Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Non-Food Uses Of Wheat - This Terrifies Me
0

12 posts in this topic



Ads by Google:

If its food related, wouldn't they have to state that it is?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of these uses are things I don't worry about. So what if it is used to glue paper grocery bags together? I don't lick paper grocery bags. Any groceries I bring home are either in their own packages, or produce, even if it falls out of the plastic bag it is in will be washed before use because there are far more dangerous things on it than gluten. Many of the other uses of it are things in which it would be so processed that no remaining viable protein would remain.

 

With each individual thing, it is important to research the science behind it rather than to be paranoid about what is potentially nothing. Maybe it isn't safe, but maybe it is. I mean really, what do I care if skeet pigeons are made of wheat? It seems to make good ecological sense to me. And things like water-soluble inks? We aren't all going around licking paper. I really don't see a problem with most of what they are using wheat for. Do I think it needs to be in everything? Hell no, it complicates my life. But it is what it is and we simply have to deal with navigating this world without being paranoid about stuff that there is no reason to be paranoid about.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My concerns on that list would be plastic film-used regularly to cover food for storage, EATING UTENSILS- :ph34r: ,

medical swabs, biodegradable packaging-when I buy organic veggies at my local grocery chain they are

frequently packaged in this, and textile finishing agents. With the textiles it doesn't seem likely to be a problem,

it would just wash out I'd think. But what kind of medical swab? I'd love to see an actual list of brands and

companies that do this. Obviously, when in doubt wash your food off first and don't lick your packaging. But

cups? What kind of cups? That's an incredibly open-ended list..... I don't care if skeet pigeons have wheat in

them, but I do care if food packaging does.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




The gluten in wheat isn't going to be in plastic. It just doesn't work that way. When it comes to biodegradable plastic made with wheat, it is made with wheat straw, which doesn't contain the heads of the wheat, which is where the gluten is. It is just a way to use up an otherwise useless byproduct that is completely harmless to us. Will the occasional head of wheat end up in wheat straw? Of course. Would it be enough, when added to plastic to make anyone sick? No. Not unless you start eating the plastic, in which case you'll be getting sick from a lot worse things. The science of all this is why I'm not freaking out about all the places they're putting it. It just makes no sense if you actually look at how it is done instead of jumping to conclusions about how it is practically the zombie apocalypse of gluten. And fwiw I am the most paranoid person I know.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of these uses are things I don't worry about. So what if it is used to glue paper grocery bags together? I don't lick paper grocery bags. Any groceries I bring home are either in their own packages, or produce, even if it falls out of the plastic bag it is in will be washed before use because there are far more dangerous things on it than gluten. Many of the other uses of it are things in which it would be so processed that no remaining viable protein would remain.

 

With each individual thing, it is important to research the science behind it rather than to be paranoid about what is potentially nothing. Maybe it isn't safe, but maybe it is. I mean really, what do I care if skeet pigeons are made of wheat? It seems to make good ecological sense to me. And things like water-soluble inks? We aren't all going around licking paper. I really don't see a problem with most of what they are using wheat for. Do I think it needs to be in everything? Hell no, it complicates my life. But it is what it is and we simply have to deal with navigating this world without being paranoid about stuff that there is no reason to be paranoid about.

Great post, Addy!  I think if people are really that terrified or concerned about stuff like this, they need to work on those fear issues and not worry so much about things that are not a concern for even sensitive Celiacs.  More education on the science behind it is needed.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All that being said, those of us with corn intolerances or allergies DO get sick if we drink out of corn-based plastic. And we DO get sick from wiping out hands on paper towels that have corn in them and then eating. I would think that if they start using wheat in some of these products, some of the super-sensitive among us MAY have a problem.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The difference between corn and wheat plastic is that with corn plastic, they make it with the food part of corn. The part you, and many others, have a problem with. With wheat plastic, it is  made from wheat straw, the leftovers after harvesting the food, which contains no gluten and which would pose no risk to any of us. Taking the time to understand the science makes this a lot less freaky.

 

We also aren't talking about when and if they start doing these things. They are being done and have been being done for quite some time. This isn't new, it is just news for some. If it hasn't caused any of us harm yet, it is difficult to believe it will suddenly begin causing us harm just because we know about it.

