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plumbago

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About plumbago

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Interests
    Health, mental health, gardening, organic, recycling
  • Location
    Washington, DC
  1. I don't have the soap with me now so I can't check the label. Looking on line - nothing.
  2. RMJ - can you give a link about what you said about the antibodies going down after three weeks? And, which antibodies? Thanks!
  3. My favorite is/was Roger and Gallet, but I think that it might contain gluten (hard to find out). Does anyone have recommendations? Thanks!
  4. As of November 2015, there are three completely gluten-free restaurants in Washington, DC, more depending upon how you count. The Little Beet is a new gluten-free restaurant. 18th and Connecticut Ave NW. Shophouse Kitchen has four locations around the city. It is Southeast Asian cooking. Rise is a gluten-free bakery in the northwest neighborhood of Adams Morgan. They sold soups and heartier fare when they opened in November 2014, but no longer do. I give this bakery a B. I haven't been to either the Little Beet or Shophouse, but am delighted we have these completely gluten-free options in DC. It's a good thing.
  5. Hello, Good catch. I've seen the Celiac genes written the way you wrote but I've also seen them referred to differently (HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1; or HLA DQ2 and HLA DQ8), but I think the way I wrote it was wrong. I don't know enough about genetics to articulate what the difference is in the different way it's referred to, but as I like to say, it's worth more research. (Also, I am now not sure you have to test positive for both genes as I mentioned originally, I think it's just one.) Thanks for bringing that up. It's good to have accuracy in a thread. Plumbago
  6. Just to clarify, I was originally writing about Rudi's. (Just so we're all on the same page.) But I must admit to being surprised that people are buying what I consider to be fairly standard, unspectacular gluten-free bread (Rudis, Udis for example) at such high prices - that Target price is nuts. Unless things have changed in the last week, the most I ever pay for Udis or Rudis is $6, and that's with tax. Looks like they added bamboo for the extra fiber? Are you referring to Rudis? If so, well then I guess it's bamboo. Is that bad? Plumbago
  7. I completely skipped over the wheat allergy. For some people, it is a life-threatening event that is true. (I see she is not scheduled for endoscopy but rather colonoscopy and gastroscopy. Maybe the gastroscopy is what I would normally call an endoscopy. In any case, biopsies should be taken if testing for celiac disease.) Even if I had a wheat allergy, I'd still want to know if I had celiac disease, for sure. I've known people who tested positive for wheat allergy but eventually de-sensitized to it and resumed eating it. But yeah, get the allergy test for wheat.
  8. You certainly have celiac disease symptoms. Yes, you will have to eat gluten every day for 2 weeks before the endoscopy. The link you provided after that discusses the gluten challenge (serology), not how to eat before an endoscopy to check for celiac disease. [EDIT: Just re-read it. It does say to eat gluten 2 weeks prior to an endoscopy] The last sentence recommends moving right to an endoscopy if reaction to gluten is severe. If I were this person, I would consider insisting on bumping up the date of my endoscopy for health reasons. Otherwise, I would be interested in hearing from others - especially medical professionals working on autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease - on this, because my tendency is to think that 3-5 weeks out from an endoscopy, the small intestine would probably not heal in such a short amount of time if the patient is not eating gluten. It sounds like she has some quite serious immediate health issues. While I understand the need to continue consuming gluten before tests, I always thought that was before serology tests and perhaps for the endoscopy it is less crucial to be consuming gluten, again especially if there are some immediate health issues. It is worth more research, that is for sure. Plumbago
  9. Perhaps consider making the house gluten-free for simplicity. I was thinking this myself while reading the post.
  10. Manasota, I am curious to know more about your diagnosis. Were you diagnosed via a bone scan? Did you scrutinize and research your results? Have you thought about a second opinion? As for the first questioner, I don't know the answer, and would need to do at least a couple of hours of research to understand more about osteoporosis caused by celiac disease. It's a great question.
  11. I recently bought this bread for the first time: Rudis gluten free double fiber sandwich bread. I am posting a comment because it stood out from the rest of the gluten-free breads I've purchased in the past. I know there are a few boutique bakeries around the country (let's face it, mainly on the left and right coasts) that bake excellent gluten-free bread. But the day I start shelling out $10 plus for a loaf of bread is the day you know I've won the $26 million lottery. It just ain't gonna happen. But this Rudis bread stood out based not on taste - which was just regular - but on its texture. Honestly I didn't think it was possible to have chewy gluten-free bread. I'm not sure how they did it, but they did! Like most gluten-free breads, you can find it in the frozen food aisle. Not to re-open this can of worms, but like many other gluten-free breads, this particular kind does not fortify with iron or folate, sadly. To recap: taste - regular, normal, nothing special. Texture - very special! Plumbago
  12. Thanks everyone. I did call, but as it turns out "gluten free" was written in the tiniest print on there, which I had completely overlooked. Gelatin is an ingredient, and that was why I was concerned. Plumbago
  13. The link you provided is for steroidal treatment for refractory celiac disease. I thought the context of our discussion was steroid use for asthma and its possible effect on a Celiac panel. For refractory celiac disease, the treatment would be oral (systemic). Steroids for asthma and refractory celiac disease are not delivered by the same route, which can make a difference. One of the rationales for using inhaled corticosteroids is to minimize or even avoid systemic effects. The most commonly listed side effects of inhaled CS are: oral thrush; dysphonia; and hoarse voice. To minimize these effects patients are taught to rinse the mouth. Even better is to use a spacer - there's less chance of systemic infiltration. However, as discussed, it is possible a systemic reaction and side effects can occur. But in general if we are talking about steroid use, the route (as well as dosage and how long it's been used) does matter. Plumbago
  14. Good link. Interesting that it didn't specify type of steroid use. Plumbago
  15. That's a good point. Though the patient is supposed to be on the lowest dose possible of inhaled steroids and although steroid use for asthma is technically a local medication, it's possible for a systemic reaction to occur and definitely worth checking out. Also the association between asthma and celiac disease is supposedly strong, and something you've no doubt thought of by now. Once all this is settled and if your child does end up on the gluten-free diet, it will be interesting to hear what happens with his asthma. And finally not to get too inside baseball, if you do end up going with a small intestine biopsy, it may be worth checking with the medical team to see what his immune status is, as I've read that immunocompromised individuals may need prophylactic antibiotics before invasive procedures. Plumbago