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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


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About FoodisLife12

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    New Community Member
  • Birthday August 10

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  • Gender Male
  • Interests Helping those with Chronic Conditions gain the confidence to enjoy meals away from home.
  1. By limited choices i meant that restaurants don't have a lot of gluten free food to offer. Sorry if it was convoluted. Restaurants are starting to have req'd training in gluten allergies, which is smart because 21 million people accounts for significant missed profit opportunities. Their loss. Anyway, I completely agree with the fact that restaurants need to be more conscious of food allergens. 150 million people in the U.S. have some form of chronic illness that will restrict their diet.
  2. I know exactly what you mean, I grew up with four older sisters, my mom, cousins, now my nieces. Me and Dad had to everything we could everyday to make the girls happy. Its only proper....(and its so you dont get in trouble)
  3. I work for a nutrition insights company called FoodCalc. We sit at the cross section of nutrition insight and the healthcare industry. We are currently looking for people to take a short survey so that we can further advance our goal of improving the lives of over 150 million Americans who suffer from some form of Chronic Illness and who currently have dietary restrictions. Our goal is to help you enjoy the foods you love without worrying about the consequences.

  4. I feel like the main fear is CC of restaurants who just don't have the full understanding of how large the market is of people suffering from some form of a dietary restriction.
  5. All of this recipe talk is making me hungry..... I am very new to this forum, as you can probably all tell, and I am a non celiac who is looking for help for friends and searching all possible answers to a family members health problems. Does this condition severely affect dining habits? I feel as though there is not sufficient enough information in the market to allow people suffering from a diet restricting condition to eat with confidence. All of the posts I have visited so far gave me the impression that eating at home where your food can be monitored better is the suggested route. I personally have a form of GERD that restricts what I eat but I can still enjoy eating out as long as I watch what I eat. However, with Celiac, I feel like it is a riskier situation because your health is in the hands of chefs who may or may not be worrying about CC. Is the main concern with eating out fewer options or concerns about the kitchen? I am trying to warn a family member with possible issues and a friends sister with an intolerance. I will point my friends sister to this forum for support if it becomes any worse.
  6. That article doesn't deserve consideration. Anyone with the slightest familiarity of Celiac's can see how uninformed these people are. Low and behold, IGNORANCE still seems to be the most common disease in this country...
  7. I Couldn't agree more!
  8. Since you seem to be a person of faith, as mentioned here a few times, I will respond with something I learned in my faith that has helped me in all aspects of my life, but I want to preface this by saying im not trying to force my faith on anyone. When I come across a situation like this I have to remind myself that although people say I am the one with the "impairment", it is only a physical problem that in the grand scheme of things, should not hinder others views of us. However, this is a naive way to live because someone somewhere will always have a problem with it because they don't understand. So, my advice would be to stand up for yourself and show your family unconditional love. Keep your food separate from theirs and if you cook family meals, use separate pots/pans/utensils. Cook your food last so that you can take the time to protect yourself. No matter how much they try to push you around on the subject, show them that the obstacles can be overcome and you still care regardless. After a while, they will catch on. No one likes change, because change signifies having to adapt, and no one wants to leave their comfort zone.
  9. On another note, does your family's fear about gluten affect your habits when dining out? Do you even get to go out? Or have you adapted your lifestyle to accommodate the rest of your loved ones? If so, the possibility still exists for all of you to enjoy eating out a restaurant every once in a while. Most places, reputable ones anyway, will accommodate any food allergy/dietary restrictions.
  10. I Am So Excited!

    If only there were places like this. The fact that the chef was kind enough to respond and with such news is exciting. I found a place in Kentucky that offers a similar prospect. I asked about the possibility of a condition friendly dish and they brought the chef out who offered to make any dish I desired, on the menu or not, and using whichever ingredients I wanted. They were more than happy to oblige by the clean utensils policy as well and offered many assurances. Now to test them and see if its too good to be true or not.
  11. How Often Do You Eat Out?

    In my experience the restaurants post a gluten/allergy nutrition page on the company website. Although this doesn't really make me trust the reliability of each individual franchise, it at least gives some semblance of concern on behalf of the restaurant. That being said, if they mess up and serve a "gluten-free" meal and it is contaminated, all the guarantees and published information is little consolation. How confident can you actually be in claims made by restaurants with little supervision in the kitchen?
  12. Can gluten-free Pizza Be Trusted?

    So there really can't be any information trusted? What I understand is that even if a restaurant says that they are gluten free, its always better to take the necessary precautions anyway? This is a practice that I can see as the best way to go about eating right. What I don't understand is what legally allows these establishments to claim a gluten conscious environment when they cannot necessarily control what goes on behind the scenes. Are there any people to regulate this? Monthly inspections? Company policies to protect the customers?
  13. I found out over the weekend that one of my best friend's sister is plagued with a form of Celiac's disease. I am not sure if it is full blown celiac's or just an intolerance but when she comes into contact with any wheat or gluten she breaks out in hives and is currently on some form of topical cream that, from what i understand, can be very harmful if applied to any area of the body with a thinner epidermal layer. That being said, I am the type of person who always wants to help a friend in need and I am highly interested in the food industry myself. I love to cook and adding new dishes to my repertoire is always a good thing, especially when those around you are affected by dietary restrictions. I would like to point her in the direction of this website but I dont want to seem too pushy about trying to help. Just giving friendly and concerned advice every now and then when she is less than confident about her eating decisions would work for now. Unfortunately, I still need to educate myself on the subject so I came here to learn from the people who live with this condition everyday in the hopes of getting the true story. If there is anything you all can offer that will help my friend out I would greatly appreciate it and if I discover any information that might help I will return the favor.