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Am I Just A Wuss? (Staying Home After Gluten/soy/whateverings)
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95 posts in this topic

You can still get hit by a bus at the crosswalk, but then at least you can sue... (I'm also the kind of person who says, NO! I am not j-walking, I don't care if it takes longer to walk down to the lights. But then again all my close encounters with moving vehicles have happened while crossing in the proper places, so...)

 

Thanks for some perspective, Irish Heart. Yep, soy is a hard one, and I'm learning just how pervasive it is. I guess some people can handle soy oil and some can't (right now I think I'm in the can't category).

 

I might have been slightly exaggerating (or it got exaggerated) when I said "on average once a month". I was acutally just looking through my attendance records, and yes, it's been 1 day off on average, but some of those were when I was actually sick, or jetlagged, or other non-stomach related things. My job is not under threat in any way. It's more likely that if I'm not feeling well I'll just cancel any evening plans instead. I started this thread in the first place moreso because I felt bad that I had to cancel plans with a friend of mine I don't see often, and wondering if I was just being a "wuss" about the whole thing. 

 

But yes, if being sick due to glutenings is interfering with your work, or your ability to work, then you should seriously look at your lifestyle and do what ever you are able to to get better. I went though this soul-searching over the past year and have definitely made changes. I used to eat out for lunch at least once a week, and if I didn't have time to go home before an evening event, would get vietamese or something beforehand. I didn't always get glutened, but it took it's toll.

 

Now, I bring not only all my lunches but eat dinner at work if I know I'm going out to something, insist on making meals at home on the weekend unless I've vetted the restaurant beforehand, and won't eat out two days in a row or more than once in a week. The taco incident was a slip-up (I forgot to bring my dinner) but seemed pretty safe (and I probably just reacted to soy in either the oil or a sauce), and the cookies were sheer curiosity (and probably a stupid idea)

 

So, I'd call that an improvement. Still a ways to go, but much better.

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Ads by Google:

Here's information that may help the person who posed the initial question:

http://www.celiac.com/articles/104/1/Refractory-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html

Also, important new information about trace gluten coming out now in studies (in case anyone else coming to this thread is looking for help with ongoing symptoms):

http://celiacdisease.about.com/b/2013/03/04/study-trace-gluten-responsible-for-ongoing-celiac-symptoms.htm?nl=1

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Wow... so, back to the original question. I'm only 8  months into this, but I have been off work at least a few days a month as well. I seem to have no resistance at all now to whatever bug's going around -- besides my stomach issues.

 

Wuss? I don't think so. I don't even eat out anymore but dang it, something keeps making me sick. So I feel for you.

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I do not think Peg needs to start worrying about refractory sprue. Feeling crappy once and a while does not mean dire circumstances.

It may mean she is just still healing.

 

Peg, correct me if I am wrong, but didn't you just do a gluten challenge not too long ago? (I feel like it was you we were cheerleading through

a challenge about 4 months ago) If that's the case, you most definitely may still be healing.

 

I never tell this to newbies, but the truth is, it took me 15 months before I felt like I was turning a corner. I was left unDXed for so long and had so many complications, I had to be patient for a very long time. Gemini, Karen, mushroom, ravenwoodglass and so many others just told me be patient, it will come. Gotta Ski is my healing buddy--as she has had setbacks herself ---but perseveres every single day. I told myself "every day is a healing day" and even though I did not like the slow recovery, it has happened and I have my life back.Am I 100%--no, but I am not dying either and I have done more physically this past week than I could for 5 years.

 

I went from being unable to dress myself or walk the length of my driveway without gasping for breath, my muscles so impaired I was told to get a scooter---to swimming with dolphins this week here in Florida.  :) It's 27 months post DX for me.

 

Never say die, do not give up and keep your eyes on the prize--healing your body. Hang in there.

 

Sorry if there are any typos. I am sitting outside a starbucks and the sun is blinding me and the screen. 

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I went from being unable to dress myself or walk the length of my driveway without gasping for breath, my muscles so impaired I was told to get a scooter---to swimming with dolphins this week here in Florida.  :) It's 27 months post DX for me.

 

THIS is so inspiring!!

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IrishHeart, why wouldn't you tell a newbie how long it took? I was just about to pose that question to folks. Although I'm amazed at how different life is without gluten for the first time, I still wake up wondering if I'll ever move beyond this place - thrilled the mind is functioning but the body still fatigued & wonky.

