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smilla

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  1. I have a much easier updated recipe. This is for a bulk amount of playdough, eg. if you are providing for a preschool class for everyone to share. In a food processor mill 1 cup cheapest cooking salt until it is very fine. Add 500g rice flour, 300g cornstarch, 6 teaspoons cream of tartar and blend until nicely combined. Tip out into large pot (I use an 8L stock pot) - doesn't need to be on the stove. You don't cook this mixture! Measure out 3 cups (750ml) boiling water and add 2 teaspoons of oil and a big squirt of food colouring. pour boiling water mix into pot and mix mix mix. It will come together quite quickly and once it really thickens you can start to knead it in the pot. It will be pretty hot still but I like the warmth on my hands. Knead for a bit until it is mixed smoothly and all the flour is incorporated. cover pot with some plastic wrap and the lid and once it cools down you will have a mega preschool class sized playdough batch that has taken about 5 minutes to make.
  2. Just logged on to update a playdough recipe that I put on here about a year ago and found this thread! In answer to your question, can they get sick from playdough? I don't know but I have my suspicions. My daughter played with gluten playdough two weeks ago on her first day of kindy. There was a crossed wire and I though they were going to make gluten free playdough, but they had come to an executive decision, without telling me, that it would be 'better for her development' to 'learn to manage herself around gluten' and that they would watch her wash her hands carefully after playing. She played with it all day (she thought it was gluten free, she would never have touched it otherwise). For the next week she became constipated, complained of a sore tummy, and started wetting the bed every night which she hasn't done in ages. I don't know if this was a glutening, it could have just been that she was at her first day at preschool and forgot to drink all day. Who knows. She's fine now. I ended up insisting my daughter have gluten free playdough at her preschool. She would never put it in her mouth but she touches her face and her lips all the time and I couldn't trust her to wash all that sticky gluten off properly before lunch. The compromise is that I provide it, a new batch, equivalent to 6 cups of flour worth each week, for everyone to play with. I did some experimenting and wanted to share what I found as it is very easy and quick and makes a huge batch of nice, soft non sticky playdough. I use rice flour from the asian grocer which is $1.55 for 500g and supermarket home-brand cornstarch which is $1.50 for 300g. No cook amazingly quick gluten free play-dough! In a food processor mill 1 1/2 cup cheapest cooking salt until it is very fine. Add 500g rice flour, 300g cornstarch, 6 teaspoons cream of tartar and blend until nicely combined. Tip out into large pot (I use an 8L stock pot) - doesn't need to be on the stove. You don't cook this mixture! Measure out 3 cups (750ml) boiling water and add 2 teaspoons of oil and a big squirt of food colouring. pour boiling water mix into pot and mix mix mix. It will come together quite quickly and once it really thickens you can start to knead it in the pot. It will be pretty hot still but I like the warmth on my hands. Knead for a bit until it is mixed smoothly and all the flour is incorporated. cover pot with some plastic wrap and the lid and once it cools down you will have a mega preschool class sized playdough batch that has taken about 5 minutes to make. Hope that helps. I would be curious to know if anyone has had a kid have an actual definite glutening from playdough. We are obsessive so my daughter has never been knowingly glutened since she was diagnosed over two years ago so we aren't even sure what to look out for as signs. To her preschool teacher's credit, they have now checked all the paints and glues to make sure they are gluten free too, which is nice, but doesn't bother me as much as playdough which is basically pure gluten, guaranteed to cause a reaction if given half a chance, which is why I bothered to make a fuss. (I hate making a fuss)
  3. My daughter's levels were reported as >100 for both antibodies. It took over two years of strict to the point of obsessive gluten free for them to return to normal levels (<20). Don't be discouraged if they don't come down right away. As long as they are heading in the right direction you are doing a great job.
  4. Hi, I just finished experimenting and have a recipe for easy gluten free play dough that isn't too sticky or crumbly. I thought I would share it here. It is an adaptation of a recipe I found here a couple of years ago when my daughter was first diagnosed. http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/22445-flippin-playdoughgrrr-i-need-help/ This is a simplified version. Hope it helps! Gluten free play dough In a large mixing bowl place: ½ cup gluten free cornflour (corn starch) ½ cup rice flour ½ cup salt 2 teaspoons cream of tartar (gluten-free) 1 teaspoon of oil Add food colouring to 1 cup of boiling water then add water to bowl and mix until it makes a smooth paste. Leave until mix cools to room temperature or just above. (20-30 mins) Add: ½ cup rice flour ½ cup gluten free corn flour and mix/knead until combined. At this stage the dough is usually still a little sticky so add a little more cornflour as needed. Voila! Beautiful gluten free play dough. I find that using fine salt gives the nicest texture. This play dough tends to get stickier over time rather than dry out, so sometimes I add a little bit of cornflour at the beginning of a play dough session if needed.
