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About julandjo

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  1. So my older kids are now 7 and 9. They were both completely intolerant of gluten as babies, which prompted me to get tested myself. I am a diagnosed Celiac since 2010. Since even cross-contamination caused my kids immediate reactions when they were younger, they've never been on a "trial". One idiot GI doctor had my son eat gluten for 2 weeks, then did an endoscopy and (surprise!) found no evidence of Celiac. That was 5 years ago. We maintain a gluten free household, they take their own safe food everywhere they go, etc. On the rare occasions when I know they've been cross-contaminated (they haven't had a direct exposure in a few years), it wasn't much of a blip on their body's radar, if anything. Lately I've been feeling like we should trial them on gluten, for the sake of simplicity at school, around their friends, scout campouts, etc. If they don't have to live gluten-free, it'd be easier obviously. My husband is leery of the idea, thinking it'll cause unnecessary pain. I see both sides. My question is this: for people who have been living 100% gluten free for years, will the introduction of gluten cause physical symptoms, even in the absence of gluten sensitivity? I've read anecdotal things about people who do not have a gluten problem, reintroducing gluten, and having a period of discomfort, etc. while their body readjusts. Thoughts, suggestions?
  2. I went through my first two pregnancies undiagnosed too. I needed fertility tx to conceive. Both of my babies were born 5 weeks early in emergency c-sections due to pre-eclampsia, and I stayed sick for a long time after each birth. Both kids had intrauterine growth restriction and spent weeks in the NICU to catch up. So I got my tubes tied after the second pregnancy when the dr. said getting pregnant again would be life-threatening. Two weeks after the tubal ligation I found out I had Celiac... Fast forward 3 years. Aside from the occasional unintentional glutening at a restaurant (about once a year), I've been 100% gluten free. As a result I've lost 70 pounds. My high bp is gone. My cycles are finally regular. I no longer have DH rashes, neuropathy, anxiety attacks, etc. Five days ago I found out I'M PREGNANT. DESPITE my tubal ligation and previous infertility. (Note: this is extremely happy news - we've been trying to adopt for 18 months without luck. And I'm absolutely convinced that now that I'm not poisoning myself like my first 2 pregnancies, this one will be a healthy one.) I'm having a lot of food aversions, which is pretty difficult for me as I only have eleven safe foods. But never once would I even consider eating gluten. Just knowing not only how sick it made me, but how sick it made my babies, makes it about as appealing to me as a spoonful of cyanide. I'm not trying to lay a guilt trip on you. But you need to understand just how counterproductive eating gluten is to you. Do whatever it takes to keep it out of your house. You're #1 right now and the family is just going to have to deal with it to keep mom healthy!
  3. Thank you all so much!! I'm going to get that burlap bag of basmati next time I'm there, yeehaw! I was thinking that stuff grown outside the US would be less likely to have gluten used as a cover crop - good to know I'm not alone in that thinking. T.H., neither I nor my naturopath think it's a fructose issue - I'm able to eat apples and drink apple juice all day long with no trouble. We'll get to the bottom of this somehow!
  4. So I've recently been able to add RICE to my diet!!! This is HUGE - I've been on the same 8 safe foods for over a year and am extremely sensitive to any CC. I do very well with white rice, but brown rice caused GI distress. Anyway, I've been eating Lundberg, which is great, but the price hurts. Costco sells 25-lb bags of different kinds of rices at fantastic prices, most of which are grown outside the U.S. Any super-sensitives have experience with other safe brands? Also, they did have one brand of "parboiled golden rice" that specifically said gluten free. But #1 what is parboiled, and #2 would this technically be a brown rice or a white rice? ETA: here's what it is: It sounds like something I should avoid... the bran layer is part of what makes brown rice harder to digest, no?
  5. We had to switch our dogs and cat over to grain-free food too. Not only was CC an issue, but my young kids love to hand-feed the dogs their kibble sometimes. It was making them very, very sick. We use Pure Vita Grain Free diets. Our pets eat WAY less and look and feel so much better!
  6. That's cute. My 5-year old son is so protective of his 3-year old sister. They were going through their candy and DD kept trying to stuff things in her mouth. He would grab her hand and say "wait", then she'd look at him all concerned and ask "does dis have glootnin in it?". They both understand the importance of it so there was no upset over having to forfeit a bunch of candy.
  7. Sweet potatoes - 40lbs at a time gluten-free, nut-free sunflower seeds Pamela's choc. chip cookies (I used them to make pie crusts) tapioca flour I too love Amazon's subscribe and save! It saves a ton of money!