What constitutes a newbie? I'm past the terror of eating the wrong thing (no longer limiting myself to hummus & carrots) & the weekly/bi-monthly hits but body still aches w/fatigue. I have also eliminated dairy & soy (FYI).

That second link I posted has to do with new studies showing the gluten-free foods aren't gluten-free enough for some with Celiac. So although someone may believe they are not consuming gluten, they may still feel crummy due to the consumption of gluten-free products that are merely gluten-free enough to put a gluten-free label on it. It's a growing concern among people in the community.

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p.s. I look forward to months 15 to 27!

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Gemini, I just want to say your posts have helped me since I arrived here last year. they made me realize I am driving the bus of my health, and if I want to feel better I have to figure out what was making me sick. no one else could do that for me or help. thankfully, I am doing great now, and rarely have to cancel plans or become fearful to make them.

 

I teach yoga and pilates, and just before I figured all this out I was going to give up all my classes. can you imagine feeling dizzy, nauseous and overall fogged then inverting in front of a crowded gym? was not a pretty picture. thankfully I didn't give up my classes and am doing great!

 

so thanks to you and all the truth tellers on this board. you literally saved my life.

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Well... I feel like this is almost off-topic now, but I'm gonna go back to original topic, if that's okay with everybody here.

 

I'm gluten-free for two weeks today. So super newbie. Thankfully, I have a really chill job where I text my boss at 8am if I'm not feeling good enough to come in. He doesn't care if I'm there or not, my work does not effect anyone else directly. The only thing that changes if I show up or not is how soon a massive (never going to be done) project gets done, and how big my paycheck is.

 

Pre-diagnosis, I hated calling in sick. I hated myself. I had no idea why I felt so bloody awful, and no one around me was ever sick either. I felt guilty and like a wuss. I told myself I was making it all up. For months, I was missing about one day every week or two. The last two months, it got way worse. I missed five days in a row in January. I hated myself.

 

Finally, I got my diagnosis and had an answer. I told my boss what was up, and even though he was really understanding before, he's even more so now. I can go home early if I suddenly don't feel good anymore, he sometimes catches me just blankly staring at my screen, and tells me to go home; he's just really awesome. I miss mornings more often, and when I wander in at 1pm, my co-workers will tease and say, "Good morning!" but they don't care either. Two of them think I only work parttime anyways, and the others either don't notice that I wasn't there, or don't care I'm not.

 

So I guess I'm really lucky, job-wise, because I can just be a wuss and miss time, and not risk anything. Well, maybe a reccomendation when this temp job is over, but I'll deal with that in a few months.

 

I still feel like a bit of a wuss calling in sick or missing work, but I know there's a reason for it, and it will be a slow recovery. I'm actually more worried about May, when this job ends. I'm crossing my fingers that almost three months will be enough recovery to function at a normal job that isn't as chill.

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Adela, welcome to the forum!

Trust me, it'll get better. At least now you know, a: why you've felt so cruddy and b: that you'll slowly but steadily get better and better.

 

GottaSki, yeah, I definitely don't think I have anything serious going on. Nothing aside from the occasional eating-out cc incident, and VERY occasional eating of cc'd products. Gluten-wise, that almost never happens anymore because I read labels a million times. Milk and soy cc still happen though, but I'm getting more diligent there too.

I have NEVER, nor will I ever, do a gluten challenge (official diagnosis be damned!). If you think me missing a day every month or so is bad, I don't even want to think of how horrible I'd get if I had to eat gluten again. Never ever ever ever.

I was probably challenging myself to eat as cleanly as possible in attempt to root out the last vestiges of milk and soy and see if i felt better without it (and to make sure there wasn't another intolerance I hadn't noticed).

I think it took me about a year to feel back to normal just gluten-free, and did really well for another year or so, until the milk problem popped up, then the soy problem, so it's up and down. I'm lucky in that I caught my disease quite early so didn't develop as many symptoms as some, and likely healed faster than some too. Also, when I get glutened my reactions are nothing compared to what some celiacs go through.

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Welcome Adela! I'm glad you have an answer. It's difficult not knowing the answer to "why" and the constant second-guessing (feeling like a wuss). I once sat on the couch in a stupor for five hours. I thought it was either dissociative identity disorder or the worst case of ADD/OCD ever! It sounds like your boss really understands.

I'm into this about 4.5 months and am feeling like a wuss today - mostly because my expectations don't match reality and I wanted to accomplish more than am able. But needless to say, the unexpected changes that are occurring make me truly hopeful and excited. For the first time in my life, I wonder what I'll be when I grow up (and I'm way past that stage of development age-wise)!

