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Jmg

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About Jmg

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  1. Thanks for posting this Adrien, it's a great list and I and others will appreciate the effort and the thought behind it. I loved my time in Malaysia and I'm glad I sampled all the food I could whilst I was still on an unrestricted diet. The good thing is that, like you say, some of the nice Malay foods are still ok. As a backpacker I survived on a lot of nasi goreng and laksa, nice to think if I return there I could still do the same Terima kasih!
  2. Hello Hanna and welcome! You've found a great site, there's lot's of support and info available here, mostly from people with far more knowledge than myself. I'm sure you'll get some useful responses. First off, don't worry. You are only just starting your healing process so you have lots of recovery ahead, it will be mainly up, but sometimes down. The good news is your young, you discovered this early and you will feel better in the days ahead. For me, my skin improved after going gluten free but it didn't resolve my issues. I subsequently found that dairy had a big impact on my skin, lot's of celiacs find this as the intestinal damage can affect the body's capacity to handle dairy. So if you do eat dairy you may want to consider trying cutting it out of your diet to see if it has any effect. There are other food intolerances which may also be an issue, once you cut out gluten they can become apparent. Best way to identify those is by keeping a food diary and going on an exclusion diet then adding them in one by one. Hopefully you've seen a dietician since your diagnosis, they could advise you further on this to make sure you don't miss vital nutrients whilst excluding foods. Finally, I know you say you've been strict gluten-free, but do consider the chance of being glutened, its possible that there's a tiny amount your reacting to, perhaps from using old cookware or chopping boards. As you progress on the GD diet you may become more sensitive to ever smaller amounts of gluten. Something to consider anyway. I'm sure there will be further responses but you should also look further on this site and also check out the newbie thread here: All the best!
  3. Thanks for those responses. Both very helpful. I can't remember how much if anything I'd had to drink on the day they took blood, but it was very hot. So that may be one explanation. I posted the same question on patient.info and got this reassuring reply: I'll go back to worrying about gluten
  4. Hi all, I don't know whether kidney disease is celiac related or not but hopefully someone here can advise. I recently had a general blood test as I'd been feeling unwell. I think I've been glutened tbh but I also felt lethargic and out of sorts. I asked for thyroid and other levels to be checked. Frustratingly they didnt run the TTG - something I'm really down about. Anyway, The doctor looked at my test results and told me (via the receptionist) there was nothing to worry about. Given past experiences I requested a paper copy of the results and I found the following under the renal profile section:Renal profile 142 (135-145)Serum Sodium 4.7 (3.5 5.3)Serum potassium 5.5 (2.5 - 7.5)Serum urea 93 (62 - 120)Serum creatinine 93 (62 - 120)GFR 77ml/min/1.73m^2 - STAGE 2: CKD only if other evidence of renal damageThe doctor is presumably happy with this but I'm a little concerned. Should I ask for a doctors appointment and perhaps a urine test? Is the GFR result on its own not sufficient reason to investigate further? Many thanks for any advice you can offer Matt
  5. That has the same name as one of my favourite beers from one of my favourite cities: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kölsch_(beer) IF it tastes the same I'd be sorely tempted!
  6. A noticeable improvement within 3 days for me. Many more improvements over longer term. Suggest you keep a diary logging how you feel, what you eat and what time. If changes are gradual it can be hard to notice but looking back over the diary entries can give you an insight into just how you were feeling as your diet changed.
  7. I thought so till I saw Jalvaraz's post. Turns out there's a gluten-free version http://www.glutenfreeandmore.com/issues/2_2/miso_makeover-1630-1.html
  8. I finally found out my gluten issues right after I left a very stressful job and could no longer function I was so ill. Symptoms had gone on for decades before, but it took a moment of stress to bring it to a head. I had anxiety gerd and the irregular heartbeat and I had a nasty bout of shingles when I was 20 which I've subsequently realised was due to my compromised immune system. Shingles follows a particular nerve around the body which is probably why Cristiana's dr suspected it. I had it from the front right of torso moving around to my back. The pain you describe is similar to how shingles felt before the blisters arrived, it starts with the skin feeling very tender as if it's been burnt. Maybe you're getting the forerunner to it and your body is successfully stopping it progressing? Ah, enough amateur doctoring from me! I hope you get the answers you need and are soon on the way to recovery. Sending you best wishes.
