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Hair Detective

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  1. In the 2006 book - Celiac Disease - A Hidden Epidemic....the author Dr. Green from Columbia University who runs the Celiac center....says that Celiacs have a 30% odds of getting an autoimmune disease versus the rest of the population which is 3%. Cancer is 2X as likely to occur if you have celiac. Inflammation is the bodies response to an outside invader...parasite, flu bug, food poisoning, and gluten if you're celiac. So the body responses...like firefighters would to a 911 call. The problem is if you've ever cleaned up after a fire...the water and chemical sprays can be as damaging as the fire. So image you're body is doing a 911 drill everytime you eat gluten....lots of fire damage :-)
  2. I would suggest researching Dr. Fine's stool test....it does not require going back on a gluten diet. I found the testing process very confusing...so I've spent quite a bit of time trying to figure it out. The stool test showed gluten sensitivity and t-transglutaminase autoimmune response in my daughter who has alopecia. The problem from my perspective is that waiting to be diagnosed with celiac disease negates the opportunity to take action BEFORE there's villa damage. You can order the stool tests online and submit the tests to your insurance provider directly. http://www.finerhealth.com/Educational_Inf...ests_are_normal Love to hear the result if you do the test. And from my Newsletter, Inside Out, here's a summary on testing as I researched it. Testing for Gluten Sensitivity and Celiac When it was discovered in the 1940s that gluten was the cause of celiac disease, the best diagnostic test was to remove gluten from the diet and see if you got better. Then in 1950 a biopsy to detect damage to the villi in the intestine was developed and became the “gold standard”. In the 1970s, 80s and 90’s, new blood tests were developed to detect antibodies in the blood (IgG, IgA, t-transglutaminase) allowing doctors to diagnose individuals with celiac without an invasive biopsy. But the blood tests had a problem. A positive blood test indicated that you had celiac, but a negative test result didn’t necessarily mean you were okay. In fact, the two blood tests commonly used to make a diagnosis are only accurate 59% of the time and, in the early stage of celiac disease, before damage to the intestine occurs, the tests only detect celiac 31% of the time. In the late 1990s, Dr. Kenneth Fine developed a stool test. The test has a higher accuracy for detecting celiac and gluten sensitivity, in addition to showing that celiac is just the tip of the iceberg of gluten induced diseases.
  3. I would agree with the suggestion to try the stool test...it does not require going back on a gluten diet. The stool test showed gluten sensitivity and t-transglutaminase autoimmune response in my daughter who has alopecia. The problem from my perspective is that waiting to be diagnosed with celiac disease negates the opportunity to take action BEFORE there's villa damage. You can order the stool tests online and submit the tests to your insurance provider directly. http://www.finerhealth.com/Educational_Inf...ests_are_normal Interestly from the NIH web site...."Sometimes the disease (celiac) is triggered-or becomes active for the first time-after surgery, pregnancy, childbirth, viral infection, or severe emotional stress." www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/#2 Love to hear the result if you do the test. And from my Newsletter, Inside Out.... Testing for Gluten Sensitivity and Celiac When it was discovered in the 1940s that gluten was the cause of celiac disease, the best diagnostic test was to remove gluten from the diet and see if you got better. Then in 1950 a biopsy to detect damage to the villi in the intestine was developed and became the “gold standard”. In the 1970s, 80s and 90’s, new blood tests were developed to detect antibodies in the blood (IgG, IgA, t-transglutaminase) allowing doctors to diagnose individuals with celiac without an invasive biopsy. But the blood tests had a problem. A positive blood test indicated that you had celiac, but a negative test result didn’t necessarily mean you were okay. In fact, the two blood tests commonly used to make a diagnosis are only accurate 59% of the time and, in the early stage of celiac disease, before damage to the intestine occurs, the tests only detect celiac 31% of the time. In the late 1990s, Dr. Kenneth Fine developed a stool test. The test has a higher accuracy for detecting celiac and gluten sensitivity, in addition to showing that celiac is just the tip of the iceberg of gluten induced diseases.
  4. I'd suggest Dr. Kenneth Fine's stool test for your cousin's children. This test showed gluten sensitivity and t-transglutaminase autoimmune response in my daughter who has alopecia. The problem from my perspective is that waiting to be diagnosed with celiac disease negates the opportunity to take action BEFORE there's villa damage. You can order the stool tests online and submit the tests to your insurance provider directly. http://www.finerhealth.com/Educational_Inf...ests_are_normal Love to hear the results if she goes down this path. And from my Newsletter, Inside Out.... Testing for Gluten Sensitivity and Celiac When it was discovered in the 1940s that gluten was the cause of celiac disease, the best diagnostic test was to remove gluten from the diet and see if you got better. Then in 1950 a biopsy to detect damage to the villi in the intestine was developed and became the “gold standard”. In the 1970s, 80s and 90’s, new blood tests were developed to detect antibodies in the blood (IgG, IgA, t-transglutaminase) allowing doctors to diagnose individuals with celiac without an invasive biopsy. But the blood tests had a problem. A positive blood test indicated that you had celiac, but a negative test result didn’t necessarily mean you were o.k. In fact, the two blood tests commonly used to make a diagnosis are only accurate 59% of the time and, in the early stage of celiac disease, before damage to the intestine occurs, the tests only detect celiac 31% of the time. In the late 1990s, Dr. Kenneth Fine developed a stool test. The test has a higher accuracy for detecting celiac and gluten sensitivity, in addition to showing that celiac is just the tip of the iceberg of gluten induced diseases.