Good luck to you on your healing path. New beginnings :)

Cali

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I have to step in and say something about your comment.

 

You could not possibly be more wrong in your assessment of Gemini.

Common sense is her strongest asset. She is, in fact, the first person who reached out to me when I first came on this site and she has more compassion in her little finger than most people I know.  She is very celiac-savvy and knows more about autoimmune diseases than most people, offered me her personal help when I was struggling (because I too had a soy, dairy and about 10 other foods intolerance going on) and I have even met her in person. She is a down-to-earth, funny woman.

 

What she isn't --is a "coddler".

 

Just because she tells it like it is---does not mean she is "abusive" in any way and I do not see any violation of the rules.

 

Her approach may be  different from mine, perhaps, but she is always willing to help.

I for one, appreciate her "veteran" knowledge.

I'm sorry to beat a dead horse, but I just don't see how responding to a heartfelt post about the profound

effects that chronic depression has on someone with "When you stop feeling sorry for yourself" qualifies

as 'telling it like it is'.

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Ah Peg - think you may be confusing me with Irish - which is a huge compliment.

And for others reading along - removing gluten alone did not bring health to me -- yet it did for two of my kids and two grands....my family could be the poster for early diagnosis.

Ps..someone asked.why we wouldn't tell newbies it takes years to heal? MOST celiacs do heal with the complete removal of gluten for a period of 3 to 12 months. Why would we, that have had the worst possible outcome of this disease want to put scary thoughts into those newly diagnosed?

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Ah Peg - think you may be confusing me with Irish - which is a huge compliment.

And for others reading along - removing gluten alone did not bring health to me -- yet it did for two of my kids and two grands....my family could be the poster for early diagnosis.

Ps..someone asked.why we wouldn't tell newbies it takes years to heal? MOST celiacs do heal with the complete removal of gluten for a period of 3 to 12 months. Why would we, that have had the worst possible outcome of this disease want to put scary thoughts into those newly diagnosed?

Exactly why I do not say how long it took for me. I had complications that are not typical of most celiacs and so, saying it took me over 2 years plus  intensive physical therapy to boot may sound disheartening for some newly diagnosed. I am not the "norm". My GI doctor says he has never seen celiac disease manifest in the myriad of symptoms as it did in me. (believe me, I wish I did not have this distinction. <_< )

 

If asked, I tell the truth, of course.

 

My point in revealing it now is that healing times vary, but staying the course and keeping positive and patient is crucial. Every day is a healing day.

 

Above all else, I think being your own health advocate, researching celiac and staying on top of current info is the key.

 

When Gemini said "if I can do it you can" I am sure she meant it as encouraging because she was almost dead. She climbed out of the hole.

 

If I say "You can do this, I promise, just hang in there"--- I mean the same thing. It's just worded differently.

 

I was about as bad as it gets, but I am walking proof that healing happens.

 

Hope this clears up what I was trying to say.I hope it clears up what I believe Gemini was trying to say.

It is easy to take one sentence out of someone's long posts and isolate it and use it to somehow change the intention of the message.

 

Like all messages posted on forums, they are "take it or leave it". Some people may come across as "tough love" and some are more temperate.  But the intention is not unkind.

 

It may be time to let this topic go.

Peg got the input she was looking for, I believe.

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Welcome Adela! I'm glad you have an answer. It's difficult not knowing the answer to "why" and the constant second-guessing (feeling like a wuss). I once sat on the couch in a stupor for five hours. I thought it was either dissociative identity disorder or the worst case of ADD/OCD ever! It sounds like your boss really understands.

I'm into this about 4.5 months and am feeling like a wuss today - mostly because my expectations don't match reality and I wanted to accomplish more than am able. But needless to say, the unexpected changes that are occurring make me truly hopeful and excited. For the first time in my life, I wonder what I'll be when I grow up (and I'm way past that stage of development age-wise)!

Good luck to you on your healing path. New beginnings :)

Cali

 

 

Cali, hon---you may need to drop the expectations so you do not put too much pressure on yourself to be "instantly healed". I had to learn that one early on. The times I felt "wussy" were when I did not respond quickly enough. It was during those times that Gemini and the others told me--just hang in there. It may take a long time. I did not like that answer, but I accepted it.