  8. Do you think? This would be perfect for us, but how can I find out for sure if this will work? His GI doctor has been zero help - he insisted on testing my son for Celiac several months ago despite the fact that he was gluten-free. When the tests OBVIOUSLY came back negative, he assured me that DS does not have Celiac and that I should feed him anything. I reminded the nurse on the phone that of course it was negative due to his diet, she got snippy and told me that if he was truly a Celiac, there would have been "Celiac cells" evident on the biopsy. You can't reason with stupid.
  9. Oh, he totally understands why we ask him to eat those particular snacks in his room. From the time he could talk he has asked people if the food they're offering has gluten in it, and he's a total watchdog for everything his sister eats. He's very conscious of my and his sister's need to be gluten-free, and it's a treat for him to get to snack alone. Sometimes I'll turn on their favorite cartoon and let him snack while watching that because then his sister is too entranced by the TV to notice they're not eating the same thing, ha! We've been very careful in how we're approaching the emotional aspect of this. We're not doing equivalent snacks for the other child because this isn't the type of food we want either of them to think is normal or healthy as a daily snack. Snacks here are usually fresh fruit or veggies, popcorn, cheese, etc. These gluten snacks are all processed crud and bread. It's not at all how I want him to eat, but I can't have gluten being cooked in my house so I'm sort of stuck feeding him this. I do worry how it's going to seem in his mind when we take this stuff back out of his diet though... I don't want him to have an unhealthy relationship with food, you know?
  10. Ick. I'm still getting over my fall sickness (18 days! 18 days of this, for the love!). It seems like it takes forever to get over stuff that other people kick out fairly quickly. I've never been able to take any of the cold medicines; I get crazy heart palpitations, dizziness, red face/chest, poundy head, etc. All I can do is tylenol/ibuprofen. I just make sure I pamper myself when I'm sick - I scale back or stop my workouts, eat plenty of healthy food, drink lots of water, get extra sleep. And keep taking my supplements. Hang in there!
  11. I've tried this, but getting this kid to eat is like pulling teeth. We eat dinner as a family every night, and my husband and I are ready to pull our hair out with the constant "eat", "stop fighting with your sister and EAT", and finally "you either eat NOW or you go to bed NOW". This kid is all muscle and bone and could care less about food! Since all our meals are gluten-free, he has to eat his gluten as snacks. Fat chance of getting him to sit in one place for that; he'd rather not eat! Since my 3 yr-old daughter still reacts to gluten (and is hurt when he gets crackers/cookies that she can't share) we try to get him to eat his snacks in his room, but invariably he wanders out for something or other, or is playing with shared toys while he snacks, etc... I think we just have to ride this one out and do our best to limit CC. I just wish it didn't have to go on for so long!
  12. Some background info: my kids have both had multiple food intolerances since birth. Gluten has always been the worst offender; even when they were strictly breastfed they reacted to it in my milk, so after their initial exposure and reaction, they've lived gluten-free. Once I was dx'd w/Celiac, I made the house gluten free because I'm very very sensitive. In the past 6 months, my son seems to have outgrown almost all of his food intolerances, so we decided to put him on a gluten trial. He's 4 weeks into it and seems to be doing fine. He's eating the gluten-laden breakfasts and lunches at daycare (holy horrible nutrition!), but since he's only there 3 days a week we're loading him up at home too. We're doing this so that we can get him tested. Regardless of the results, once this trial is over we'll be going back to a gluten-free home and he'll be eating what I cook and send to daycare (also gluten-free obviously). We just want to know if he's + or - so we know how to approach parties, sleepovers, etc. The problem? I'm getting CC'd like crazy! He just turned 5, so as you can imagine he's tracking crumbs all over, touching drawer handles, fridge/doorknobs, giving me sloppy kisses, etc. I'm being as careful as I can and washing my hands before I eat anything, but somehow I'm still miserable. (Don't worry; I'm not using any of my cookware, etc.; all his gluten food is prepackaged). Given that he's lived 5 years 100% gluten-free, how long does this trial need to be to get the best possible blood test results? Thanks in advance!
  13. I'm on month 3 of fighting suspected SIBO. My GI team has me taking Rifaximin (Xifaxan), two weeks on, two weeks off (with probiotics), two weeks on. I feel fantastic while I'm on the antibiotic, and for about a week afterward. But toward the end of the two "off" weeks, I start getting gut trouble, joint pain, etc. My dr. said that for some people, a few months of this therapy will cure the SIBO. But for a lot of people, it's an ongoing problem. Some people can get by with doing this a few times a year; some people need to stay on the cycle. Ughhh... I'm praying I'll be a lucky one and kick this junk. My gut needs to heal so I can get some more foods back into my diet!
  14. Was this a mistake, or are you not 100% gluten-free? If you're truly gluten-free, it sounds like there's something else in your diet getting you. Would you consider going grain-free altogether for a while to see if that improves things?