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tpfx

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About tpfx

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  • Birthday October 7

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    Boston area
  1. Thank-you, Rose. I hadn't yet really picked up on the idea that healing is aided by more than just going gluten-free. I'm not one to cook very often, beyond meat in the oven with veggies and a side dish. The veggies and side are usually of the frozen food variety. My freezer had to be emptied entirely, except for meats and fish, and a few rice & vegetable bags. My pantry had to be emptied entirely, except for "meat" (Spam Singles). Almonds, peanuts, cashews...gone, as they're processed in plants with wheat CC. It's time to rebuild not only my food supply, but my body as well. Thanks for the advice.
  2. Hi, I'm new here and to Celic Disease, having just received my diagnosis a week ago. And I'm having a bit of difficulty figuring out the subtleties of ultra-sensitivity versus just regular sensitivity to gluten; and which group I may fall into. Amy's Organic is a prime example. I've found discussions here about the Amy's line, and most point to Amy's as a good gluten-free resource. But then there are those that have discovered that apparent cross-contamination makes Amy's hands-off. At least to them, through experience. I've reacted poorly to Amy's Mexican Casserole myself, hence my interest. I could not find it in the Gluten-Free Mall, which doesn't strike me as a good sign. Somewhere along the line Amy's seems to have changed it's labeling from "gluten-free" to "no gluten ingredients". I'm not familiar with the products from years back, so I don't know if the current statement that the product is "...made in a facility that also processes foods containing wheat...", has always been on the box. But it would seem that the change is an acknowledgement of the CC potential, subsequent to the "gluten-free" days. Does it follow that if I have a bad reaction to an Amy's dish, one that only has "trace" amounts of gluten, that I'm ultra-sensitive to gluten? Or is Amy's alone not going to be a reliable indicator? My apologies if this is a beaten to death topic or more of a question for my GI specialist. I do see that the simplest solution is to avoid Amy's. But what if it's not Amy's and something else? Is everyone stuck using trial and error to discover his or her own unique variation of Celiac? Thank-you!
  3. Hi. Does anyone know if Amy's is still considered a good source for gluten-free frozen dishes? I like(d) the Mexican Casserole and the Enchiladas. But I've tried the Mex. Casserole since eliminating gluten (upon diagnosis), and didn't feel well afterward. The packaging no longer says "gluten-free", but rather "no gluten ingredients". It also states that it's prepared at a facility that processes wheat. So therin lies the answer i guess, but why would Amy's take steps backward regarding gluten? I'd like to know if anyone out there can eat Amy's nowadays, and that maybe I reacted to something else. Thanks!