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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


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About Skylark

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  1. The home tests are better for finding celiac than for ruling it out. TTG tests are 80% accurate. There is still a 20% chance that you are celiac so no, you shouldn't assume you are intolerant.
  2. Your kids' response to the diet means a LOT more than fecal IgA. It's not a terribly reliable test, though a result of 144 is certainly interesting. Little kids don't always have a strong immune response so the older's test results might simply be a reflection of his/her more mature immune system. As other folks have said, you can't have them tested for celiac once they're off gluten. If your insurance won't cover celiac panels and it's beyond your means, you might consider getting a home TTG test kit and at least testing the older who has a lot of fecal antibodies. I hope going off gluten helps their stomach-aches! Obviously follow your naturopath's advice as far as tapering and how long to try the diet once you've done whatever celiac testing you feel is appropriate.
  3. My Family Can't Eat Gluten Free

    It has happened to other board members so don't give up hope. Just get well and set the best example you can.
  4. As I said above, "not detectable" assumes the test for gluten works reliably on soy sauce. It doesn't. Eat at your own risk.
  5. My Family Can't Eat Gluten Free

    Sorry to hear that. It must be frustrating, especially the reacting. Maybe this will be easier to take on when you are feeling better. Has your doctor spoken to your husband? Maybe he'll believe better if he hears it first-hand?
  6. Oh gosh, that sounds terrible! Most of the celiac tests look for autoimmunity so it seems to me that your immune suppressants might mask celiac disease. Celiac can really mess with calcium absorption and cause osteoporosis. It's also a risk factor for duodenal tumors so to my way of thinking it sort of all fits together. Gluten intolerance is also pretty common and it can cause a lot of inflammation and stomach trouble with negative celiac tests so that could be your issue too. I'm glad your doctors had the sense to try you on the diet and that it's helping.
  7. Welcome to the board! tTG IgA is a test for a kind of autoimmunity that's almost always caused by celiac and yours is quite high. Be sure to give the gluten-free diet a good strict try no matter what the endoscopy results are. Sometimes the celiac damage gets missed because it can be patchy. If you've had a lot of stomach trouble you should feel loads better!
  8. Some naturally fermented soy sauce gets broken down by the cultures to where the gluten is below detection limits. Problem is, the tests don't work right on broken-down gluten so you can't really know whether the soy sauce is safe. Since the laws don't take the subtleties of gluten testing into account they can be legally labeled gluten-free. I personally wouldn't eat them.
  9. My Family Can't Eat Gluten Free

    It took my mom a few years to watch me get well and then take the plunge herself. She denied feeling better on the diet for a good six months but got sick every single time she ate wheat and finally accepted that she needed to be gluten-free. By the way, if you are talking about minor children, I think you need to put your foot down and get them tested for celiac, by blood and genetics. They're at high risk if your 4 genes are double-DQ2.5.
  10. In this study the challenge was with wheat, not pure gluten, so using the phrase "gluten sensitivity" would be incorrect. Top-level researchers use very precise language to try to describe exactly what they observe, not what they might assume.
  11. I went to a 100% gluten-free restaurant in Asheville. It took me about ten minutes to decide what to order because I'm so used to not having any choices. Food was excellent and the restaurant was plenty busy. They're using local, sustainable food too so they appeal to a wider market than just celiac/gluten-free. They bake all their own breads, muffins, and bagels too.
  12. Yeah, the jury is still out. I had a really strong response to eggs on an IgG test so I have to eliminate/challenge to be sure. Thing is, I tend to feel really awful on Monday and I usually make omelets or bake on the weekends. I also came up positive for soy on the IgG test and I know soy doesn't agree with me. Dairy came back negative so I'm praying I've been mistaking egg reactions for dairy and I'll have dairy back. I'd happily trade eggs for dairy! Thanks for the help! I'll try the chia/buckwheat/coconut milk in a few days when I get a chance to shop for them. That sounds better than the methylcellulose in the Ener-G stuff. I really prefer cooking from whole foods. Beans for breakfast isn't a bad idea, though that's usually what I have for lunch. I'm also eyeing my jar of peanut butter.
  13. Thanks! I can do guar gum, psyllium, and chia. I forgot you can sub chia for eggs. I'm going to play with flax too. Cow dairy is iffy, sometimes I react sometimes not. I seem to be back to tolerating goats milk so might be able to find goat sour cream. I can do enough starch to try the Ener-G egg replacer. I might give that a go in my regular almond meal recipe. Amaranth or buckwheat taste great and that recipe looks tasty but it's still kind of a heavy carb load for me in the morning. If I eat too much starch at breakfast I'm pooped and starving by lunch. Maybe if I just have one with some sausage... This no-egg trial is a pain. Fooey.
  14. There is no such research. It's an urban legend that has cropped up on the internet recently. I have looked up all the supposed scientific references and they say that coffee allergies and reactions are actually quite rare. Coffee is a bit of a GI irritant and it's hard on folks with stomach trouble. It was probably too much for your system to handle. I used to be told to give up coffee because I had "gastritis". Pity my doctors never told me to give up gluten.
  15. In Nature! Sweet! That's an impressive study too.