 

Look, I'm not trying to be argumentative... but at some point reason and science need to intervene over our irrational fears.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A year or so ago, I emailed with a company that makes bio-plastic.  They were using mostly soy, If I remember.  They said they wouldn't use wheat.  They were going to transition over to algae in the next few years. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The difference between corn and wheat plastic is that with corn plastic, they make it with the food part of corn. The part you, and many others, have a problem with. With wheat plastic, it is  made from wheat straw, the leftovers after harvesting the food, which contains no gluten and which would pose no risk to any of us. Taking the time to understand the science makes this a lot less freaky.

 

We also aren't talking about when and if they start doing these things. They are being done and have been being done for quite some time. This isn't new, it is just news for some. If it hasn't caused any of us harm yet, it is difficult to believe it will suddenly begin causing us harm just because we know about it.

 

Look, I'm not trying to be argumentative... but at some point reason and science need to intervene over our irrational fears.

 

 

Actually, the article clearly stated that wheat stubble, or grass, is used for certain things, and that

wheat starch, which (I think?) must come from the grain itself, is used for other things. Now, I hope

sincerely that the OP has gotten over their initial freak-out reaction to this. It's easy to freak out at

everything. As for me, this article has not created any irrational fears, but honest curiosity. Obviously,

it's a generic statement being made by the grower's association, not any of the actual companies

that produce any of these products. I still think it warrants some attention paid, at least by me. I,

personally, would like to know what cups and eating utensils they're referring to. Maybe I'll write

to them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adalaide, how wonderful to hear a voice of reason. Most (I never say all) Celiacs must ingest the gluten for it to be harmful. This should relieve us of worries about shampoo, shoe polish, grocery bags and a host on non-edibles.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,684
    • Total Posts
      921,744
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I would suggest you test your daughter through a doctor. The Enterolab tests are not recognized as accurate or reliable by the medical profession. See this link from the Chicago Celiac Disease Center: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/why-dont-you-recognize-tests-stool-tests-or-otherwise-for-gluten-sensitivity-that-are-currently-available-through-companies-like-enterolab-or-cyrex/
    • Sorry.  Something is wonky with either my connection or celiac.com! Your results are not specific...borderline.    That is why your PCP should refer you to a GI for further celiac blood tests and a possible endoscopy.  I recognize the lab report form.  Kaiser?  If so, a PCP can not order a full celiac panel.  Only a GI can do so.  Why bother?  Because if you test like me, the TTG tests are always negative.  Request the EMA and the DGPS test via a GI.   Do not be fooled by a lack of abdominal symptoms.  I was only anemic -- no abdominal issues at all.  Constipation is a symptom.  Your PCP is thinking is just historical Classic celiac disease symptoms.   Please email your doctor for the referral if you think you might have celiac disease and want a solid answer.    
    • Hello, I have frequent canker sores (roughly comes back every couple of months). Some blood test results are as following. Component Your Value Standard Range TISSUE TRANSGLUTAMINASE IgG 0.31 Index <=0.90 Index Tissue transglutaminase IgA 0.96 Index <=0.90 Index My doctor said that result is unspecific, and I unlikely have celiac disease, since I do not have other abdominal symptoms. For reference, I do have frequent constipation, excessive gas, frequent canker sore, etc. Do you think an upper endoscopy is recommended? I am a little hesitate considering the risk of this procedure and the fact that my symptoms are not that bad. I appreciate all suggestions.  
    • Hello, I see you posted this a long while ago, and perhaps--I hope-- it's no longer a matter of concern, but I thought I'd mention that shortly before I was diagnosed for celiac's, I had distinct yellow blotches on the corners of my eyelids toward my nose. Some months after I had stopped eating gluten, the yellow gradually went away, and--as it just reappeared now several years later, I googled the issue again.  I am only speculating here, but I do believe it is related to liver problems, which, in turn, are related to celiac's. I don't think liver function tests cover all aspects of liver health. I say this because when I was pregnant I developed a temporary liver condition called interhepatic colestasis of pregnancy (ICP), but my liver function tests had been fine. (The condition is diagnosed based on bile levels in the blood, not on liver function). I discovered upon some research that (of course!) ICP  can be associated with celiac's disease.  My hunch is this-- that celiac's presents two problems to the liver: 1) the malabsorption of nutrients--esp. Vit. K2-- that are vital liver health; 2) since gluten registers as a toxin to the immune system (I think?), perhaps the liver gets overloaded processing so much toxic material. Or perhaps there's some other reason. At any rate, poor liver health and celiac's do seem to be linked, according to a few articles I've found. Anyway, hope your problems are resolved now.  
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,685
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    jhc
    Joined