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NJKen

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  1. I recommend that you consider staying in vacation apartments, at least in a few locations. That way you can prepare your own meals (and save a bit on the overall cost of your trip). Many Reformhaus shops carry gluten-free foods. ("Gluten-free" in German is "Glutenfrei"; easy to recognize.) A Reformhaus is a combination drug store and health food shop; the amount of shelf space given to food products varies from store to store but some have very extensive gluten-free products. The Reformhaus in the underground shopping center beneath the Zurich train station has a good selection, and you can make a quick stop there between trains. (You can search for a Reformhaus in any town or city that you are going to stay in on Google Maps.) If you are in a town with a Spar grocery store, they have a "Free From" line of foods that includes some gluten-free products. (The brand name "Free From" is in English.) Wasa crispbreads are available in Europe in a gluten-free variety (but why, oh why, not in the US?). Most food products in European grocery stores and Reformhauses list the ingredients in several languages, often including English. Among restaurants, I can recommend from experience Ristorante il Salento in Munich and Tibits Bistro in Winterthur (also in Zurich, Bern, Basel, and Lucerne). I've also eaten at Nordsee restaurants (a seafood cafeteria chain), but cross-contamination may be more of an issue here if you don't select carefully; I stick to the salmon or the pre-prepared dishes like paella.
  2. During a recent vacation in northern Italy during which my wife and I stayed mostly in vacation apartments, we spent the last 3 nights in Verona. We were able to buy a few gluten-free items in the Spar market in the old town (a couple of blocks west of Piazza Bra' and the Arena) and in the PAM market, a block or so south of the old city wall. On our last afternoon, though, we found the mother lode of gluten-free food--Farmacia Internazionale, located at Piazza Bra' 28, telephone 045/59.61.39. The pharmacy is just inside the main entrance through the wall to the piazza, on the left as you are heading north with the Arena ahead of you. There are some gluten-free items displayed in the front window, and then as you enter the small room you will not find anything gluten-free. Get onto the elevator, go up one floor, and you will enter a room filled with food items--a few are for diabetics, but the great majority is gluten-free food from various brands. I highly recommend that you visit this if you are planning to cook your own food, or just want a variety of cookies and crackers, while you are staying in Verona. We did not attempt to eat out in Verona, so I cannot comment on the restaurants.
  3. Yes, there are Reformhauses all over Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Those that carry food are a good source for gluten-free items, but some of them only have natural pharmaceuticals and cosmetics.
  4. I haven't gone into a Chinese restaurant other than PF Chang's in years, but when I did I ordered vegetables with white sauce, which is made with corn starch.
  5. I had dinner with my wife and mother-in-law this weekend at the Greenhouse Cafe. I ordered the gluten-free crab cakes and enjoyed them very much. They came with a salad and potato, and the server also brought me some rice crackers since I couldn't eat the bread that was brought for my dinner companions. My wife, who is not on a gluten-free diet, ordered the gluten-free spinach pizza so that I could eat some of it. I had a slice at dinner--it was very good, and I had two leftover slices the next day for lunch. My MIL had the Manhattan clam chowder, which I didn't try, but I could have--it is also gluten-free. We would definitely go back again for a meal--and they serve gluten-free breakfasts, too! We did not go to the Plantation Restaurant, but I had checked online, and the gluten-free dinner options are clearly indicated on the menu. Boulevard Clams in Surf City is currently advertising gluten-free crab cakes on the billboard out front.
  6. FYI--I had the wrong district of Prague when I first posted. It is in Praha 8, not Praha 3.
  7. I am cross-posting this excerpt from the Travel board so that anyone looking for a gluten-free meal in Prague will see this: We celebrated our 20th wedding anniversary with a week in Prague, and regarding food, the best part of our visit was our meals at a restaurant that we learned about only a few weeks before going. Na Zlate Krizovatce serves Czech and international specialties, and is entirely gluten-free. It is located on Za Poricskou branou in Praha 8, about a block from the Florenc metro stop, and just a few blocks from Obecni dum in the old town. Their website is www.nazlatekrizovatce.cz . We had beef goulash with potato pancakes(me) and salmon with dried tomato salsa (my wife) and a dessert of apple strudel on our first visit, and then returned three days later on our anniversary and had chicken with cream sauce and homemade spaetzle (me) and homemade gnocchi with gorgonzola cream (my wife) and a dessert of cinnamon pancakes with warmed-up berries ("forest fruits") and sour cream. Everything was delicious, including the bottle of Bohemian Sekt that we finished on our anniversary evening. The more expensive of the two evenings cost us just 1000 crowns including the tip, about $53 at the current rate of exchange. The restaurant is below street level on a quiet block and has a nice atmosphere. Our first visit was on a day that we hadn't had lunch and arrived at 3:30; no one else was there throughout our dinner. Our second visit began just a little later in the day (perhaps 4:00), and five other tables had diners by the time we left. Service was good--not overly attentive, but there when we needed it, and of course no smiles; that wouldn't be Czech. I highly recommend this restaurant to anyone on this board who is visiting Prague, or will be within 100 km of Prague.