  5. And watching your daughter's energy levels and wellbeing improve will keep you motivated. It's just magical to see the improvement, but even this takes time.
  6. I also just borrowed every book from the local library on coeliac. The one I found the easiest to read and understand in my frazzled state was: "The First Year - Celiac Disease and Living Gluten-Free" by Jules Dowler Shepard
  7. It gets easier and less expensive with time. We spent a months pay just on food in the first couple of weeks after diagnosis. There is a lot of trial and error as you try all the gluten-free alternatives. We are 18 months post diagnosis and everything feels pretty normal again. Except no takeaway. And that's probably a good thing. It is a huge adjustment but now it is just life as ususal for us. I think we are all eating healthier as a result of having to be mindful of our food, but we still let ourselves be slack and give them baked beans and microwaved cheese quesadillas sometimes.
  8. Ditto all the people who said yes. Both from what my paediatric GI told me and from personal experience even trace amounts of gluten ingested by myself could lead to a serious glutening for my baby. Her poos would turn black and become like little pebbles that would roll out the side of her nappy. Poor darling.
  9. After two days the whites of my 2yo daughter's eyes became brighter. There were some definite improvements to behaviour straight away. That said we are 12 months down the track and still not fully recovered.
  10. Hi, I would like to share a playdough recipe which I have been making with really consistent success. I adapted it from a recipe I found here and the thermomix recipe book version. I am pretty sure this could be adapted for most of the cooking/stirring machines out there. Here goes: Ingredients: 1 cup salt (280g) 1 cup gluten-free cornflour/cornstarch (150g) 1 cup rice four (150g) - you can mill this yourself but I hate the noise so I usually just use premilled 2 cups (500g) water 1 tbsp cream of tartar 2 tsp oil eg olive, grapeseed Another cup each of cornstarch and rice flour to add later Method: Mill salt on 9 for 30 seconds Add water and cream of tartar and heat at 60 degrees C for 5 minutes speed 3 Add 1cup each of rice and cornflour(starch) and mix on speed 5 at 60 degrees C for about 2 minutes - the mix should be just starting to get a bit thick and gloopy, but definitely not as thick as usual playdough Add the 2 tsp oil (I always forget to do this!!!) and mix again, no heat. At this point I usually transfer it to a covered bowl to cool, but if you don't need to use your thermomix for a few hours, just cover it and let it cool to room temperature, then add 2/3 cup of rice flour and 2/3 cup corn starch and mix again on about speed 5 If you have taken it out and put it in a bowl you can do this by hand and knead the flour in. This is fun for a little helper to do. It is really important to let the mix cool down as if you add the extra flour too soon it turns out crumbly. You will now have approx 1L of amazing, smooth, soft gluten-free playdough that last for ages if you keep it in an airtight container. No need to refrigerate it To colour: either add the colour in the first step, or once the dough is complete, divide into smaller balls and knead the colour through, or just return each ball to thermie to evenly mix the colour through. I have made this several times now and it is really the best recipe I have found. There is no locally available gluten-free playdough where I live so it is great to be able to make it for my daughter's preschool class in bulk. I no longer get the feeling of dread I used to when making playdough, wondering if it would sticky or crumbly. Hope this will be helpful for some other parent/grandparents/teachers of kids with celiac/coeliac.
  11. I am having issues with this at my daughter's preschool. They use play dough every session. I am sure the entire classroom is covered with a film of gluten. They also have a bread and butter and vegemite station which they are refusing to alter in any way to make safe for my daughter. Anyway. I bring play dough in and get them to wipe down the play dough equipment. I found a brilliant recipe on here somewhere. http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/22445-flippin-playdoughgrrr-i-need-help/ It is the one where you add more rice and corn flour after the original mix has cooled down. Easy, cheap, and lasts for ages.
  12. I think that it definitely could be affecting her. I noticed my little one (13 months) got severe constipation (her sign of being glutened) when I ate 'gluten-free' food at a not totally reliable restaurant, so even small amounts of contamination can have an effect.
  13. My daughter had not grown for a year when she was diagnosed at age two. She didn't grow for another six months after going on gluten-free diet and iron and multivitamin supplements. Now she has had a little spurt and we are all feeling much happier. It felt like forever though!! Still, if you are concerned always check. Totally worth being labelled a neurotic parent if it helps your little one be healthier.