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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


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About hathawayrc

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  1. Hello! I've recently taken my son, aged nearly 4, to the doctor as he has been suffering for at least a year with persistent tiredness, irritability, tummy bloating, poor appetite, very waxy ears and nail ridges. In the past month he has had at least 3 infections, and seems to take longer to get over bugs than his one year old brother. I took him to the docs because he has developed dark circles under his eyes and has had several tantrums apparently caused by exhaustion, even on days when we have done relatively little exercise. Having said that, sometimes he can have a really good day and my husband and I question whether we are being paranoid by getting him tested for illness!   The doctor diagnosed anaemia after I insisted on a blood test (he said anaemia was rare in non-vegetarian children like my son) and gave us iron liquid, which we have to sneak into my son's food and drinks. My mother in law is a diagnosed coeliac, so I asked about a test for that but the doctor was reluctant to do it unless my son had been on the iron liquid for two months, improved and then relapsed into anaemia. After my son had a particularly bad week I asked to be referred for a private test, which has come back negative (ttg less than 0.1, hb slightly improved from 115 to 118 after a month on supplements). The consultant we saw is checking the IgA level, which I understand can cause a false negative if it's low, but it looks like we are going to have to traumatise my son further by having another blood test to rule out wheat, dairy and egg allergies.   I suppose my question is, has anyone's child had similar symptoms and tested negative on the ttg, but improved on a gluten-free diet? It is just impossible to do anything with my son sometimes as he is so irritable, and I am concerned that when he starts school in September he will be labelled a 'problem child'. He has already been referred for special needs assessment by his preschool because he does not want to join in with many activities. I am tempted to try going gluten-free anyway to see if it makes him feel better, especially as my husband (also negative on coeliac test) has many coeliac-like symptoms.   Any experience, suggestions or advice very gratefully received! I'm feeling a bit at my wits end, as you can probably tell...