IgA was 2.2 at that point, still normal according to the lab. The lab did not run any other celiac-related tests and I chose not to pursue further bloodwork since it isn't covered by OHIP in Ontario and I'm going to see a gastro anyway. My question is, does it mean something that my levels jumped between the first and second tests? I know the numbers are still normal but I think it is odd that my antibodies would go from almost zero to 2.2 at the same time that I start getting symptoms. I'm more curious than anything else since I need to continue eating gluten anyway in case my gastro wants to do a biopsy. Thanks for your opinions.