  9. The second link I gave you was to a series of online video courses, you can try those for free to see if its something you think might help. There are also a lot of worksheets you can download, the first link had some I think but there are plenty of others out there if you search online. Finally I had another look and found this: http://www.getselfhelp.co.uk/step1.htm Which looks like a decent 7 step program Obviously its not as good as a dedicated session with a CBT counsellor, but the above may give you some tools you can use, especially when your thoughts are spiralling into a destructive circle. You could also search to see if there's any group sessions in Melbourne, that's how the NHS delivers it, they would be cheaper and there's really no need for one on one CBT, because it's more about delivering knowledge of the toolset. I approached it very sceptically but found it of some use, although at the time I was still under the gluten influence so it never tackled the root problem. The game changing aspect of discovering this is that you now know why the psychologist sessions didn't hit the mark, how could they when the root of your depression was your illness? My sessions now are far better and more enjoyable than when I was under a gluten fog. Aside from all this the other advice holds, eat well, exercise, get sunlight every day and the longer you're on the diet the better you should get. Oh and at least NI put up a hell of a fight in the Euros, hope you got to see that down under!
  10. I definitely had more energy, I was virtually bedridden beforehand, but it also felt like something of a serotonin boost, and, bizarre as it sounds, my senses seemed heightened. I felt great and I didn't know why.
  11. Excellent. The chances are your body won't absorb some of this however so get as many good B sources in your diet as possible in addition. Get some sunshine as well, I know it does rain sometimes in Melbourne but believe me on that score you do a lot better than the poms. Try and note these positive things, it's so easy when you're down to forget them. There will be more to come. Imagine yourself climbing a mountain. There are points at which you have to travel laterally or even down in order to follow the right path but your overall trajectory is upwards. You're actually lucky to have found it now at 28 with so much time ahead for healing and enjoying the fruits of it. For me the gluten reaction is the initial cause of the depression but once that's removed it doesn't automatically lift like magic. Whilst the brain fog lifted soon on gluten-free diet, (there was a physical perceptible feeling in my head whilst I had that, a kind of thickness sort of like wearing a diving mask all the time that distances you from the world), the longer term depression isn't so easily shifted. I think this is because there are negative pathways that have been reinforced over many years. That's what living in a constant state of anxiety can do. It wrecks your self esteem which isn't magically repaired as your diet changes, sadly! As my physical symptoms lifted but I still felt depression, if on a different level, I realised I'd have to heal my mind as well as my gut. So I'm currently seeing a counsellor and it is helping. Not there yet though Yes I also get this and the mental side for me is also by far the worst side of it. I used to think I may die every time I got the chest pains but that wasn't as bad as feeling like shit 24/7 or having to fake a good time when feeling awful inside. The single best thing about realising my gluten problem was that it explained that the underlying cause of that depression and anxiety was physical, not a defect of character, just some bad luck in the makeup of my gut and immune system. Hope that knowledge helps you also, when the anxiety strikes recognise it for what it is. A misdirected fight or flight response to an internal attack on your body. Have a look at some cognitive behavioural therapy techniqes for challenging negative thoughts, that may be helpful? CBT has a very good success rate here in UK, better than anti depressants or talking therapy I think and it focuses on the practical,. As you realise there's a load of bulls**t in society about how we view and discuss mental health. Don't buy into it. A lot of 'strong' people out there are simply bottling up their suffering through misguided pride. If people stigmatise you they're doing you the favour of letting you know they're not worth bothering with. I got a lot of support on here when I was in your position and I'm sure you will too. I wish you the best of luck and I'm sure you'll be seeing more improvements in the weeks and months to come.
