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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


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About SkyBlue4

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  1. My Vit D went from the low end of insufficient (on supplements for years) to the high end of sufficient (without any supplements at all) after just 6 months gluten free. My antibodies were all down to almost nothing as well.   I was so happy that I wanted to frame that lab report! 
  2. I was just in to see my doctor today about a similar issue I'm having.       Just over 2 weeks ago I suddenly started having GI symptoms and initially assumed an accidental glutening.,,,Then I started to worry thinking perhaps something else was going on b/c it seemed soooo long to still have symptoms. My doc assured me that it can take some people weeks to a month or more to see their symptoms diminish from a single exposure. She suggested I give it a bit more time and in the meantime take probiotics and stick to a BRAT diet til I start to feel better. I'm hoping it resolves soon!   And hope you feel better too!
  3. Thank goodness! I thought it was just me!     
  4. I think if your labs are positive AND you know you feel better gluten-free, the single biopsy was simply not enough to provide an accurate diagnosis.   My blood work was positive and 2 doctors diagnosed me with celiac disease. I was actually the one that insisted on pursuing an endoscopy. I was not happy that in the end he only took one biopsy though (and it was negative) but he still diagnosed me with celiac disease based on my blood work. I have been gluten-free for 4.5 months and plan to have my labs repeated at the 6 month mark to see if my antibodies are dropping.   This process can be quite frustrating if your doctors are not hearing your concerns. We've all experienced that at one point or another. Hang in there.      
  5. Iga Deficiency

    My understanding is the IgA deficiency will not change. It is what it is. BUT I'm certainly hoping that my overall health will improve as my gut heals and this will make me less "sickly". 
  6. Think I Got It :(

    Sorry to hear you aren't feeling well. I read this and ran to check my cans of tuna again...they read gluten-free! They do contain soy though. Hope you feel better soon. 
  7. We tried them and my kids really liked them. Unfortunately, my store stopped carrying them for some reason.
  8. Annoyed

    Wow, look at the difference in your eyes alone!  
  9. Frustrated

      I was thinking the same. The IgA tests in the celiac panel would not be accurate if your total IgA is low or deficient. 
  10. gluten-free Survival Kit For Vehicle

    I keep crackers and protein bars in my car. And it has definitely come in handy at times!
  11. Ocd/gad And Ncgi/celiac?

    I have anxiety with OCD also and have been gluten-free since November (other than accidental glutenings early on). I had really hoped that going gluten-free would relieve my anxiety symptoms but I haven't noticed any improvement yet. Its a terrible cycle for me of stress= anxiety-> insomnia-> exhaustion-> anxiety -> etc. I want to get off this merry-go-round!    For those that have felt relief with going gluten-free, I'm wondering- was it immediately noticeable for you?  I'm not a patient person but I was so hoping that things would improve by now.
  12.   Type 2 is not autoimmune.   In rereading my earlier post, I see that my response was pretty unclear. What I was trying to say is that I am not sure if there is any connection between celiac disease (autoimmune) and Type 2 (not autoimmune). Sorry for the confusing post earlier    Dealing with both diets together is...well....challenging.     Btw cyclinglady, my family LOVES cheesy cauliflower "fake" mashed potatoes!  
  13.   Type 1 is autoimmune. Not sure about Type 2 and celiac disease.  Are you sure you have Type 2? It's baffling but there are still a lot of doctors out there who mistakenly diagnose Type 2 simply because you are an adult at the time of diagnosis. 
  14. What Else Are They Missing?

    Or get a new pediatrician. I'm thinking about it but my options are limited and not necessarily better. This morning I was able to get the office to agree to test one of my kids (b/c she's always constipated) but I still have to fight for my other kids b/c they don't present with "symptoms". What a joke. 
  15. Low Iga

    I'm told it doesn't mean a whole lot but it did explain why I seem to catch every little cold my kids bring home.    "People with selective IgA deficiency are usually asymptomatic,[5][6] but can have increased frequency of infections, particularly in the respiratory, digestive and genitourinary systems, for example, sinusitis and urinary tract infections. These infections are generally mild and would not usually lead to an in-depth workup except when unusually frequent."     "How common is IgA deficiency in those with celiac disease? 2-5% of those with celiac disease are IgA-deficient, and 0.5-1% of the general population. If IgA deficient, or if there is some other equivocating factor to potentially compromise the blood test, then an EMA blood test is also given."