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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity


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About millerb68

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  1. Aldi's

    Aldi is owned by the same company as Trader Joe's, so often Aldi's products are exactly the same as Trader Joe's but in different packaging and at a lower price. I shop both stores for all of my groceries and can pick out the same products now pretty easily. I'm not going to pay $4.99 for a package of three bell peppers at TJs when the exact same package at Aldi is $1.99.
  2. I have bought TJ's gluten-free oats for a long time, but discovered through process of elimination they were causing me some big issues, so I'm currently not using them. I don't know if it's just their oats or any gluten-free oats, but I'm taking a break from oats until I've healed more. So I would say, eat at your own risk.
  3. You could have subclinical hypothyroidism, which sounds fake, but it's not. It's when your thyroid levels show up normal on tests, but you still have all the symptoms.   I think the diagnosis of Hashimoto's has to do with the antibodies. 
  4. This is a great post on whether or not to "cheat", (which means that you are cheating on yourself).
  5. Testing For Intolerances?

    I would recommend trying the low FODMAPs diet, which works for many people with IBS. Here's a chart that gives some idea of what it is, but you can Google it for more info:   And I will add that I did have the IgG testing last year and it helped to identify many foods to which I have sensitivities. Once I cut them out, I saw some improvement, but because of the then-undiagnosed celiac and leaky gut, I developed many more. 
  6. Thank you for sharing this! Their gluten-free flour prices are really reasonable. 
  7. I think the benefit to getting tested is a diagnosis for which you can receive treatment. As you probably know, celiac is much more than just digestive issues or rashes -- it's an autoimmune disease that can have effects throughout the whole body. For some people, simply not eating gluten or whatever else causes issues fixes the issue and they can go on with their lives, but others still have a lot of symptoms and related conditions even after stopping gluten for which they need help. That's where a medical diagnosis comes in handy. 
  8. If you have issues with fructose, you might want to take a look at this list: and do some research on the FODMAPs diet. Essentially, it's different kinds of carbohydrates, proteins and fats that some people have problems tolerating. Dried fruit is on the list, as are grains such as wheat and rye, which contain gluten. Here's another list:   I would find another doctor willing to test you for celiac disease rather than prescribing a cream for the rashes. I had rashes as a primary symptom of my celiac disease as well, and it took a while to connect the dots. The creams didn't work, by the way.    Good luck! 
  9. Xanthan Gum

    Yes! And I've discovered it the hard way. Last week I made my husband some oatmeal cookies with xantham gum (he is not gluten-free but I only bake and cook gluten-free), and I ate one. I was sick for 2 days! It was suggested that I try guar gum to see if it's any better. 
  10. I use Deva Vegan products: It doesn't specifically say it doesn't have corn, but I don't see that it does, but you'd probably have to call them.    You can also check Country Life brand (
  11. I Need Pizza!

    If you want to order some frozen from a great gluten-free restaurant, try this: I ate there last weekend while in the area and it was the best gluten-free pizza I've ever had.    Otherwise, if you cook, here are some links to recipes:
  12. Should I Be Tested?

    Healthsohard: I'm sorry you are struggling to find answers. It seems that we all have to go through many hoops before we can find some. I am very thankful to have finally found a physician (functional medicine) who listened to me, didn't think I was crazy and knew what to look for. She diagnosed me with celiac, leaky gut and subclinical hypothyroid (this means my thyroid ranges are within the normal range, but some other markers indicated to her that it was still hypo, so that's why it's called "Subclinical.")    I just found a brand new book by an actress named Jennifer Esposito, who went years and years before finding a doc who was able to diagnose her with celiac. If nothing else, it's good to read what she went through and had to ask for to get the help she needed. She also has a website:    Don't give up! 
  13. If anyone is ever in the Baltimore area, go to One Dish Cuisine in Ellicott City. They cater exclusively to people with celiac and food allergies. It was the first time I've been able to eat a gluten-free, dairy-free pizza somewhere other than my own home, and it was delicious!
  14. So Tired, Can't Stay Awake.

    Yes, this is one of my primary symptoms, even being 10 months gluten-free, and what made me go to my now-former primary care doc three years in a row (he told me three times "you are doing too much."). Some days I can barely hold my eyes open at work, so I have to get up and walk outside. For me, it's got to be another food sensitivity/allergy/intolerance and the leaky gut. I wish I had advice to offer, but I'm hoping others do, because it's really debilitating, and people don't understand the overwhelming sense of fatigue is not just being tired.    Edit: to add that I was also diagnosed by my new doc with subclinical hypothyroid. Maybe that's a possibility?
  15. Biscuits

    I'm not sure if you're looking for a bread-like American biscuit, but here's a recipe:   If you're looking for a cookie, try or