  12. As you doubtless know now, there are so many ways celiac can present, here's as big a list as I could find online. It would probably be quicker to list what isn't a factor For me personally, nausua, check, left sided back hip pain (my laymans theory here is that celiac is affecting the sciatic nerve which runs from lower back down leg) , check, chest pain also - but for me this comes in short bursts more I guess like heartburn - I thought I was having heart attacks... Check to the rest too... And, for what its worth, other things like being prone to bronchial infection oh hell yes. I'm currently in the glutened / affected by something group myself so I can only share the advice I've been given. Start a food diary and see if you can track down anything diet related that may be affecting you. Eat as clean as you can, ease up on alcohol, just try and give yourself the best chance of recovery. Have a google of 'heal my gut' diet tips too, you're in the recovery phase at the moment. All the best, at least there's comfort in knowing you're not alone! Matt
  13. G'day Chris and welcome to the forum. You have found what I think is the single best resource on the web for advice, support and understanding for this condition. There is so much info here it's difficult to know where to start, but that's what this thread is for, please check it out. I think I got the recommendation for 'Real life with Celiac Disease' by Dennis and Leffler there, I'll second that, there's a lot of very useful info in there which helps to answer a lot of your questions. May be useful for your partner also. Chapters are short and informative so you can dip in and out. There will doubtless be more advice to come from others with more experience but there's a few things which occur. Firstly, 10 weeks is very early days. Your body has been under an assault for many, many years. Your immune system has been working overtime and like so many others you've only reached diagnosis after reaching a crisis point. You are now healing but it won't be instant and it won't be without ups and downs, speedier and slower phases. Second, being strict on gluten is essential, but it's only one part of the puzzle. You also need to eat really healthily and try to heal your gut. As you remove gluten you may find that your body starts telling you that other foods are also an issue. Don't panic, it doesn't mean that will always be the case. But you need to approach the next 6 months as a period where you're giving your body the easiest ride possible. That may mean taking probiotics, bone broths or it could also mean avoiding dairy or other foods, at least until your body has had a chance to heal. If you think you may still be getting gluteny effects keeping a food diary, noting what you eat, when and how you feel would help to track down any further issues. I too battled through the anxiety, had an all too brief moment of bliss as the diet kicked in, then faced a bumpier recovery period in the weeks that followed. It gets easier but it's still difficult for me from time to time. I tried to articulate some of this recently here, it's a long read but maybe some of it will strike a chord. It will get better and you will become better equipped to deal with it. If you're like me you'll find other things getting better over time that you would never have thought to connect to gluten. Now, I've been exceedlingly nice here and not mentioned the England Rugby drubbing but I can feel my self control beginning to slip. So I'll leave it there Matt
  14. The bloating has, if anything, got worse. It seems better when I'm lay down, when I stand it gets worse. Although the lymph swelling has gone down so maybe I'm through the worst. Hope so anyway... I never used to get a great deal of GI symptoms. Certainly not so serious as the other stuff. It's making me wonder if I just react differently now having been gluten-free for some time. I've noticed lot's of you saying that reactions seem to change over time. Of course its possible the other stuff was masking the GI things. I almost dont trust my memory of those times anymore because a whole chunk of my life seems to have been lived through a brain fog. Tomorrow I'm thinking of going away for a couple of days, maybe just taking some ultra simple food with me so I can try and settle my stomach by boring it into submission
  15. Yeah I did all the bone broths and sauerkraut after my challenge. Although I wasn't very good at making sauerkraut... Its summer here now so I've eased up on the bone boiling, plus my local butcher is struggling to obtain them. As you say healing to the point where microscopic cross contamination doesn't get you would be a big win. I was ok with coffee until last few days. I drank decaff black and would have several cups a day without issue. I'll be gutted if I can't handle it any more. I hadn't realised you could get gluten-free miso soup. Will have to look for that