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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


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About xJalin

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  1. Annoying Friends!

    I would definitely talk to the youth pastor and explain the situation to him, so he knows the seriousness of it, and ask him if he would explain it to the kids there. I know it might be awkward, but if they hear it coming from him, they should acknowledge it and know how serious it is. Especially cross-contamination (what a waste of crackers- those are expensive too!) That's what I did with my youth leader, and he understood and was really nice about it. He told the other kids, and after that they made sure they didn't eat any of the snacks the youth leaders set out for me and were very supportive. Yeah they joked around a little still (though they have never joked around in an unkind way to me) but that was because I joked about it too. I'm sorry the kids in your youth group are rude about it. If they are your friends, you need to let them know you need their support. And don't feel like you need to downplay your condition around them because they'll feel bad if you tell them the truth- if you tell them how you feel they should feel sorry. Don't ever compromise!
  2. Red Heads

    Come to think of it, all the people I know who are celiacs or are of Irish descent. My aunt, myself, and 2 friends (all redheads), and another friend who isn't a redhead but is 100% Irish
  3. Actually, I don't have any serious sleeping problems so I don't think that caused my neurological issues. I just spend many hours trying to fall asleep at nights, but I think that is mostly due to the anxiety feelings I have. Thanks so much for the replies, I really appreciate it! And I will keep you posted
  4. Anyone From Alberta?

    I live 2 hours from Edmonton, but am there a lot. As my little town doesn't have too much selection for gluten-free foods, I usually have to stock up when I'm in Edmonton. I found Winner's is a great place to look for some gluten-free snacks, actually (odd, I know).
  5. Red Heads

    I'm a redhead too. Interestingly enough, my brother's friend is a celiac, and he's a redhead too.
  6. I'm new to the forum so hopefully this is in the right place! I'm 18 years old and have not been tested for celiac yet, but I believe, taking account of the symptoms I have, that I am celiac. My older sister (foster sister) thought she had celiac, so she started the gluten-free diet. She didn't follow through with the diet, but she and my mother learned a lot about it. When I was 7, I became a stutterer. I had no emotional trauma to trigger it. My parents did stutter when they were younger, but only when they were nervous. My stuttering got worse, and worse, and worse throughout the years (depression joined in too), and today it takes great effort to speak a single word. Lately, I have had a lot of "brain fog" which tends to complicate my stuttering issues even more (being unsure of what I'm saying). I have also had stomach troubles all my life- constipation, acid reflux, gas- and one night eating out at a restaurant 3 years ago, I had an awful stomach spasm- searing pain that comes and goes as if someone is stabbing you repeatedly in the stomach. It happened quite a few times after that, mostly when I ate out at restaurants (and unfortunately, mostly when it was a friends birthday party Way to take the attention off them, lol). At the time, I blamed all my stomach troubles on my lactose intolerance, and blamed the fettuccine alfredo sauce instead of the noodles. But now, I believe it may be otherwise. My mom made the possible connection between my neurological problems and gluten, and mentioned that my sleeping difficulties, stomach problems, and stuttering all started when I was 7. My questions are, do these sound related? Also, how long would it take to see results if I went completely gluten-free? My mom is really good at making sure there are no traces of gluten in the food I eat, and looking for hidden traces. I doubt that going gluten-free would cure my stutter completely, but is there a possibility that it would help?