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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


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About kbtoyssni

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  • Birthday 01/27/1982

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  1. You could try using creamed corn instead of cheese on tacos. It gives that additional texture and flavor you're missing when you don't use cheese. I've been doing this for a few years now as I've worked to cut down on the amount of dairy I consume, and it's delicious.
  2. Social Situations

    My company does a big lunch for everyone for Thanksgiving and Christmas. I am normally completely open and happy to talk about my celiac, but I HATE these lunches. I always have to sit with people I didn't know well because everyone comes down to the cafeteria that day, and when I say food allergies, I get the question "you're allergic to turkey??" more times than I care to count. So now I treat it as a social hour. I pretend I've already eaten and jump from table to table with a drink in hand socializing and saying hi to everyone. No one asks questions if you're not eating because they assume you've already finished, but everyone asks questions if you're eating something different.
  3. You could have her search around for a doctor that will diagnose her with celiac or gluten intolerance due to her reaction to eating it. I never had positive blood work, and my doctor (and the few doctors I've had since) was perfectly fine with a diagnosis based on dietary response. I'll admit, I try to find someone younger, someone who may be more up on the current celiac research and open to less traditional methods of diagnosis.
  4. I buy bags of dried beans and cook them myself. It's about 75% cheaper to do it that way.
  5. Crying Over Chicken!

    I always check my take-out orders before I leave the restaurant to make sure they're correct. There's no way I want to risk getting all the way home with the wrong food.
  6. Maybe as he's getting over getting glutened you could send him to school for half days to help him not get behind. When I got mono in high school I would go in for my hard classes and skip the ones that were easier for me to make up on my own. Also, with a 504 plan you could try to work his schedule to have all his harder classes back-to-back so it's easier to go home for the easy classes and study halls. It might be too late for this year, but next year you could try that.
  7. You could keep looking around for a doctor who will write you a diagnosis based on dietary response so you don't have to do a challenge. That's probably safer than purposely feeding the kiddo gluten.
  8. Has Anyone Tried Acupuncture?

    I use acupuncture for my many chronic injuries. I started going because of my arm. I'd been to traditional doctors and had X-rays, MRIs, nerve tests, PT, been to the Mayo Clinic. I could not get answers and was at the point where I was having trouble writing, opening doors, definitely couldn't do many of my sports. I finally decided to try acupuncture as a last resort. After about five sessions, I was nearly better! I've been going again recently when the arm flared up again, and it's also helped my big toe which I did something to back in December and spent two months limping around on it. A few weeks ago I was feeling really tired and had no energy so I had my acupuncturist take care of that, too. If you're just starting out, try googling "community acupuncture". It's generally cheaper with a sliding payment scale. My place maxes out at $40 while traditional acupuncture is more like $65-80 a session. It makes a big difference since it's usually not covered by health insurance. It's absolutely worth a try.
  9. You could request a 504 plan. It's typically used for grade school aged children, but it can be used when you're in college, too. It would give you the legal backing to request gluten-free food or opt out of the meal plan.
  10. Serious Assistance Needed!

    When my company provides lunch for everyone, I'll often expense $5 for the cost of the lunch I had to bring myself. My managers are fine with this arrangement, and I'd prefer to bring my own than trust them to provide a guaranteed gluten-free lunch.
  11. Sometimes I have a gluten free dinner for friends on my anniversary. Sometimes I just make myself a gluten-free cake that I bring to work to share. Congrats on one year!
  12. I always call the place where the reception is being held and ask for a gluten-free meal. Nicer places can usually make you a meal. I don't want the bride and groom to have to worry about contacting the place - I know they're busy dealing with other things. I also ask if the cost of the meal will increase, and I would pay that increase. I've never had that happen but you never know. The one wedding I went to that was buffet-style I brought my own food. I did talk to the caterer, and there was no way they were going to be able to make me a separate meal.
  13. New Apartment

    When I moved into my current place the kitchen and bathroom were disgusting. I vacuumed the kitchen drawers first to get all the crumbs out before wiping them down with my standard kitchen spray cleaner. There's no way I could have gotten all the crumbs out with just a rag and some cleaner there were so many of them. Now that I've scrubbed every surface, no gluten is allowed in the door!
  14. Mexican rice is often made with broth which can have gluten.
  15. Seeing Spots--Brief Flashes Of Light

    Seeing flashes of light and stars can mean a torn retina which is something you should see an eye doc about ASAP. Black specs in your vision is usually usually caused by "floaters", small pieces of things like blood in the eyes. That's normal and nearly everyone has some.