 

Look at one day at a time, don't put a time limit on it and if you want to be encouraged, I suggest making a list of your symptoms and then, every month, cross off the ones that resolve.  Just a suggestion! Hang in there.

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Gemini, I just want to say your posts have helped me since I arrived here last year. they made me realize I am driving the bus of my health, and if I want to feel better I have to figure out what was making me sick. no one else could do that for me or help. thankfully, I am doing great now, and rarely have to cancel plans or become fearful to make them.

 

I teach yoga and pilates, and just before I figured all this out I was going to give up all my classes. can you imagine feeling dizzy, nauseous and overall fogged then inverting in front of a crowded gym? was not a pretty picture. thankfully I didn't give up my classes and am doing great!

 

so thanks to you and all the truth tellers on this board. you literally saved my life.

  julissa......I wasn't going to add anything to this thread because I've had my say and stand behind everything I said BUT.....I am thrilled to death if I have managed to help you get better.  I, too, suffered from extreme nausea, dizziness and foggy head so understand totally your concerns with regards to your exercise.  But......exercise does help, doesn't it?  I was not well enough to start a class until 5 years into the gluten-free diet but I did join a gym and have never looked back.  Some nights when I go, I don't feel like exercising or am tired but force myself to go and it never fails to make me feel better after an hour of exercise.

It takes a person to a whole new level of healing and I bet you are an inspiration to your clients.  Pilates is HARD so I give you a ton of credit for sticking with it!

 

Keep up the good work!  :)

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Our society revolves around eating food which isn't safe for a celiac. Physically our bodies demand food, and the smell of glutinous foods still make us hungry. Going out to eat and getting glutened 'more oftened than necessary' is hardly the same as drinking yourself into hangovers so bad you can't work. Mainly, you have to knowingly consume a lot of alcohol to get that drunk. Secondly, alcoholic consumption doesn't have much of a societal push past teenage years whereas if you are social at all, you will get food you can't eat being offered to you daily. Excessive alcoholic consumption is frowned upon. Eating a piece of cake isn't. They don't fall into the same category when it comes down to self-control, not unless you're an alcoholic. I wouldn't want to work at a place where my boss, if I decided to eat out with the rest of the employees at a restaurant where I took all the precautions one can, but still got sick and missed a couple days work, then fired me for it. You wouldn't offer an alcoholic a drink and then blame them for taking it.

Eating at restaurants has become a part of a regular working person's life.

 

Of course, that alcohol consumption was brought into this as an example just supports what I was saying even more. Over 50% of alcoholics in the US have a diagnosed mental illness. (The rest of the alcoholics probably fell through the cracks of the system, or lack thereof, and never got diagnosed, but that's just my opinion.)

http://mbldownloads.com/0105PP_Westreich.pdf

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Our society revolves around eating food which isn't safe for a celiac. Physically our bodies demand food, and the smell of glutinous foods still make us hungry. Going out to eat and getting glutened 'more oftened than necessary' is hardly the same as drinking yourself into hangovers so bad you can't work. Mainly, you have to knowingly consume a lot of alcohol to get that drunk. Secondly, alcoholic consumption doesn't have much of a societal push past teenage years whereas if you are social at all, you will get food you can't eat being offered to you daily. Excessive alcoholic consumption is frowned upon. Eating a piece of cake isn't. They don't fall into the same category when it comes down to self-control, not unless you're an alcoholic. I wouldn't want to work at a place where my boss, if I decided to eat out with the rest of the employees at a restaurant where I took all the precautions one can, but still got sick and missed a couple days work, then fired me for it. You wouldn't offer an alcoholic a drink and then blame them for taking it.

Eating at restaurants has become a part of a regular working person's life.

 

Of course, that alcohol consumption was brought into this as an example just supports what I was saying even more. Over 50% of alcoholics in the US have a diagnosed mental illness. (The rest probably feel through the cracks of the system, or lack thereof, and never got diagnosed, but that's just my opinion.)

http://mbldownloads.com/0105PP_Westreich.pdf

 

 

You missed the point.  The point being - if you are having issues with gluten that are affecting your life adversely and you can do something to prevent them, you should.  If that means not eating out or not eating dairy or taking your meds, than do it. 

 

I'm not arguing with you anymore because it won't make any difference.

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Gemini, thanks, I do intend to keep working at it :)

 

Cavernio, I strongly disagree here, socializing may revolve around eating out, at work, with friends, wherever, but just because eating out is so common to our lives, doesn't mean we have to. I take a cooler wherever I go. I go to certain restaurants with my food, I refuse to eat something that may get me sick. people I am with totally understand and help me with choosing places, etc.  other restaurants that I wouldn't take food to, I just don't go.