  8. My wife and I spent a week in Prague this month to celebrate our anniversary. Uncertain how easily we would find gluten-free foods in the grocery stores (we had rented an apartment), we brought a large amount of gluten-free food with us from the US. We needn't have bothered. Our rented apartment was in Praha 2, just off Belehradska. The Billa grocery store just around the corner from us on Belehradska had a display full of gluten-free breads, pastas, cookies, etc. There appeared to be no breakfast cereal, but we later decided that the chocolate-flavored amaranth "Viky" that we bought was intended to be cereal, not cookies. Also on Belehradsa (address Belehradska 87), closer to the National Museum, was a Diana International Food bakery that had fresh-baked gluten-free desserts in addition to gluten-free packaged foods. I believe that the fresh-baked goods are brought in from somewhere else in Prague; this location also sells non-gluten-free foods. There are several branches of the Diana bakery in Prague, but we only visited this one, about three blocks south of the museum. Several other grocery stores that we stopped in had some gluten-free products. The best part of our visit (in terms of food) was our meals at a restaurant that we learned about only a few weeks before going. Na Zlate Krizovatce serves Czech and international specialties, and is entirely gluten-free. It is located on Za Poricskou branou in Praha 8, about a block from the Florenc metro stop, and just a few blocks from Obecni dum in the old town. Their website is www.nazlatekrizovatce.cz . We had beef goulash with potato pancakes (me) and salmon with dried tomato salsa (my wife) and a dessert of apple strudel on our first visit, and then returned three days later on our wedding anniversary and had chicken with cream sauce and homemade spaetzle (me) and homemade gnocchi with gorgonzola cream (my wife) and a dessert of cinnamon pancakes with warmed-up berries ("forest fruits") and sour cream. Everything was delicious, including the bottle of Bohemian Sekt that we finished on our anniversary evening. The more expensive of the two evenings cost us just 1000 crowns including the tip, about $53 at the current rate of exchange. The restaurant is below street level on a quiet block and has a nice atmosphere. Our first visit was on a day that we hadn't had lunch and arrived at 3:30; no one else was there throughout our dinner. Our second visit began just a little later in the day (perhaps 4:00), and five other tables had diners by the time we left. Service was good--not overly attentive, but there when we needed it, and of course no smiles; that wouldn't be Czech. I highly recommend this restaurant to anyone on this board who is visiting Prague, or will be within 100 km of Prague. We did not get to the Country Life Restaurant in the center of the city that apparently has gluten-free menu items. We did eat one meal at the Nordsee on Na Prikope near the Estates Theatre and Wenceslaus Square. Nordsee is a seafood buffet restaurant chain with many branches in Germany and Austria; most of the fish is breaded, but not the salmon. The cc risk may be too great for some, though I believe that ordering something like the pre-made paella would reduce the risk. Be aware that the side dishes cost extra, so our buffet meal at Nordsee cost not much less than the upscale dinner at Na Zlate Krizovatce. We had a wonderful time in Prague celebrating 20 years together. I hope that this information is helpful to others considering a visit.
  9. I just wanted to make a minor correction to this informative post: Wheat is "weizen" (pronounced vite-sen). Flour is "mehl" (pronounced "Mel"). ("Weisen" translates to "point". "Weiss" translates to "white", and wheat beer is sometimes called "Weissbier" instead of "Weizenbier", hence the confusion.) (Edited on 3 February to correct the pronunciation of "mehl".)
  10. You can buy gluten-free foods to prepare in your kitchen (if you have one) and cookies/crackers to snack on at most Reformhaus stores. Reformhaus carries "health foods" and "natural products". You can look up the locations of Reformhauses to see if you'll be near any at this website: http://www.reformhaus.de/filialfinder.html
  11. You can buy gluten-free foods at almost any Reformhaus. You may also be able to find gluten-free foods in the grocery stores; gluten-free in German is Glutenfrei. I once had an enjoyable gluten-free pizza at Ristorante il Salento, a few blocks north of the main train station in Munich: http://www.ristorante-il-salento.de/ Several times I have enjoyed gluten-free baked goods at Fritz M
  12. Check out the restaurants listed on the Gluten Free Philly website. Also, I recently wrote to Varalli, an Italian restaurant on Broad Street near the theaters, and received the following reply: We can accommodate your special diet. Just inform us of your dietary restriction when making your reservation. We hope to see you soon.
  13. There have been numerous discussions on this board about various restaurants in New York--most of them have gotten positive reviews. I have enjoyed meals at: Sambuca Lumi Nizza Nice Matin Candle 79 Lili's 57 Risotteria Friedmann's Lunch A good source of recommendations (especially for NYC) is: www.glutenfreerestaurants.org
  14. I haven't been there in a few years, but I recall that there is a sushi restaurant in the food court. If you bring your own (wheat-free) soy sauce, you should be able to find something there that is relatively safe to eat.
  15. Pure wheat starch is inherently gluten-free, but there is a risk of cross-contamination during its extraction. I believe that in Europe, some wheat starch is produced with the intent of using it in gluten-free products, and this wheat starch is tested for gluten content. Many cakes and cookies labeled as gluten-free in Europe include wheat starch as an ingredient. There must be many people on the gluten-free diet in Europe who consume these (and when I visit Europe, I am among them), but you'll need to decide for yourself whether you feel safe.