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About fallcity

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  1. I am 64 years old. My symptoms started at age 57. At first they were vague: constipation, mild headaches in the mornings that would disappear after eating, mild nausea in the mornings that would disappear after moving around a bit. That went on for about two years and I went through several celiac test was negative, as were other tests. Then in year three my symptoms grew worse. I was so constipated that I lived on laxatives and I began to have pain in my lower abdomen and right leg. I was so exhausted that I would sit in my car for 30 minutes or so before I had the energy to drive home, then sit in my car for another 30 minutes before I could walk into the house. I lost weight and truly thought I was dying. My gastroenterologist suggested an elimination diet, which I started immediately. I ate only fresh foods for four weeks and felt terrific. I then began to add back food, one at a time and learned immediately that I was sensitive to gluten, so I stayed off it. I was 80% better, so I continued to piece together the puzzle. I learned I am also sensitive to soy, dairy, wine, non gluten free beer and most coffee. It has taken me three years to heal my gut, but I am often glutened if I eat out, so I try to always prepare my own food. In the US, we do not hold food manufactures accountable. The only group I can think of that is feeling the ingredient pressure is the cereal industry. In Europe, they don't use the same cheap ingredients as we do in processed foods, like soy flour, corn flour, guar gum and modified cellulose. Here's an example: The Schar Company is a German manufacture of gluten free crackers and pastas. Recently, their US division, not their German division, changed their recipe for table crackers, adding soy flour, which is a cheap alternative to other gluten free flours. The result is that many of their customers will not be able to eat this product. However, the cost savings must be greater that the impact to their customers who are both gluten and soy sensitive, which is a common combination.
  2. Schar table crackers now have a new recipe. For those of you who, like me, are sensitive to both gluten and soy, the new crackers now include soy flour. Please read the ingredients. I got really sick. This is really sad and just an attempt to make cheaper crackers.