 

people ask me if just a little would hurt, how sick could I possibly get. I ask them how sick they could possibly get eating rat poison.

 

I am also done here. 

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Before I bow out of this discussion too, I'd like to add that the majority of us on this board had multiple health issues from celiac, including 

anxiety and depression. Adherence to a gluten-free diet, supplementing with appropriate vitamins, minerals, amino acids and probiotics, eliminating other food intolerances if they arise and finding ways to enjoy life--despite the restrictions of a gluten free diet--has given us our lives back.

 

Did we bitch and moan about it at first? sure.

Did we feel like there was no light at the end of the tunnel? Sometimes, yes.

But then it was time to embrace the "new norm" and get on with living. I always get myself in a tizzy when someone says we are "not normal".

what does that even mean? who says we're not normal and the rest of the world is screwed up? 

 

There's a line from the Shawshank Redemption swimming through my head. It goes "you can get busy living or you can get busy dying".

I chose living.

It took me a long time to get some semblance of good health back, but I did everything in my power to get here. 

 

I have traveled over 2,050 miles since Feb. 28th, with a cooler, a portable kitchen, some supplies AND I have eaten at restaurants cited on "Find me Gluten Free" as being celiac- friendly and I am having the time of my life. I am staying by the ocean and could not be happier.

3 years ago, I was ready for a wheelchair or a mental health ward because my brain was so impaired.

 

Until I was comfortable with making trips like this, I dined in, frequented a strictly gluten free cafe near me OR invited people to MY house, where I cooked and enjoyed their company. THERE IS ALWAYS A PLAN B, C. D....

 

It totally sucked at the beginning and I thought my life was over, but NOT because I have to be gluten-free/SF/SF or any other free--that's so miniscule in the large scheme of things that I do not even think about that anymore--but because I was so ill and physically incapacitated. Was I mentally ill too? I guess, to some degree. I felt I had no control over the deep depression I was falling into (  tanked D, B-12, & folate levels will do that to a person), yet I would not give in to it. I certainly was a raging insomniac for 3 years who could barely make sense of things.

 

I am not saying all mental health issues will resolve off gluten, but even our member Skylark reported to us that her alleged bipolar resolved

and she requires no meds. She does not post anymore because she did a ton of research for us all and she has gone off to live her life and not dwell on what had happened to her. She does not want to talk to nay-sayers and doom- and -gloomers anymore, no doubt. 

 

Why do the rest of us stay? To help. If sometimes our messages seem like "tough love", so be it.

But at some point, you all have to say "it is what it is", so I have celiac, big freakin deal. 

We're still here. Some of our members are battling cancer and some have passed away, but they never gave in to the whining or the "poor me" stuff for very long. They just live--one day at a time.

It's all any of us can do anyway.

 

Just my two cents. FWIW

Now if you will excuse me, there's a margarita and a deck chair with my name on it. B) 

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Why do the rest of us stay? To help. If sometimes our messages seem like "tough love", so be it.

But at some point, you all have to say "it is what it is", so I have celiac, big freakin deal. 

We're still here. Some of our members are battling cancer and some have passed away, but they never gave in to the whining or the "poor me" stuff for very long. They just live--one day at a time.

It's all any of us can do anyway.

 

Well said, IH.  I thought it needed repeating.  We are still here.  And we are still here in the hopes that we can help others to be still here, living life.  We are not here to be the wicked witches of the west.  We are not here because we like arguing or because we feel sorry for ourselves.  We are here to try to give you whatever help you need.  If you don't like the message, feel free to disregard it.  But don't complain because it was offered -- you did after all come here seeking it, even if it wasn't the message you hoped for. 

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Hi there:

you're not a wuss. I also stay home more than I'd like when I get glutened. It's a terrible feeling and best to just stay in, lie down, drink water, take digestive aids and ride it out alone. It's miserable and sad and it hurts me and I'm sure it hurts you. Nobody likes to feel bad and miss out on living.

 

And, since we are kinda complaining, I'll add that it's impossible for my friends and family to understand.  Recently I was with someone and felt pretty good. We went out to eat and had a nice meal. Within half an hour I was in pain, exhausted and couldn't do anything other than lie down on the hotel bed (we were travelling).  It was a real bummer because my friend wanted to go to the hotel bar and have a good time. I'd been all for it and suddenly, BAM: OUT OF COMMISSION. I know the friend didn't really get it.

