Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Help My 9 Yr Old Is In Pain
0

9 posts in this topic

well we have been gluten free for 3  weeks and  of a sudden he is home from school again with bad gas pains, gas that burns his  anus. He has loose bowel this a.m. and  cramps.  Celiac  blood  results  were  negative.

what  could be causing this?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Welcome Trent's Mom or Dad?

 

Did he have a complete celiac antibody panel?

 

Total Serum IgA

tTG - IgA and IgG

EMA - IgA

DGP - IgA and IgG

 

Any nutrient testing?

 

Vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12, D, K, Iron, Ferritin, Copper, Zinc

 

Complete Blood Count (CBC) and Complete Metabolic Panel (CMP)?

 

Were you gluten-free or gluten light for any period of time before the celiac antibody tests?

 

Is it possible he is eating gluten at school or in a friend's home?

 

Hang in there -- not all children with Celiac Disease test positive -- dietary results are very important with kids -- try keeping a log of what he is eating along with any symptoms -- it really helps to find possible problem foods (even gluten-free processed foods can be problematic when newly gluten-free)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second Gottaski and Dairy always makes me have that burning feeling. Even small amounts of butter. But it could be a number of things.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome Trent's Mom or Dad?

 

Did he have a complete celiac antibody panel?

 

Total Serum IgA

tTG - IgA and IgG

EMA - IgA

DGP - IgA and IgG

 

Any nutrient testing?

 

Vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12, D, K, Iron, Ferritin, Copper, Zinc

 

Complete Blood Count (CBC) and Complete Metabolic Panel (CMP)?

 

Were you gluten-free or gluten light for any period of time before the celiac antibody tests?

 

Is it possible he is eating gluten at school or in a friend's home?

 

Hang in there -- not all children with Celiac Disease test positive -- dietary results are very important with kids -- try keeping a log of what he is eating along with any symptoms -- it really helps to find possible problem foods (even gluten-free processed foods can be problematic when newly gluten-free)

Thank you, but the Dr. only tested D and Iron , CBC, Complete metabolic panel, celiac panel, and Thyroid.

We were on a light gluten free when testing with blood work. No , he is so afraid to consume Gluten so he is very disciplined about his food choices! Thank God!

Have you heard of enterolab? and what are your opinions? it cost alot, but I am interested!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, but the Dr. only tested D and Iron , CBC, Complete metabolic panel, celiac panel, and Thyroid.

We were on a light gluten free when testing with blood work. No , he is so afraid to consume Gluten so he is very disciplined about his food choices! Thank God!

Have you heard of enterolab? and what are your opinions? it cost alot, but I am interested!

Doesn't matter what I think. See what Celiac experts think:

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/why-dont-you-recognize-tests-stool-tests-or-otherwise-for-gluten-sensitivity-that-are-currently-available-through-companies-like-enterolab-or-cyrex

"Why don’t you recognize tests (stool tests or otherwise) for non-celiac gluten sensitivity that are currently available through companies like Enterolab or Cyrex?

We only embrace tests that have endured rigorous scientific evaluations. So far, these tests have received no evidence-based support.

Enterolab has never successfully published anything on the accuracy of stool tests (nor have any other stool test manufacturers, to our knowledge) making it difficult to confirm the research results. Because of this, we must make our decisions based on what has been published; Harvard, UCSD, and the American College of Gastroenterology all agree that stool tests are simply not sensitive or specific enough methods in screening for celiac disease.

We can say therefore with confidence that the test currently being used by these labs is not good enough. In fact, while it is true that about 40% of people with proven gluten sensitivity have elevated AGA-IgG, it is also true that about 15-25% of the healthy individuals who have absolutely nothing wrong also have elevated AGA-IgG. Hence, about 60% of gluten sensitive people do not have elevated AGA-IgG (making the test not sensitive enough); and about 20% of normal, non-gluten sensitive people have elevated AGA-IgG for no apparent reason (making the test not specific enough).

Further reading: “Detection of secretory IgA antibodies against gliadin and human tissue transglutaminase in stool to screen for coeliac disease in children: validation study” at BMJ.com"

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




I agree with Karen's info, but have no direct experience with enterolab.

 

I believe our doctors can run all the tests necessary -- often they just don't order the correct ones.

 

Removing gluten or eating gluten light prior to celiac antibody tests can affect the results -- especially in children that don't always test strong possitive anyway.

 

If I didn't mention before -- three weeks is a very short time to be gluten-free.  You are all learning how to remove all gluten -- took our family at least three months to weed out all the sources of cross contamination in our kitchen and longer for my teens to remove it from their lives.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what could be causing this

 

1. the tests aren't 100%

2. there's such a thing as non celiac gluten intolerance

3. some people get more sensitive after being off gluten for a while, which is proof that it's a real gluten problem

4. no matter what, sometimes you or a loved one gets cross contaminated by gluten, and you have to play "search and throw out" aka seek and destroy. 

5. a small percentage of us react to even gluten free oats, which is a nuisance.  others to soy flour or dairy.  dairy may be able to be added back in later, after healing.

6. writing down everything you eat, or at least when you add a new thing in, is a good way to keep track of reactions during the shakedown phase. 

