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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


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About helenln0

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  1. I am 30 years old and have had issues with chronic constipation for 6+ years.  Doctors diagnosed with IBS and treated with Amitiza.  A new doctor suggested I be tested for Celiac with a family history of Lupus, RA, and Celiac Disease.  Bloodwork came back borderline and endoscopy confirmed diagnosis.  I was diagnosed just before Christmas and have been gluten free (to the best of my knowledge) since Jan 1, so I'm really only about 2 months in.   Anyway, starting in November/December, I began getting red, itchy patches on my hands and wrists.  I blew it off to being winter and dry so bought some soothing lotion and all was well.  Went to my parents for a week at Christmas and the rash that resembles hives grew - I had it on my arms, feet, and ankles.  Returning home in January, I went completely gluten-free and the hives took over -- hands, arms, neck, feet, legs, some on my abdomen, but not so much.  I always have some, but the spots I have today will be gone tomorrow and new ones will pop up in new places.  I have been to the regular doc twice and dermatologist three times and all they can tell me is it's chronic urticaria (hives) and they've jacked up my antihistamines to the point of being in a cloud all day.  They obviously aren't working, I still look like a leopard and itch terribly.  At one point, I was prescribed a 20-day course of steroids that did the trick for about 10 days and I felt like a new woman, but it's been a few weeks now and the hives are back full-force.   I don't think the hives resemble DH and the doctors don't seem too concerned about it, though they have mentioned it.  They also are not concerned about Lupus or other chronic diseases at this time.  I've had some bloodwork and my sed rate was slightly elevated but everything with my CBC with differential was completely normal.  What are we missing?  Where should I turn next?  What should I suggest to the doctor?  I really have no idea what's going on and as a full time PhD student, I just don't have time for this :-)     Is this common for celiac disease?  If it is DH and I've been gluten free, shouldn't it be getting better rather than worse?     Any help is greatly appreciated!  The sooner I can stop the overload of antihistamines (that aren't working), the better!   Thank you.