 

So you are not alone. 

 

And yes, I do sometimes miss work. I try not to as my work is not at all understanding. Usually when I refuse to eat something at a work event at random regular restaurant, I get ridiculed or asked "why aren't you eating the food at this restaurant? How could chicken possibly contain gluten?" and the question is always so accusatory. it pisses me the feck off, in fact.  Anyway, when I respond  by talking about cross-contam, I get the eye -- roll. lol. So I think it's just not worth explaining further. Though I gotta tell ya, it's getting really fecking annoying that everytime I say "NO" to eating X, I get push back. I think that is my biggest struggle....I graciously refuse food and the people i'm with can't graciously accept my refusals.

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K-Dawg, Here is what I would do: Stop being so gracious about the refusal.

 

What part of NO don't they get? Eating is not mandatory for any job I know.

 

(unless you are a food critic)

 

This borders on harassment, if you ask me.

 

I have never once had to repeat myself about the treatment for celiac as being "no gluten!".

 

Tell them it's doctor's orders and be done with it.   You do not need to explain yourself to anyone-- be it family, friends or co-workers.

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ell said, IH.  I thought it needed repeating.  We are still here.  And we are still here in the hopes that we can help others to be still here, living life.  We are not here to be the wicked witches of the west.  We are not here because we like arguing or because we feel sorry for ourselves.  We are here to try to give you whatever help you need.  If you don't like the message, feel free to disregard it.  But don't complain because it was offered -- you did after all come here seeking it, even if it wasn't the message you hoped for. 

 

 

I haven't been around much lately but I am still so grateful to 'shroomie and many others for all their help when I was preparing to go gluten free.  Even though I am not around so much, I am super grateful for them and that they are still here helping others who came after me. Thank you.

 

This borders on harassment, if you ask me.

 

I agree. I don't get any grief about what I do or don't eat and I would never take it from anyone.  It's not worth it to my health, and I don't want to associate with anyone so nasty.  I get that you can't chose your co-workers, and work situations are a lot harder, but I wouldn't bother being gracious to anyone who treated you like this, even if it's in your nature to be nice to people.  Sometimes, they deserve a not so nice response to those kind of insane argumentative replies. 

 

I do disagree with the comment that that alcohol is not pushed so much beyond teenage years as food is.  That may be the case in communities in the US but Australian culture includes a lot of drinking and so did life in London where going out for after work drinks a number of times a week was super common and accepted.  Many of us turned up for work feeling rather worse for wear and in retrospect, I think that was an issue. But it was work encouraged and often endorsed (we had drinks at work, or were out drinking with our managers and coworkers).  When my team was seen as a bit cliquey and not attending drinks with everyone else, they moved the location to our office and some Friday evenings we were literally sitting at our desks finishing up our work while coworkers from less busy teams drank and socialised around us.  Whereas food, pfffft, no one cared about that.  I also think the style of food in the US is much more gluten-y than I am used here to so I do sympathise there. It stresses me out a fair bit when I travel to the US whereas in Australia and the UK it's no big deal and there are usually quite a few items that would be naturally gluten free.

 

To the OP, I can be pretty wussy and want to stay home if I feel ill. I figure if I don't feel well at home, communting an hour each way on the bus is really not going to help.  So don't beat yourself up about it, you have a fellow wuss in me :-)

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Cali, hon---you may need to drop the expectations so you do not put too much pressure on yourself to be "instantly healed". I had to learn that one early on. The times I felt "wussy" were when I did not respond quickly enough. It was during those times that Gemini and the others told me--just hang in there. It may take a long time. I did not like that answer, but I accepted it.

 

Look at one day at a time, don't put a time limit on it and if you want to be encouraged, I suggest making a list of your symptoms and then, every month, cross off the ones that resolve.  Just a suggestion! Hang in there.

Thank you, Irish. That's a good idea on keeping a symptoms list. Since you are the third person in a week who has spoken to me about expectations, I think I'll listen. I messed up last weekend because I went somewhere famished and am currently paying the price. I only wish I was in the place to have high expectations right now! The bargaining stage isn't bearing much fruit.

Maybe it was just a bad day. I see a lot of intelligent, supportive posts from Gemini. Have started taking an enzyme at mealtime but seriously wonder if anything is much help right now. I don't feel like a wuss today, just beaten. Tomorrow is a new day, eh?

Thanks for the support.

Cali

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