7. gluten free labeling, at times, is not optimal in this country, and I can personally attest to having reacted to things labeled as such, while just by switching brands, to something sometimes not labeled but by a better manufacturer who isn't playing around with running production on shared lines with gluten ingredients, gets rid of the reaction. 

8. people will sometimes try to feed you what they think is gluten free snacks.... their kitchens are sort of not up to spec with the cross contamination issues....  if it ain't in a sealed package where you can study the ingredients, just gently refuse, if it is from a brand you don't do well with, thank them and just come up with another excuse that you can't eat "ingredient x" so you don't hurt their feelings.     Saves lots of reactions. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't matter what I think. See what Celiac experts think:

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/why-dont-you-recognize-tests-stool-tests-or-otherwise-for-gluten-sensitivity-that-are-currently-available-through-companies-like-enterolab-or-cyrex

"Why don’t you recognize tests (stool tests or otherwise) for non-celiac gluten sensitivity that are currently available through companies like Enterolab or Cyrex?

We only embrace tests that have endured rigorous scientific evaluations. So far, these tests have received no evidence-based support.

Enterolab has never successfully published anything on the accuracy of stool tests (nor have any other stool test manufacturers, to our knowledge) making it difficult to confirm the research results. Because of this, we must make our decisions based on what has been published; Harvard, UCSD, and the American College of Gastroenterology all agree that stool tests are simply not sensitive or specific enough methods in screening for celiac disease.

We can say therefore with confidence that the test currently being used by these labs is not good enough. In fact, while it is true that about 40% of people with proven gluten sensitivity have elevated AGA-IgG, it is also true that about 15-25% of the healthy individuals who have absolutely nothing wrong also have elevated AGA-IgG. Hence, about 60% of gluten sensitive people do not have elevated AGA-IgG (making the test not sensitive enough); and about 20% of normal, non-gluten sensitive people have elevated AGA-IgG for no apparent reason (making the test not specific enough).

Further reading: “Detection of secretory IgA antibodies against gliadin and human tissue transglutaminase in stool to screen for coeliac disease in children: validation study” at BMJ.com"

thanks!!!!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was he starting to feel better during the three weeks he was gluten free?  

 

I know we had very mild symptoms (none really, except behavior) before my son was diagnosed at age 5.  Now, if he gets "glutened" accidentally, he gets all kinds of sever GI issues.  He is much more sensitive after being gluten free.

 

If you think gluten is his problem (don't dismiss it just because of negative blood tests) keep him on the diet (try for 3 months).  I suspect he ate some on accident - maybe just from cross contamination.  

 

I had a similar problem in the early weeks of the diet change.  Turned out to me by B vitamin supplement.  It had gluten in it.

 

Cara

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,352
    • Total Posts
      920,503
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I already did. Thats how i found the place. Its amazing to actually go to a restraunt again.
    • This is EXACTLY what happens to me. It has twice now and both times was after both glutening episodes but once it was the day after and the other time it was a week and a half. So I'm still not sure if it's related or strange bug bites...

      Did they stop happening when she stopped being glutened? Did you decide they were definitely related? I'm really confused by this and would love to know whether to insecticide my house or....
    • Thankyou both! I was wondering if my high levels left much doubt on the diagnosis. I don't see the GI until the 15th Sep and I don't think I can stand to eat gluten in that time. If he tells me to I will do so after then. After 25 years of symptoms I don't think there is much chance of healing my bowel In a couple of weeks. I'm actually terrified of the damage they might find. But I think I will need the endo since there may be other things going on with me. So great they didn't put your son through the biopsy! Once I have a formal diagnosis I have my kids to worry about also. I can't even stand the thought of my daughter having a blood test. I think she would need to be sedated as she is so fearful and pain sensitive. My son is not yet 2 so I don't think they will test him. I'm feeling so off at the moment. I think I have some anxiety and reflux going on complicating things quite a bit.
    • My son's antibodies were 300. Based on his extremely high levels, his pediatric GI suggested genetic testing instead of the biopsy. Genetic testing can't diagnose celiac on its own but combined with such high levels, the gi dr was confident a positive genetic test would confidently diagnose celiac. He warned that biopsies are small snapshots of the intestine and can miss damage. He said this is an approach used very often in Europe but not as much in the US. What sold me on that approach was the ability to put my son directly on a gluten free diet instead of waiting three weeks for the biopsy, during which time he would continue to eat gluten and feel terrible. I'm not sure if this is more common with younger patients though (our son is two), based on the idea that he's had less time to inflict damage that would show in a biopsy? We are very happy that we immediately started the gluten free diet and chose the genetic testing. Our son got the proper diagnosis and his recent number shows a drop to 71 after only 4.5 months gluten free! Not sure if this helps. Good luck and I hope you feel better soon!
    • We have been off gluten for a while now, and symptoms return when I've allowed gluten full meals… so something still isn't sitting right with me.  Checking with her doc about seeing a pediactric GI although I'm not sure how long that will take since we live in small town America. I know she didn't get at least one of the recommended full panel tests but maybe two, can someone help clarify, or is she missing two? DGP for sure and possibly EMA? And if I understand what I'm reading in other posts that the DGP can be more accurate? Thanks Her blood panel results: Ttg ab iga <.5u/ml ttg igg <.8u/ml aga ab iga <.2 u/ml aga an igg <.7u/ml iga 61mg/dL  
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,416
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    djs2117
    Joined